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  • 1.
    Balatsky, Alexander V.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA.
    Balatsky, Galina I.
    Borysov, Stanislav S.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Resource Demand Growth and Sustainability Due to Increased World Consumption2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 3430-3440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper aims at continuing the discussion on sustainability and attempts to forecast the impossibility of the expanding consumption worldwide due to the planet's limited resources. As the population of China, India and other developing countries continue to increase, they would also require more natural and financial resources to sustain their growth. We coarsely estimate the volumes of these resources (energy, food, freshwater) and the gross domestic product (GDP) that would need to be achieved to bring the population of India and China to the current levels of consumption in the United States. We also provide estimations for potentially needed immediate growth of the world resource consumption to meet this equality requirement. Given the tight historical correlation between GDP and energy consumption, the needed increase of GDP per capita in the developing world to the levels of the U.S. would deplete explored fossil fuel reserves in less than two decades. These estimates predict that the world economy would need to find a development model where growth would be achieved without heavy dependence on fossil fuels.

  • 2.
    Bennich, Therese
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Belyazid, Salim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    The Route to Sustainability-Prospects and Challenges of the Bio-Based Economy2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 6, article id 887Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The bio-based economy has been increasingly recognized in the sustainability debate over the last two decades, presented as a solution to a number of ecological and social challenges. Its premises include climate change mitigation, cleaner production processes, economic growth, and new employment opportunities. Yet, a transition to a bio-based economy is hampered by risk factors and uncertainties. In this paper, we explore the concept of a bio-based economy, focusing on opportunities of achieving sustainability, as well as challenges of a transition. Departing from an understanding of sustainability provided by the weak and strong sustainability paradigms, we first outline the definition and development of the bio-based economy from a theoretical perspective. Second, we use Sweden as an example of how a transition towards a bio-based economy has been evolving in practice. The review indicates that the proposed direction and strategies of the bio-based economy are promising, but sometimes contradictory, resulting in different views on the actions needed for its premises to be realized. Additionally, current developments adhere largely to the principles of the weak sustainability paradigm. In order for the bio-based economy to develop in accordance with the notion of strong sustainability, important steps to facilitate a transition would include acknowledging and addressing the trade-offs caused by biophysical and social limits to growth.

  • 3.
    Biggs, Reinette
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Crépin, Ann-Sophie
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Engström, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Kautsky, Nils
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Walker, Brian
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Sustainable Ecosystems, Australia.
    General Resilience to Cope with Extreme Events2012In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 4, no 12, p. 3248-3259Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

     Resilience to specified kinds of disasters is an active area of research and practice. However, rare or unprecedented disturbances that are unusually intense or extensive require a more broad-spectrum type of resilience. General resilience is the capacity of social-ecological systems to adapt or transform in response to unfamiliar, unexpected and extreme shocks. Conditions that enable general resilience include diversity, modularity, openness, reserves, feedbacks, nestedness, monitoring, leadership, and trust. Processes for building general resilience are an emerging and crucially important area of research.

  • 4. Clift, Roland
    et al.
    Sim, Sarah
    King, Henry
    Chenoweth, Jonathan L.
    Christie, Ian
    Clavreul, Julie
    Mueller, Carina
    Posthuma, Leo
    Boulay, Anne-Marie
    Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca
    Chatterton, Julia
    DeClerck, Fabrice
    Druckman, Angela
    France, Chris
    Franco, Antonio
    Gerten, Dieter
    Goedkoop, Mark
    Hauschild, Michael Z.
    Huijbregts, Mark A. J.
    Koellner, Thomas
    Lambin, Eric F.
    Lee, Jacquetta
    Mair, Simon
    Marshall, Stuart
    McLachlan, Michael S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Mila i Canals, Llorenc
    Mitchell, Cynthia
    Price, Edward
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Suckling, James
    Murphy, Richard
    The Challenges of Applying Planetary Boundaries as a Basis for Strategic Decision-Making in Companies with Global Supply Chains2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 2, article id 279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Planetary Boundaries (PB) framework represents a significant advance in specifying the ecological constraints on human development. However, to enable decision-makers in business and public policy to respect these constraints in strategic planning, the PB framework needs to be developed to generate practical tools. With this objective in mind, we analyse the recent literature and highlight three major scientific and technical challenges in operationalizing the PB approach in decision-making: first, identification of thresholds or boundaries with associated metrics for different geographical scales; second, the need to frame approaches to allocate fair shares in the 'safe operating space' bounded by the PBs across the value chain and; third, the need for international bodies to co-ordinate the implementation of the measures needed to respect the Planetary Boundaries. For the first two of these challenges, we consider how they might be addressed for four PBs: climate change, freshwater use, biosphere integrity and chemical pollution and other novel entities. Four key opportunities are identified: (1) development of a common system of metrics that can be applied consistently at and across different scales; (2) setting 'distance from boundary' measures that can be applied at different scales; (3) development of global, preferably open-source, databases and models; and (4) advancing understanding of the interactions between the different PBs. Addressing the scientific and technical challenges in operationalizing the planetary boundaries needs be complemented with progress in addressing the equity and ethical issues in allocating the safe operating space between companies and sectors.

  • 5.
    Colding, Johan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Barthel, Stephan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    The Role of University Campuses in Reconnecting Humans to the Biosphere2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 12, article id 2349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we explore the potential for integrating university campuses in a global sustainability agenda for a closer reconnection of urban residents to the biosphere. This calls for a socio-cultural transition that allows universities and colleges to reconnect to the biosphere and become active stewards of the Earth System. Recognizing their pivotal role of fostering coming generations of humans, university campuses represent a unique socio-cultural setting to promote sustainable development in practice. Among others, this involves the nurturing of biodiversity and ecosystem services in the Antropocene era, which is characterized by ongoing climate change and massive loss of biodiversity and ecosystem services. We explore the traditional campus setting, its role as a community for rejuvenating town planning and its role as a governance authority that may promote or retard sustainable development with an ecological focus. We explore the sustainable university and describe the campus as an ecosystem and how a resilient campus can be designed to meet the novel and critical challenges of the Anthropocene. We conclude by providing some policy recommendations for higher educational institutes to speed up their ambitions in the area of sustainable biosphere management.

  • 6. Gerst, Michael D.
    et al.
    Raskin, Paul D.
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Contours of a Resilient Global Future2014In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 123-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Humanity confronts a daunting double challenge in the 21st century: meeting widely-held aspirations for equitable human development while preserving the bio-physical integrity of Earth systems. Extant scientific attempts to quantify futures that address these sustainability challenges are often not comprehensive across environmental and social drivers of global change, or rely on quantification methods that largely exclude deep social, cultural, economic, and technological shifts, leading to a constrained set of possibilities. In search of a broader set of trajectories, we combine three previously separate streams of inquiry: scenario analysis, planetary boundaries, and targets for human development. Our analysis indicates there are plausible, diverse scenarios that remain within Earth's safe bio-physical operating space and achieve a variety of development targets. However, dramatic social and technological changes are required to avert the social-ecological risks of a conventional development trajectory. One identified narrative, which is predominant in the scenario literature, envisions marginal changes to the social and cultural drivers underlying conventional growth trajectories. As a result, it requires unprecedented levels of international cooperation, alignment of powerful conflicting interests, and political willpower to bend technological change in a sustainable direction. We posit that a more viable and robust scenario might lie in the coupling of transformative social-cultural and technological changes, which set the necessary conditions for a transition to a resilient global future. While clearly a first step, our analysis points to the need for more in-depth exploration of the mechanisms and determinant forces for such unconventional futures.

  • 7. Hajer, Maarten
    et al.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Raworth, Kate
    Bakker, Peter
    Berkhout, Frans
    de Boer, Yvo
    Rockström, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ludwig, Kathrin
    Kok, Marcel
    Beyond Cockpit-ism: Four Insights to Enhance the Transformative Potential of the Sustainable Development Goals2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 1651-1660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) have the potential to become a powerful political vision that can support the urgently needed global transition to a shared and lasting prosperity. In December 2014, the United Nations (UN) Secretary General published his report on the SDGs. However, the final goals and targets that will be adopted by the UN General Assembly in September 2015 risk falling short of expectations because of what we call cockpit-ism: the illusion that top-down steering by governments and intergovernmental organizations alone can address global problems. In view of the limited effectiveness of intergovernmental efforts and questions about the capacity of national governments to affect change, the SDGs need to additionally mobilize new agents of change such as businesses, cities and civil society. To galvanize such a broad set of actors, multiple perspectives on sustainable development are needed that respond to the various motives and logics of change of these different actors. We propose four connected perspectives which can strengthen the universal relevance of the SDGs: planetary boundaries to stress the urgency of addressing environmental concerns and to target governments to take responsibility for (global) public goods; the safe and just operating space to highlight the interconnectedness of social and environmental concerns and its distributive consequences; the energetic society to benefit from the willingness of a broad group of actors worldwide to take action; and green competition to stimulate innovation and new business practices. To realize the transformative potential of the SDGs, these four perspectives should be reflected in the focus and content of the SDGs that will be negotiated in the run up to September 2015 and its further implementation.

  • 8.
    Hansson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Larsson, Aron
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Danielson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Ekenberg, Love
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Coping with Complex Environmental and Societal Flood Risk Management Decisions: An Integrated Multi-criteria Framework2011In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 3, no 9, p. 1357-1380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, a great deal of attention has been focused on the financial risk management of natural disasters. One reason behind is that the economic losses from floods, windstorms, earthquakes and other disasters in both the developing and developed countries are escalating dramatically. It has become apparent that an integrated water resource management approach would be beneficial in order to take both the best interests of society and of the environment into consideration. One improvement consists of models capable of handling multiple criteria (conflicting objectives) as well as multiple stakeholders (conflicting interests). A systems approach is applied for coping with complex environmental and societal risk management decisions with respect to flood catastrophe policy formation, wherein the emphasis is on computer-based modeling and simulation techniques combined with methods for evaluating strategies where numerous stakeholders are incorporated in the process. The resulting framework consists of a simulation model, a decision analytical tool, and a set of suggested policy strategies for policy formulation. The framework will aid decision makers with high risk complex environmental decisions subject to significant uncertainties.

  • 9.
    Harring, Niklas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jagers, Sverker C.
    Matti, Simon
    Public Support for Pro-Environmental Policy Measures: Examining the Impact of Personal Values and Ideology2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 5, article id 679Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the relationship between two major explanations of the formation of positive attitudes towards environmental policy measures. Ideological orientation and personal values have, in theory, significant overlaps in the sense that they collect general and cross-situational sentiments used to understand and evaluate a wide range of political issues. However, in the empirical literature, although they independently have been shown to have rather significant effects on pro-environmental policy attitudes, they are rarely tested together in order to explore whether they capture the same basic mechanisms. In this article, two data sets from Sweden are used to demonstrate both that ideological orientation and personal values independently affect pro-environmental policy support, as well as that these effects differ across different policy types.

  • 10.
    Hebinck, Aniek
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Wageningen University, The Netherlands.
    Page, Daphne
    Processes of Participation in the Development of Urban Food Strategies: A Comparative Assessment of Exeter and Eindhoven2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 6, article id 931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban food strategies are increasingly being used as means to address a multitude of challenges presented by food system failings. The use of participatory approaches has become common practice in the field of urban food systems planning. These approaches are believed to democratize, legitimize and increase effectiveness of addressing challenges. Despite these promises, they have also been viewed as problematic for being unbalanced and lacking accountability. This paper sets out to compare the creation and use of new participatory spaces in two initiatives in two European cities in their on-going attempts to formulate urban food strategies through multi-actor processes. This is explored through operationalisation of two key concepts essential to participatory approaches: participation and accountability. As such, the paper addresses how participatory processes for urban food strategies can be conceptualised when policy making involves the interplay of actors, knowledges and spaces. We conclude that within the two cases, ample attention is given to get a cross-section of the types of participants involved, while accountability is an aspect still under-represented. Based on the two cases, we argue that incorporation of accountability in particular will be instrumental in the development and implementation of more mature urban food strategies. However, it is essential for participatory processes to not completely break from more traditional policy processes, at risk of limiting progress in strategy development and deployment.

  • 11.
    Ignell, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Davies, Peter
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam). Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Swedish Upper Secondary School Students' Conceptions of Negative Environmental Impact and Pricing2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 982-996Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores relationships between upper secondary school students. understanding of prices and environmental impacts. The study uses responses from 110 students to problems in which they were asked to explain differences in prices and also to express and justify opinions on what should be the difference in prices. Very few students expressed an environmental dimension in their understanding of price. A few students suggested that environmental impact influenced price by raising demand for Environmentally friendly products. A few students suggested that, environmentally friendly products. had higher prices because they were more costly to produce. We found no examples of students combining both lines of explanation. However, nearly half of the students believed that prices should reflect environmental effects, and this reasoning was divided between cases where the point was justified by a broad environmental motivation and cases where the point was justified in relation to incentives-to get consumers to act in a more environmentally friendly way.

  • 12.
    Kalantari, Zahra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Khoshkar, Sara
    Falk, Helena
    Cvetkovic, Vladimir
    Mörtberg, Ulla
    Accessibility of Water-Related Cultural Ecosystem Services through Public Transport-A Model for Planning Support in the Stockholm Region2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 3, article id 346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Planning for sustainable cities involves supporting compact, energy-efficient urban form as well as maintaining attractive and liveable urban landscapes. Attractive cities depend highly on services provided by ecosystems, especially cultural ecosystem services (ES), which give direct benefits to urban citizens. Therefore, access to a diversity of urban functions and publicly available ES by walking and public transport should be considered when planning for sustainable cities. This could be facilitated by user-friendly planning support models. The aim of this study was to develop a GIS-based model for assessing accessibility to ES, more specifically, water-related cultural ecosystem services (WCES), via walking and public transport, with input from stakeholders. The model was applied to the Stockholm region in Sweden. Travel times and census data were used to derive measures and maps of accessibility to prioritised WCES in the region, today and in urbanisation scenarios for 2050. The results showed how access to WCES varied spatially within the region. The number of potential visitors to different WCES sites now and in the future urbanisation scenarios was estimated, and areas in need for future development of the public transport system as well as WCES were identified. The GIS-based accessibility model has potential to be used as planning support in urban planning.

  • 13. Larsson, Markus
    et al.
    Milestad, Rebecka
    Hahn, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    von Oelreich, Jacob
    The Resilience of a Sustainability Entrepreneur in the Swedish Food System2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 6, article id 550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organizational resilience emphasizes the adaptive capacity for renewal after crisis. This paper explores the sustainability and resilience of a not-for-profit firm that claims to contribute to sustainable development of the food system. We used semi-structured interviews and Holling's adaptive cycle as a heuristic device to assess what constitutes social and sustainable entrepreneurship in this case, and we discuss the determinants of organizational resilience. The business, Biodynamiska Produkter (BP), has experienced periods of growth, conservation and rapid decline in demand, followed by periods of re-organization. Our results suggest that BP, with its social mission and focus on organic food, meets the criteria of both a social and sustainability entrepreneurial organization. BP also exhibits criteria for organizational resilience: two major crises in the 1970s and late 1990s were met by re-organization (transformation) and novel market innovations (adaptations). BP has promoted the organic food sector in Sweden, but not profited from this. In this case study, resilience has enhanced sustainability in general, but trade-offs were also identified. The emphasis on trust, local identity, social objectives and slow decisions may have impeded both economic performance and new adaptations. Since the successful innovation Ekoladan in 2003, crises have been met by consolidation rather than new innovations.

  • 14. Lucas, P.L.
    et al.
    Kok, M.T.J.
    Nilsson, Måns
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, School of Architecture and the Built Environment.
    Alkemade, R.
    Integrating Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services in the Post-2015 Development Agenda: Goal Structure, Target Areas and Means of Implementation2014In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 193-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The United Nations’ discussions on defining a new set of post-2015 development goals focus on poverty eradication and sustainable development. Biodiversity and ecosystem services are essential for poverty eradication, which is also one of the foundations of the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity of the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD). Based on an assessment of current proposals of goals and targets, and a quantitative pathway analysis to meet long term biodiversity and food security goals, this paper discusses how biodiversity and ecosystem services can be integrated into a broad set of goals and targets, and concludes with relevant target areas and means of implementation for which specific targets need to be defined. Furthermore, it responds to the call of the CBD to consider the Strategic Plan for Biodiversity and the related Aichi biodiversity targets in the post-2015 development agenda. The paper’s analysis identifies three overlapping but also supplemental ways to integrate biodiversity and ecosystem services in the post-2015 agenda: integrated goals, goals addressing earth system functioning and goals addressing environmental limits. It further concludes seven target areas to be included under the goals to address biodiversity and ecosystem services in the context of food and agriculture: access to food, demand for agricultural products, sustainable intensification, ecosystem fragmentation, protected areas, essential ecosystem services and genetic diversity. The Strategic Plan for Biodiversity provides a good basis for integrating biodiversity and ecosystem services in the post-2015 development agenda. Many Aichi targets address the proposed target areas and the means of implementation discussed, while they need to be complemented with targets that specifically address human well-being, as well as institutions and governance.

  • 15.
    Lundholm, Cecilia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Teaching and Learning in the Social Sciences (CeSam).
    Stöhr, Christian
    Stakeholder dialogues and shared understanding: the case of co-managing fisheries in Sweden2014In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 4525-4536Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is growing interest in communication, participation and learning in multiple fields, such as governance and policy research, natural resource management research and educational research. This paper reports a study on stakeholder dialogues and shared understanding in the context of co-managed fisheries aiming at participation and learning to increase aspects of efficiency, legitimacy and accuracy. The research investigates differing views held by participants on resource decline and how these could be affected through stakeholder dialogues. The results show that diverging views remained after four years of meetings and dialogues, but also that shared understanding in relation to certain topics developed. Participants highlighted that shared understanding was important for the feasibility of co-management, while also addressing issues of invisibility of the resource (fish living under water), uncertainty due to the complexity of the eco systems, and the epistemological difficulties of bringing scientific results into decision-making, which makes shared understanding in this case challenging and even impossible at times.

  • 16.
    Malin, Jonell
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Crona, Beatrice
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Brown, Kelsey
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Rönnbäck, Patrik
    Troell, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Eco-labeled Seafood: Determinants for (Blue) Green Consumption2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, article id 884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eco-certification has become an increasingly popular market-based tool in the endeavor to reduce negative environmental impacts from fisheries and aquaculture. In this study, we aimed at investigating which psychological consumer characteristics influence demand for eco-labeled seafood by correlating consumers’ stated purchasing of eco-labeled seafood to nine variables: environmental knowledge regarding seafood production, familiarity with eco-labels, subjective knowledge, pro-environmental self-identification, sense of personal responsibility, concern for negative environmental impacts from seafood production, perceived consumer effectiveness, gender and education. Questionnaires were distributed to consumers in Stockholm, Sweden, and the data were tested with multiple regression analysis using linear modeling and model averaging (n = 371). Two variables were the best predictors of stated purchasing of eco-labeled seafood: (i) recognition and understanding of eco-labels for seafood (Marine Stewardship Council, Fish for Life, Aquaculture Stewardship Council and KRAV); and (ii) concern for negative environmental impacts associated with seafood production. Meanwhile, consumer environmental knowledge was a weaker predictor. Results from this study suggest that strengthening the emotional component of consumer decision-making and improving the level of consumer familiarity with seafood eco-labels could stimulate more pro-environmental seafood consumption.

  • 17. Manickam, Theeba
    et al.
    Cornelissen, Gerard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM). Norwegian Geotechnical Institute (NGI), Norway; Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway.
    Bachmann, Robert T.
    Ibrahim, Illani Z.
    Mulder, Jan
    Hale, Sarah E.
    Biochar Application in Malaysian Sandy and Acid Sulfate Soils: Soil Amelioration Effects and Improved Crop Production over Two Cropping Seasons2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 16756-16770Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The use of biochar as an agricultural soil improvement was tested in acid sulfate and sandy soils from Malaysia, cropped with rice and corn. Malaysia has an abundance of waste rice husks that could be used to produce biochar. Rice husk biochar was produced in a gasifier at a local mill in Kelantan as well as in the laboratory using a controlled, specially designed, top lift up draft system (Belonio unit). Rice husk biochar was applied once to both soils at two doses (2% and 5%), in a pot set up that was carried out for two cropping seasons. Positive and significant crop yield effects were observed for both soils, biochars and crops. The yield effects varied with biochar type and dosage, with soil type and over the cropping seasons. The yield increases observed for the sandy soil were tentatively attributed to significant increases in plant-available water contents (from 4%-5% to 7%-8%). The yield effects in the acid sulfate soil were likely a consequence of a combination of (i) alleviation of plant root stress by aluminum (Ca/Al molar ratios significantly increased, from around 1 to 3-5) and (ii) increases in CEC. The agricultural benefits of rice husk biochar application to Malaysian soils holds promise for its future use.

  • 18. Mihai, Adriana
    et al.
    Marincea, Adina
    Ekenberg, Love
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, IIASA, Austria.
    A MCDM Analysis of the Rosia Montana Gold Mining Project2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 6, p. 7261-7288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need and estimated utility for a structured analysis of the Rosia Montana gold exploitation project have been palpable in the Romanian public sphere during the last 15 years and there is a vast amount of conflicting information and opinions on the benefits and risks involved. This article provides a comprehensive decision analysis of the Rosia Montana project. Over 100 documents from the past years have been gathered regarding the Rosia Montana mining project, which cover the main official, formal and less formal documents covering the case and produced by a wide range of stakeholders. These were then analyzed while designing a multi-criteria tree including the relevant perspectives under which the most commonly discussed four alternatives were analyzed. The result of this can be translated into a valuable recommendation for the mining company and for the political decision-makers. If these stakeholders want the continuation of the project and its acceptance by civil society, the key challenge is to increase the transparency of the process and improve the credibility and legal aspects; if these aspects cannot be met, the decision-makers need to pay attention to the alternatives available for a sustainable development in the area.

  • 19.
    Mohedano Roldán, Alba
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Political Regime and Learning Outcomes of Stakeholder Participation: Cross-National Study of 81 Biosphere Reserves2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 4, article id 553Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Stakeholder participation in natural resource management has spread widely, even to nondemocracies, driven by expectations of beneficial outcomes such as multidirectional learning. However, can we expect participation to be equally effective in achieving multidirectional learning in democracies and nondemocracies? Unsurprisingly, previous studies indicate the relevance of power distribution for learning. Higher levels of repression and accumulation of political capital in nondemocracies should limit the distribution of power across stakeholders. Yet, the relationship between political regime, participation, and learning has rarely been studied empirically. I address this gap by analysing multidirectional learning in stakeholder participation in 81 Man and the Biosphere reserves across 35 countries using ordinary least squares regression, Firth logistic regression, and heat maps. The results suggest that the amount of stakeholders sharing knowledge and learning is similar in both regimes. However, a closer analysis reveals differences in the impact different stakeholders have on the learning process. More concretely, local actors share knowledge more often and have a greater impact on stakeholders' learning in democracies, while state actors display similar behavior across regimes in terms of learning and sharing knowledge. Thus, although there are notable similarities across regimes, multidirectional learning through stakeholder participation is influenced by the political context.

  • 20. Olsson, E. Gunilla A.
    et al.
    Kerselaers, Eva
    Søderkvist Kristensen, Lone
    Primdahl, Jørgen
    Rogge, Elke
    Wästfelt, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Peri-Urban Food Production and Its Relation to Urban Resilience2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 12, article id 1340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Food production on the urban-rural fringe is under pressure due to competing land uses. We discuss the potential to improve resilience for urban-rural regions by enhancing food production as part of multifunctional land use. Through studies of peri-urban land in the regions of Gothenburg (Sweden), Copenhagen (Denmark) and Gent (Belgium), recent developments are analysed. Arable farming has been declining since 2000 in all three areas due to urban expansion and recreational land use changes. In city plans, networks of protected areas and green spaces and their importance for human wellbeing have been acknowledged. Policies for farmland preservation in peri-urban settings exist, but strategies for local food production are not expressed in present planning documents. Among the diversity of peri-urban agricultural activities, peri-urban food production is a developing issue. However, the competing forms of land use and the continuing high dependence of urban food on global food systems and related resource flows reduces peri-urban food production and improvements in urban food security. The positive effects of local food production need to be supported by governance aiming to improve the urban-rural relationship. The paper discusses the resilience potential of connecting urban-rural regions and re-coupling agriculture to regional food production.

  • 21.
    Plummer, Ryan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Brock University, Canada.
    Baird, Julia
    Adaptive Co-Management for Climate Change Adaptation: Considerations for the Barents Region2013In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 629-642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adaptive co-management is a governance approach gaining recognition. It emphasizes pluralism and communication; shared decision-making and authority; linkages within and among levels; actor autonomy; and, learning and adaptation. Adaptive co-management is just starting to be applied for climate change adaptation. In drawing upon adaptive co-management scholarship and a case in progress of application for climate change adaptation in Niagara, Canada, key considerations for the Barents Euro-Arctic Region are identified. Realistic expectations, sensitivity to context, and cultivating conditions for success are highlighted as key considerations for future efforts to implement adaptive co-management approaches in the Barents Region.

  • 22. Shackleton, Charlie M.
    et al.
    Hurley, Patrick T.
    Dahlberg, Annika C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Emery, Marla R.
    Nagendra, Harini
    Urban Foraging: A Ubiquitous Human Practice Overlooked by Urban Planners, Policy, and Research2017In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 9, no 10, article id 1884Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although hardly noticed or formally recognised, urban foraging by humans probably occurs in all urban settings around the world. We draw from research in India, South Africa, Sweden, and the United States to demonstrate the ubiquity and varied nature of urban foraging in different contexts. Across these different contexts, we distil seven themes that characterise and thereby advance thinking about research and the understanding of urban foraging. We show that it is widespread and occurs across a variety of urban spaces and places. The species used and the local practices vary between contexts, and are in constant flux as urban ecological and social settings change. This requires that urban foragers are knowledgeable about diverse species, harvest locations, and rights of access, and that their practices are adaptable to changing contexts. Despite its ubiquity, most cities have some forms of regulations that prohibit or discourage urban foraging. We highlight a few important exceptions that can provide prototypes and lessons for other cities regarding supportive policy frameworks and initiatives. The formulation of dynamic policy, design, and management strategies in support of urban foraging will benefit from understanding the common characteristics of foraging in cities worldwide, but also will require comprehension of the specific and dynamic contexts in which they would be implemented.

  • 23.
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Elmberg, Johan
    A Handshake between Markets and Hierarchies: Geese as an Example of Successful Collaborative Management of Ecosystem Services2015In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 7, no 12, p. 15937-15954Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An important task in research about natural resource management is to communicate the utility of different approaches from various settings. Using ecosystem services as a conceptual frame, we study a local solution to alleviate goose-human conflicts in an agricultural region in Sweden. Increasing goose numbers and crop damage led to the foundation of a goose management group (GMG), comprising landowners, farmers, hunters, ornithologists, conservation NGOs, and local and county level administration. The GMG was not given any formal or legal authority. We asked: is this management solution successful? Which problems can be solved and which remain? Can the GMG stand as a model for management of other species and in other landscapes? We interviewed present members of the GMG and analyzed minutes from its meetings. We found that the GMG has autonomy to self-organize and shows adaptive capacity over time in handling variability and complexity in its socio-ecological system. This makes the GMG a sustainable solution for local management of a resource in which goose population growth and legislation are decided at other (national or international) levels. We assessed what constitutes perceived success and found that GMG is geared toward mediation of opposing preferences by establishing a figurative handshake between stakeholders. By comparing how four general challenges in ecosystem service management align with formative attributes of the GMG, we discuss in which ways this management solution is applicable to other ecosystem services in other contexts.

  • 24.
    Van Holt, Tracy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Weisman, Wendy
    Johnson, Jeffrey C.
    Kall, Sofia
    Whalen, Jack
    Spear, Braddock
    Sousa, Pedro
    A Social Wellbeing in Fisheries Tool (SWIFT) to Help Improve Fisheries Performance2016In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 8, no 8, article id 667Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on a rapid and practical method to assess social dimensions of performance in small-scale and industrial fisheries globally (Social Wellbeing in Fisheries Tool (SWIFT)). SWIFT incorporates aspects of security (fairness and stability of earnings, benefits of employment to local fishing communities, worker protection, and personal safety and health in communities associated with fisheries); flexibility (including opportunity for economic advancement); and the fishery's social viability (including whether the fishery is recruiting new harvesters and diverse age classes of workers, whether women's participation and leadership in global production networks are on an upward trajectory.). We build on resilience research by conceptualizing wellbeing in terms of security, flexibility, and viability, and assessing wellbeing at individual, community, and system levels. SWIFT makes social performance measures more broadly accessible to global production networks, incorporates an everyday understanding of wellbeing for people involved in the seafood industry, and helps put social sustainability into measurable terms that are relevant for businesses.

  • 25.
    Velasquez, Juan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Research in International Migration and Ethnic Relations (CEIFO).
    Grass roots in social urban renewal2011In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, no 4Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 26.
    von Heland, Franciska
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Clifton, Julian
    Olsson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Improving Stewardship of Marine Resources: Linking Strategy to Opportunity2014In: Sustainability, ISSN 2071-1050, E-ISSN 2071-1050, Vol. 6, no 7, p. 4470-4496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The need for improved stewardship of coastal and marine resources is evident worldwide. However, complex ecosystem dynamics, institutional inertia, and budgetary constraints impede such action. This study explores how networks of change-oriented individuals or “institutional entrepreneurs” can introduce new types of human-environment interaction. The focus is on investigating the interplay between the strategies of institutional entrepreneurs and broader system dynamics that shape the context in which they are working, and possible impacts of institutional entrepreneurship on marine governance. We explore these issues in the context of Wakatobi National Park in eastern Indonesia. We suggest that creating links between different social spheres, such as between marine resource management and spirituality or between marine resource management and education, may accelerate the development of a new ecosystem stewardship.  We further suggest that the use of media has significant power to show alternative futures, but that media may also serve to objectify certain resource users and increase the complexity of marine resource management. In general, institutional entrepreneurs play an important role in capturing and managing opportunity to open up space for experimentation and novel ideas, for example by linking their ideas to broader political priorities. Yet, such strategies bear the risk of institutional capture. Finally, institutional entrepreneurs sometimes have vested interests in certain solutions that may forsake experimentation toward a sustainable future.

1 - 26 of 26
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