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  • 1.
    Christidis, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education. The Swedish Red Cross University College, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences Education.
    Subject-Integrated Teaching for Expanded Vocational Knowing and Everyday Situations in a Swedish Upper Secondary Health and Social Care Program2019In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 12, no 3, p. 479-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore what subject-integrated teaching of vocational subjects, ethics and health care, contributed with in terms of vocational knowing. The case study was ethnographically inspired and followed a group of students (16 +) and their teachers in a Swedish Health and Social Care Program while they worked with a theme unit called Death for two weeks in autumn 2012. Data comprised observations, field notes, and audio recordings of the planning and teaching of the theme unit, informal discussions with teachers and students, handouts, a theme booklet, and student assignments. Analysis was based on concepts related to cultural historical activity theory, especially emphasizing rules, tools, actions, operations, and contradictions. Results showed three major objects emphasized in the teacher–student interaction and the tools chosen to support the subject-integrated teaching activity: vocational knowing related to vocational ethics, to everyday ethics, and argumentative skills. Manifestations of contradictions in the form of dilemmas related to the examples that teachers copied from a textbook. As these examples were mainly contextualized in everyday situations, and there are no formal ethical guidelines for nursing assistants on which teachers could rely on, teachers’ narratives were used to complement these examples. Students’ argumentative skills were emphasized and related to personal situations, in which ethical arguments for justification in vocationally relevant situations were made unclear.

  • 2.
    Döös, Marianne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Johansson, Peter
    Wilhelmson, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Organizational learning as an analogy to individual learning? A case of augmented interaction intensity2015In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 55-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper attempts to explore an analogy between individual and organizational learning within experiential learning theory (ELT). The focus is on both the possibility of identifying a learning subject that learns in action, and on the genesis process behind the learning of a suggested learning subject at organizational level. The exploration uses an empirical study of a global software communication organization. The research adopts a qualitative approach, with data from three middle-management layers of a research and development (R&D) unit with 5,000 employees. During the study, shifts of emphasis occurred between two organizational logics, which required work-integrated learning. Metaphorically speaking, the organization was portrayed as ‘teeming with interaction’, and a growing wave of change decisively altered both the thinking and work processes within the organization. The organizational learning process is theoretically understood as an ‘augmented intense interaction’ around a specific content. The subject that learns and upholds the outcome is suggested to be the teeming activity, comprehended as a living organism. In practice, the awareness of an organization as a body that teems with interaction has potential to offer new understanding about how to manage change.

  • 3.
    Gåfvels, Camilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Vision and Embodied Knowing: The Making of Floral Design2016In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 133-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on assessment actions in floristry education, addressing how interaction with flowers influences and mediates vocational knowing. Using video recordings from floristry education for adults, the article explores the interaction between teacher and student when assessing on-going work and performance as a way to frame the teacher’s seeing in situ. Influenced by conversation analysis and moment-by-moment methods ─ including talk, gestures, and flowers as resources ─ the findings contribute to a holistic perspective on vocational floristry knowing. Different features of vocational floristry knowing are detected as part of the content in assessment actions: (i) aesthetic standards reflected in suggestions made by the teacher and student, (ii) financial awareness as a way of seeing flowers, and (iii) the use of context and change of perspective to take the customer into account. The findings demonstrate situated floristry knowing in action, which is displayed when the teacher enables the student to visualise and understand professional vision of flowers, traditions, and standards.

  • 4.
    Tyson, Ruhi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Aesthetic Bildung in Vocational Education: The Biographical Case of Bookbinding Master Wolfgang B. and His Apprenticeship2014In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 345-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present article I will be discussing the importance attributed to aesthetic experiences in the vocational education of bookbinding master Wolfgang B. using the philosophy of Friedrich Schiller both to understand what constitutes these processes and to examine Schiller's thoughts in the light of his recollections. By doing this I hope to elaborate on a potential, and often overlooked, Bildung-related possibility or affordance at least in craft vocational education and training (VET) as well as to articulate a pattern that can be generalized from into other VET contexts. This leads to a richer understanding of the potentials inherent in teaching skills or capabilities and the pedagogy needed to elicit these as opposed to the belief that teaching technique is a straightforward and unambiguous issue of manual practice. These are in the realm of aesthetic and ethical learning potentials (given that such learning is never automatic) as well as in the connections that one might establish to various fields of scientific and cultural knowledge. Through all of this there emerges a partial description of a vocational Bildung tradition that has its roots in the teaching of crafts.

  • 5.
    Tyson, Ruhi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Educating for vocational excellence: The auto/biographical exploration of enacted craft pedagogy2015In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 229-245Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on education for vocational excellence (the combination of virtue and good judgment or phronesis/practical wisdom) through the examination of episodes from the auto/biographical study of master craftsman Wolfgang B. Vocational excellence is an issue sometimes discussed with regard to teacher training for schools and universities, often from an Aristotelian perspective, but less often when it comes to teaching and teacher training in the various models of crafts apprenticeship education that exist. Even though there is no lack of arguments made for the excellence one is able to develop in learning a craft there are fewer takes on how such educational aims have been enacted. This is problematic because teaching vocational knowledge, including excellence, thereby becomes a more tacit practice than it needs to be and more systematic reflection is inhibited.

    I will be considering these problems through the educational biography of a master bookbinder, gilder and engraver, Mr. Wolfgang B., and two stories he tells, one of his education in Paris and one of his own deliberations in teaching bookbinding.

    In doing this I am arguing for a systematic narrative approach to researching and teaching how to teach vocational excellence and by extension more generally with regard to teaching. This not only does justice to the particularity of practical wisdom but also calls attention to the imaginative character of being able to deliberate wisely.

  • 6.
    Tyson, Ruhi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    What is Excellence in Practice? Empirical Explorations of Vocational Bildung and Practical Wisdom through Case Narratives2018In: Vocations and Learning, ISSN 1874-785X, E-ISSN 1874-7868, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 19-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The approach of vocational Bildung didactics has been developed to investigate practical knowledge in matters of education for Bildung and phronesis (practical wisdom). Case narratives of unusual richness or success are at the core of the approach, each case representing an articulation of someone’s practical knowledge. The concept of a practice as developed by MacIntyre is introduced here as a way of situating the practical knowledge of Bildung and phronesis gained from case narratives. A series of case studies are discussed to examine the practices that surfaced. The result is a differentiation of MacIntyre’s concept in two directions: one more specific called vocational practice and one more general called a cultural practice. This differentiation is then applied to the case studies and it is argued that it helps illuminate aspects of them that previously were difficult to comprehend within the framework of vocational Bildung didactics. The conclusion is that biographical cases where cultural and vocational practices intersect are uniquely positioned to afford knowledge of how such intersections have been achieved through education and what they have meant for the person initiated into such matrixes. This, in turn, contributes to the insight with which we are able to design vocational education and training curricula that support initiation into dynamic vocational practices with a focus on the goods and virtues possible to develop through them.

1 - 6 of 6
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