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  • 1.
    Alexander, Steven M.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. National Socio‐Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC), Maryland, USA; University of Waterloo, Canada.
    Staniczenko, Phillip P. A.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Social ties explain catch portfolios of small-scale fishers in the Caribbean2020Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 21, nr 1, s. 120-131Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Small-scale fisheries often involve weak management regimes with limited top-down enforcement of rules and minimal support from legal institutions, making them useful model systems for investigating the role of social influence in determining economic and environmental outcomes. In such regimes, interpersonal relationships are expected to have a strong effect on a fisher's catch portfolio, the set of fish species targeted by an individual fisher. Here, we test three competing hypotheses about social influence using belief propagation network models and show that a peer-to-peer information-sharing social network is key to explaining catch portfolios at a small-scale fishery in Jamaica. We find that experience dictates the direction of influence among fishers in the social network, with older fishers and information brokers having distinct roles in shaping catch patterns for large- and small-sized fish species, respectively. These findings highlight concrete opportunities for harnessing social networks in natural resource management. Our new approach to modelling social influence is applicable to many social-ecological systems with minimal legal and institutional support or those that rely heavily on bottom-up participatory processes.

  • 2.
    Ammar, Yosr
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Voss, Rudi
    Niiranen, Susa
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Blenckner, Thorsten
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Quantifying socio-economic novelty in fisheries social-ecological systems2022Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 23, nr 2, s. 445-461Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Socio-economic development has shaped fisheries social-ecological systems (SES) worldwide across different scales. No work has yet undertaken how this development led to novel, not experienced before, systems structure in marine SES. Here, we quantify socio-economic novelty as the degree of dissimilarity relative to a specific spatiotemporal baseline in the Baltic Sea fisheries SES between 1975 and 2015. We used catch by "gears," catch by "commercial groups" and trade ("import" and "export") as respective indicators of novelty at national, regional and international governance levels. We found that socio-economic novelty increased over time nonlinearly in relation to the 1975–1979 baseline. The contribution to total novelty shifted from the dominance of “gears” and “commercial groups” in the late 1990s and early 2000s to “import” and “export” after the mid-2000s, i.e. from national and regional levels to the international level. The fastest increase in novelty occurred with the trade dominance shift, primarily related to monetary value rather than quantity. Spatially, novelty emerged with a large difference across countries, and a major contribution by Sweden, Denmark and Poland. We identified the influence of different management interventions and governance actions on the emergence of novelty in the Baltic SES. The decreasing socio-economic novelty at national and regional levels could indicate reduced variability due to management intervention in recent years which might decrease SES resilience to shocks. Calculating socio-economic novelty and studying its drivers at different scales could provide a better understanding of SES complexity and inform urgently needed adaptation and transformation towards sustainable future pathways. 

  • 3.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Birnbaum, Simon
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen. Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm.
    Björkvik, Emma
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    The quality of compliance: investigating fishers' responses towards regulation and authorities2017Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 18, nr 4, s. 682-697Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    A substantial amount of scientific effort goes into understanding and measuring compliance in fisheries. Understanding why, how and when fishers follow or violate rules is crucial for designing effective fishery policies that can halt overfishing. Non-compliance was initially explained almost exclusively with reference to economic and self-interested motivations. More recently, however, most explanations involve a combination of economic, social, political and environmental factors. Despite this recent development towards more holistic explanations, many scientists continue to frame the issue in binary terms: fishers either follow rules, or they don't. In this article we challenge this binary interpretation and focus attention on the diversity of fishers' dispositions and perceptions that underpin compliant behaviour. To this aim we construct a typology of fishers' responses towards regulation and authorities, thereby developing conceptual tools to understand different motivations and attitudes that underlie compliance outcomes. For this purpose, we identify the motivational postures of 'creativity' and 'reluctance', and then highlight their empirical relevance with an interview study of Swedish fishers. Reasons for studying the quality and diversity of fishers' motivations and responses are not purely academic. Conceptualizing and observing the quality of compliance can help policymakers and managers gauge and anticipate the potentiality of non-compliant fishing practices that may threaten the resilience of marine ecosystems.

  • 4.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Oslo, Norway.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Classifying fishers' behaviour. An invitation to fishing styles2016Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 78-100Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The study and classification of fishers’ behaviour remains a much debated topic. There is a tension between detailed empirical studies, which highlight the variety and diversity of fisheries, and the parsimony and generalization required to satisfy science and policy demands. This study contributes to this debate. The first sec- tion reviews quantitative methods currently used for classifying fishing practices. The review uncovers significant weaknesses in quantitative classification methods, which, we argue, can be improved through the complementary use of qualitative methods. To this purpose, we introduce the concept of ‘fishing style’, which integrates quantitative classification methods with qualitative analysis. We explain the scientific premises of the fishing-style concept, outline a general methodological framework and present a fishing-style analysis of Swedish Baltic Sea fisheries. Based on these results, we conclude that it is possible to classify fishing practices in a rel- atively uniform and limited number of styles that can highlight the rich, empirical diversity of fishers’ behaviour. We therefore propose that fishing-style analysis, based on an integration of quantitative and qualitative methods, can be an impor- tant step towards more effective and sustainable fisheries management.

  • 5.
    Crona, Beatrice I.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Daw, Tim M.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of East Anglia, UK.
    Swartz, Wilf
    Norström, Albert V.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Nyström, Magnus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Thyresson, Matilda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Deutsch, Lisa
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Troell, Max
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Masked, diluted and drowned out: how global seafood trade weakens signals from marine ecosystems2016Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 17, nr 4, s. 1175-1182Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Nearly 40% of seafood is traded internationally and an even bigger proportion is affected by international trade, yet scholarship on marine fisheries has focused on global trends in stocks and catches, or on dynamics of individual fisheries, with limited attention to the link between individual fisheries, global trade and distant consumers. This paper examines the usefulness of fish price as a feedback signal to consumers about the state of fisheries and marine ecosystems. We suggest that the current nature of fisheries systems and global markets prevent transmission of such price signals from source fisheries to consumers. We propose several mechanisms that combine to weaken price signals, and present one example - the North Sea cod - to show how these mechanisms can be tested. The lack of a reliable price feedback to consumers represents a challenge for sustainable fisheries governance. We therefore propose three complimentary approaches to address the missing feedback: (i) strengthening information flow through improved traceability and visibility of individual fishers to consumers, (ii) capitalizing on the changing seafood trade structures and (iii) bypassing and complementing market mechanisms by directly targeting citizens and political actors regarding marine environmental issues through publicity and information campaigns. These strategies each havelimitations and thus need to be pursued together to address the challenge of sustainability in global marine fisheries.

  • 6. Defeo, Omar
    et al.
    Castrejon, Mauricio
    Perez-Castaneda, Roberto
    Castilla, Juan C.
    Gutierrez, Nicolas L.
    Essington, Timothy E.
    Folke, Carl
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Beijer Institute, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Co-management in Latin American small-scale shellfisheries: assessment from long-term case studies2016Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 17, nr 1, s. 176-192Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Co-management (Co-M), defined as the sharing of management tasks and responsibilities between governments and local users, is emerging as a powerful institutional arrangement to redress fisheries paradigm failures, yet long-term assessments of its performance are lacking. A comparative analysis of five small-scale Latin American shellfisheries was conducted to identify factors suggesting success and failure. In Chile, Uruguay and Mexico Co-M produced positive effects, including stabilization of landings at low levels, increase in abundance, CPUE, unit prices and revenues per unit of effort, and reduced interannual variability in several fishery indicators, particularly in landings. Co-M was successful because it was mainly bottom-up implemented and accompanied by-catch shares (spatial property rights and community quotas). By contrast, Co-M implementation was unable to prevent the collapse of the Galapagos sea cucumber fishery, as reflected by a decrease in abundance and CPUE. Negative effects were also observed in the Galapagos spiny lobster fishery during Co-M implementation. However, recovery was observed in recent years, reflected in a stabilization of fishing effort and the highest CPUE and economic revenues observed since the beginning of the Co-M implementation phase. The combined effects of market forces, climate variability and a moratorium on fishing effort were critical in fishery recovery. We conclude that Co-M is not a blueprint that can be applied to all shellfisheries to enhance their governability. These social-ecological systems need to be managed by jointly addressing problems related to the resources, their marine environment and the people targeting them, accounting for their socioeconomic and cultural contexts.

  • 7.
    Eriksson, Hampus
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. University of Sydney, Australia.
    Byrne, Maria
    The sea cucumber fishery in Australia's Great Barrier Reef Marine Park follows global patterns of serial exploitation2015Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 16, nr 2, s. 329-341Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Tropical sea cucumber fisheries follow a predictable pattern of serial depletion. Overfishing is exacerbated in developing countries where management systems lack capacity to control large numbers of fishers influenced by poverty. In contrast, the tropical sea cucumber fishery in Australia's World Heritage listed Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBRMP) is operating in a developed high-income country with relatively few licensed fishers to manage. The development of this fishery is reviewed here in a meta-analysis of catches from 1991 to 2011. The fishery expanded to replace high-value teatfish species (Holothuria whitmaei and H.fuscogilva), fished heavily in initial stages of the fishery, with newly commercialized medium-value species such as burying blackfish (Actinopyga spinea) and curryfish (Stichopus herrmanni). These two species now constitute 80% of total catch. The annual average catch of burying blackfish was 208tonnes years 2004-11 and curryfish catches increased rapidly at an average annual pace of 200% from 2007-11. This serial harvest pattern occurred in the absence of baseline studies and without independent resource assessments, information required to inform relevant harvest predictions and to determine fishery impacts. This situation does not support ecologically relevant and adaptive decision-making in management and the unfolding catch patterns in the GBRMP follow those in low-income developing countries. The missing knowledge and lack of data serve as arguments to support precautionary reductions in harvests and extending fallow periods in fishing zones.

  • 8. Friedman, Kim
    et al.
    Eriksson, Hampus
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Systemekologiska institutionen.
    Tardy, Emmanuel
    Pakoa, Kalo
    Management of sea cucumber stocks: patterns of vulnerability and recovery of sea cucumber stocks impacted by fishing2011Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 12, nr 1, s. 75-93Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Identifying rates of change in the abundance of sea cucumbers under differing management regimes is fundamental to estimating commercial yields, identifying ecological interactions and facilitating management. Here, we review the status of sea cucumber stocks from a range of Pacific Island countries (Samoa, Tonga, Palau, Fiji and Papua New Guinea), some of which have had a moratorium on exports for up to a decade. We use a time-series approach to look at variation in sea cucumber presence, coverage and density from survey and re-survey data. Results give an appreciation of variation between 'high' status (less impacted) and depleted stocks. Survey data show marked declines in coverage and abundance as a result of artisanal fishing activity, and although species groups were not lost at a country level, local extirpation and range restriction was noted. Resilience and 'recovery' following cessation of fishing varied greatly, both among locations and among the species targeted. Worryingly, even after extended periods of moratorium, the density of some species was markedly low. In many cases, the densities were too low for commercial fishing, and may be at a level where the effective population size is constrained due to 'Allee' affects. From these results, we suggest that management regimes presently employed are generally not well aligned with the level of response to fishing mortality that can be expected from sea cucumber stocks. New adaptive, precautionary approaches to management are suggested, which would allow more timely interventions to be made, while refined information on stock dynamics is sought.

  • 9. Fulton, Christopher J.
    et al.
    Berkström, Charlotte
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Wilson, Shaun K.
    Abesamis, Rene A.
    Bradley, Michael
    Åkerlund, Carolina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Barrett, Luke T.
    Bucol, Abner A.
    Chacin, Dinorah H.
    Chong-Seng, Karen M.
    Coker, Darren J.
    Depczynski, Martial
    Eggertsen, Linda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Eggertsen, Maria
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Ellis, David
    Evans, Richard D.
    Graham, Nicholas A. J.
    Hoey, Andrew S.
    Holmes, Thomas H.
    Kulbicki, Michel
    Leung, Priscilla T. Y.
    Lam, Paul K. S.
    van Lier, Joshua
    Matis, Paloma A.
    Noble, Mae M.
    Perez-Matus, Alejandro
    Piggott, Camilla
    Radford, Ben T.
    Tano, Stina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Tinkler, Paul
    Macroalgal meadow habitats support fish and fisheries in diverse tropical seascapes2020Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 21, nr 4, s. 700-717Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Canopy-forming macroalgae can construct extensive meadow habitats in tropical seascapes occupied by fishes that span a diversity of taxa, life-history stages and ecological roles. Our synthesis assessed whether these tropical macroalgal habitats have unique fish assemblages, provide fish nurseries and support local fisheries. We also applied a meta-analysis of independent surveys across 23 tropical reef locations in 11 countries to examine how macroalgal canopy condition is related to the abundance of macroalgal-associated fishes. Over 627 fish species were documented in tropical macroalgal meadows, with 218 of these taxa exhibiting higher local abundance within this habitat (cf. nearby coral reef) during at least one life-history stage. Major overlap (40%-43%) in local fish species richness among macroalgal and seagrass or coral reef habitats suggest macroalgal meadows may provide an important habitat refuge. Moreover, the prominence of juvenile fishes suggests macroalgal meadows facilitate the triphasic life cycle of many fishes occupying diverse tropical seascapes. Correlations between macroalgal canopy structure and juvenile abundance suggests macroalgal habitat condition can influence levels of replenishment in tropical fish populations, including the majority of macroalgal-associated fishes that are targeted by commercial, subsistence or recreational fisheries. While many macroalgal-associated fishery species are of minor commercial value, their local importance for food and livelihood security can be substantial (e.g. up to 60% of landings in Kenyan reef fisheries). Given that macroalgal canopy condition can vary substantially with sea temperature, there is a high likelihood that climate change will impact macroalgal-associated fish and fisheries.

  • 10.
    Lindkvist, Emilie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Pellowe, Kara E.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Maine, USA.
    Alexander, Steven M.
    Drury O'Neill, Elizabeth
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Finkbeiner, Elena M.
    Girón-Nava, Alfredo
    González-Mon, Blanca
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Johnson, Andrew F.
    Pittman, Jeremy
    Schill, Caroline
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Sweden.
    Wijermans, Nanda
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Bodin, Örjan
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gelcich, Stefan
    Glaser, Marion
    Untangling social–ecological interactions: A methods portfolio approach to tackling contemporary sustainability challenges in fisheries2022Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 23, nr 5, s. 1202-1220Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Meeting the objectives of sustainable fisheries management requires attention to the complex interactions between humans, institutions and ecosystems that give rise to fishery outcomes. Traditional approaches to studying fisheries often do not fully capture, nor focus on these complex interactions between people and ecosystems. Despite advances in the scope and scale of interactions encompassed by more holistic methods, for example ecosystem-based fisheries management approaches, no single method can adequately capture the complexity of human–nature interactions. Approaches that combine quantitative and qualitative analytical approaches are necessary to generate a deeper understanding of these interactions and illuminate pathways to address fisheries sustainability challenges. However, combining methods is inherently challenging and requires understanding multiple methods from different, often disciplinarily distinct origins, demanding reflexivity of the researchers involved. Social–ecological systems’ research has a history of utilising combinations of methods across the social and ecological realms to account for spatial and temporal dynamics, uncertainty and feedbacks that are key components of fisheries. We describe several categories of analytical methods (statistical modelling, network analysis, dynamic modelling, qualitative analysis and controlled behavioural experiments) and highlight their applications in fisheries research, strengths and limitations, data needs and overall objectives. We then discuss important considerations of a methods portfolio development process, including reflexivity, epistemological and ontological concerns and illustrate these considerations via three case studies. We show that, by expanding their methods portfolios, researchers will be better equipped to study the complex interactions shaping fisheries and contribute to solutions for sustainable fisheries management.

  • 11.
    Mtwana Nordlund, Lina
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Unsworth, Richard K. F.
    Gullström, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Cullen-Unsworth, Leanne C.
    Global significance of seagrass fishery activity2018Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 19, nr 3, s. 399-412Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Seagrass meadows support fisheries through provision of nursery areas and trophic subsidies to adjacent habitats. As shallow coastal habitats, they also provide key fishing grounds; however, the nature and extent of such exploitation are poorly understood. These productive meadows are being degraded globally at rapid rates. For degradation to cease, there needs to be better appreciation for the value of these habitats in supporting global fisheries. Here, we provide the first global scale study demonstrating the extent, importance and nature of fisheries exploitation of seagrass meadows. Due to a paucity of available data, the study used a global expert survey to demonstrate the widespread significance of seagrass-based fishing activity. Our study finds that seagrass-based fisheries are globally important and present virtually wherever seagrass exists, supporting subsistence, commercial and recreational activity. A wide range of fishing methods and gear is used reflecting the spatial distribution patterns of seagrass meadows, and their depth ranges from intertidal (accessible by foot) to relatively deep water (where commercial trawls can operate). Seagrass meadows are multispecies fishing grounds targeted by fishers for any fish or invertebrate species that can be eaten, sold or used as bait. In the coastal communities of developing countries, the importance of the nearshore seagrass fishery for livelihoods and well-being is irrefutable. In developed countries, the seagrass fishery is often recreational and/or more target species specific. Regardless of location, this study is the first to highlight collectively the indiscriminate nature and global scale of seagrass fisheries and the diversity of exploitative methods employed to extract seagrass-associated resources. Evidence presented emphasizes the need for targeted management to support continued viability of seagrass meadows as a global ecosystem service provider.

  • 12. Nielsen, Rasmus J.
    et al.
    Thunberg, Eric
    Holland, Daniel S.
    Schmidt, Jorn O.
    Fulton, Elizabeth A.
    Bastardie, Francois
    Punt, Andre E.
    Allen, Icarus
    Bartelings, Heleen
    Bertignac, Michel
    Bethke, Eckhard
    Bossier, Sieme
    Buckworth, Rick
    Carpenter, Griffin
    Christensen, Asbjorn
    Christensen, Villy
    Da-Rocha, José M.
    Deng, Roy
    Dichmont, Catherine
    Doering, Ralf
    Esteban, Aniol
    Fernandes, Jose A.
    Frost, Hans
    Garcia, Dorleta
    Gasche, Loic
    Gascuel, Didier
    Gourguet, Sophie
    Groeneveld, Rolf A.
    Guillén, Jordi
    Guyader, Olivier
    Hamon, Katell G.
    Hoff, Ayoe
    Horbowy, Jan
    Hutton, Trevor
    Lehuta, Sigrid
    Little, Richard L.
    Lleonart, Jordi
    Macher, Claire
    Mackinson, Steven
    Mahevas, Stephanie
    Marchal, Paul
    Mato-Amboage, Rosa
    Mapstone, Bruce
    Maynou, Francesc
    Merzéréaud, Mathieu
    Palacz, Artur
    Pascoe, Sean
    Paulrud, Anton
    Plaganyi, Eva
    Prellezo, Raul
    van Putten, Elizabeth I.
    Quaas, Martin
    Ravn-Jonsen, Lars
    Sanchez, Sonia
    Simons, Sarah
    Thébaud, Olivier
    Tomczak, Maciej T.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholms universitets Östersjöcentrum.
    Ulrich, Clara
    van Dijk, Diana
    Vermard, Youen
    Voss, Rudi
    Waldo, Staffan
    Integrated ecological–economic fisheries models—Evaluation, review and challenges for implementation2018Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 19, nr 1, s. 1-29Artikel, forskningsöversikt (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine ecosystems evolve under many interconnected and area-specific pressures. To fulfil society's intensifying and diversifying needs while ensuring ecologically sustainable development, more effective marine spatial planning and broader-scope management of marine resources is necessary. Integrated ecological–economic fisheries models (IEEFMs) of marine systems are needed to evaluate impacts and sustainability of potential management actions and understand, and anticipate ecological, economic and social dynamics at a range of scales from local to national and regional. To make these models most effective, it is important to determine how model characteristics and methods of communicating results influence the model implementation, the nature of the advice that can be provided and the impact on decisions taken by managers. This article presents a global review and comparative evaluation of 35 IEEFMs applied to marine fisheries and marine ecosystem resources to identify the characteristics that determine their usefulness, effectiveness and implementation. The focus is on fully integrated models that allow for feedbacks between ecological and human processes although not all the models reviewed achieve that. Modellers must invest more time to make models user friendly and to participate in management fora where models and model results can be explained and discussed. Such involvement is beneficial to all parties, leading to improvement of models and more effective implementation of advice, but demands substantial resources which must be built into the governance process. It takes time to develop effective processes for using IEEFMs requiring a long-term commitment to integrating multidisciplinary modelling advice into management decision-making.

  • 13.
    Oostdijk, Maartje
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för naturgeografi. University of Iceland, Iceland; World Maritime University, Sweden.
    Carpenter, Griffin
    Which attributes of fishing opportunities are linked to sustainable fishing?2022Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 23, nr 6, s. 1469-1484Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    To prevent the overfishing of marine fish populations, governments often limit fishing access through the allocation of fishing opportunities. While some studies have linked particular systems of fishing opportunities to sustainable outcomes (particularly individual transferable quota), it remains unclear whether it is the use of exclusive access (individual allocation), the use of a market (tradability), the duration of this access or the quota limits themselves that drive the sustainable outcomes. To determine which attributes of fishing opportunities are associated with sustainable fishing, we developed a novel method to systematically classify how fishing opportunities are allocated for 443 global fish stocks from 1990 to 2018 to produce the longest and most comprehensive dataset and longitudinal study of its kind. Our results revealed that quota limits and individual allocation are linked to a reduced probability of overfishing, with the most robust result for quota limits. No attributes were robustly linked to a reduced probability of overfished biomass. Whereas some previous studies have found that systems with market-based features or strong property rights (i.e. a long duration) were linked to sustainable fishing, these benefits were found to be small or not significant once proper controls for other system attributes were introduced. These results highlight the importance of considering all attributes of institutional design in the governance of common pool resources.  

  • 14. Pauly, Daniel
    et al.
    Belhabib, Dyhia
    Blomeyer, Roland
    Cheung, William W. W. L.
    Cisneros-Montemayor, Andres M.
    Copeland, Duncan
    Harper, Sarah
    Lam, Vicky W. Y.
    Mai, Yining
    Le Manach, Frederic
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Mok, Ka Man
    van der Meer, Liesbeth
    Sanz, Antonio
    Shon, Soohyun
    Sumaila, U. Rashid
    Swartz, Wilf
    Watson, Reg
    Zhai, Yunlei
    Zeller, Dirk
    China's distant-water fisheries in the 21st century2014Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 15, nr 3, s. 474-488Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    We conservatively estimate the distant-water fleet catch of the People's Republic of China for 2000-2011, using a newly assembled database of reported occurrence of Chinese fishing vessels in various parts of the world and information on the annual catch by vessel type. Given the unreliability of official statistics, uncertainty of results was estimated through a regionally stratified Monte Carlo approach, which documents the presence and number of Chinese vessels in Exclusive Economic Zones and then multiplies these by the expected annual catch per vessel. We find that China, which over-reports its domestic catch, substantially under-reports the catch of its distant-water fleets. This catch, estimated at 4.6 million t year(-1) (95% central distribution, 3.4-6.1 million t year(-1)) from 2000 to 2011 (compared with an average of 368 000 t year(-1) reported by China to FAO), corresponds to an ex-vessel landed value of 8.93 billion year(-1) (95% central distribution, 6.3-12.3 billion). Chinese distant-water fleets extract the largest catch in African waters (3.1 million t year(-1), 95% central distribution, 2.0-4.4 million t), followed by Asia (1.0 million t year(-1), 0.56-1.5 million t), Oceania (198 000 t year(-1), 144 000-262 000 t), Central and South America (182 000 t year-1, 94 000299 000 t) and Antarctica (48 000 t year(-1), 8 000-129 000 t). The uncertainty of these estimates is relatively high, but several sources of inaccuracy could not be fully resolved given the constraints inherent in the underlying data and method, which also prevented us from distinguishing between legal and illegal catch.

  • 15. Planque, Benjamin
    et al.
    Mullon, Christian
    Arneberg, Per
    Eide, Arne
    Fromentin, Jean-Marc
    Heymans, Johanna Jacomina
    Hoel, Alf Håkon
    Niiranen, Susa
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Ottersen, Geir
    Sandø, Anne Britt
    Sommerkorn, Martin
    Thébaud, Olivier
    Thorvik, Thorbjørn
    A participatory scenario method to explore the future of marine social-ecological systems2019Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 20, nr 3, s. 434-451Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Anticipating future changes in marine social-ecological systems (MSES) several decades into the future is essential in the context of accelerating global change. This is challenging in situations where actors do not share common understandings, practices, or visions about the future. We introduce a dedicated scenario method for the development of MSES scenarios in a participatory context. The objective is to allow different actors to jointly develop scenarios which contain their multiple visions of the future. The method starts from four perspectives: fisheries management, ecosystem, ocean climate, and global context and governance for which current status and recent trends are summarized. Contrasted scenarios about possible futures are elaborated for each of the four single perspectives before being integrated into multiple-perspective scenarios. Selected scenarios are then developed into storylines. Focusing on individual perspectives until near the end allows actors with diverse cultures, interests and horizons to confront their own notions of the future. We illustrate the method with the exploration of the futures of the Barents Sea MSES by 2050. We emphasize the following lessons learned: first, many actors are not familiar with scenario building and attention must be paid to explaining the purpose, methodology, and benefits of scenarios exercises. Second, although the Barents Sea MSES is relatively well understood, uncertainties about its future are significant. Third, it is important to focus on unlikely events. Fourth, all perspectives should be treated equally. Fifth, as MSES are continuously changing, we can only be prepared for future changes if we collectively keep preparing.

  • 16. Post, Søren
    et al.
    Werner, Karl Michael
    Núñez-Riboni, Ismael
    Chafik, Léon
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Meteorologiska institutionen (MISU).
    Hátún, Hjálmar
    Jansen, Teunis
    Subpolar gyre and temperature drive boreal fish abundance in Greenland waters2021Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 22, nr 1, s. 161-174Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    As result of ocean warming, marine boreal species have shifted their distribution poleward, with increases in abundance at higher latitudes, and declines in abundance at lower latitudes. A key to predict future changes in fish communities is to understand how fish stocks respond to climate variability. Scattered field observations in the first half of the 20th century suggested that boreal fish may coherently invade Greenland waters when temperatures rise, but this hypothesis has remained untested. Therefore, we studied how local temperature variability and the dynamics of the subpolar gyre, a large-scale driver of oceanic conditions in the North Atlantic, affect abundance of boreal fishes in a region that sharply defines their lower thermal boundary. We analysed information from demersal trawl surveys from 1981 to 2017, for species distributed from shallow shelf to depths of 1,500 m, collected at over 10,000 stations along similar to 3,000 km of Greenland. Our results show that local temperature and variability of Labrador and Irminger Sea water in the subpolar gyre region drive interdecadal variability of boreal fish abundance in Greenland waters. Although temperature fluctuations were higher in shallow than deep regions, fish abundance changed as quickly in great depths as in shallow depths. This link between physics and biology provides an opportunity for prediction of future trends, which is of utility in Greenland, where fisheries constitute more than 90% of the national export value.

  • 17.
    Spijkers, Jessica
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. James Cook University, Australia.
    Morrison, Tiffany H.
    Blasiak, Robert
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. The University of Tokyo, Japan.
    Cumming, Graeme S.
    Osborne, Matthew
    Watson, James
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Marine fisheries and future ocean conflict2018Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 19, nr 5, s. 798-806Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Conflict over marine fishery resources is a growing security concern. Experts expect that global changes in our climate, food systems and oceans may spark or exacerbate resource conflicts. An initial scan of 803 relevant papers and subsequent intensive review of 31 fisheries conflict studies, focused on subnational and international conflicts, suggests that four substantial scientific gaps need addressing to improve our understanding of the nature and drivers of fisheries conflict. First, fisheries conflict and levels of conflict intensity are not precisely defined. Second, complex adaptive systems thinking is underutilized but has the potential to produce more realistic causal models of fishery conflict. Third, comparative large-scale data and suitably integrative methodologies are lacking, underscoring the need for a standardized and comparable database of fisheries conflict cases to aid extrapolation beyond single case-studies. Fourth, there is room for a more widespread application of higher order concepts and associated terminology. Importantly, the four gaps highlight the homogenized nature of current methodological and theoretical approaches to understanding fishery conflict, which potentially presents us with an oversimplified understanding of these conflicts. A more nuanced understanding of the complex and dynamic nature of fishery conflict and its causes is not only scientifically critical, but increasingly relevant for policymakers and practitioners in this turbulent world.

  • 18.
    Spijkers, Jessica
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. James Cook University, Australia.
    Singh, Gerald G.
    Wabnitz, Colette C. C.
    Österblom, Henrik
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Cumming, Graeme S.
    Morrison, Tiffany H.
    Identifying predictors of international fisheries conflict2021Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 22, nr 4, s. 834-850Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Marine capture fishery resources are declining, and demand for them is rising. These trends are suspected to incite conflict, but their effects have not been quantitatively examined. We applied a multi-model ensemble approach to a global database of international fishery conflicts between 1974 and 2016 to test the supply-induced scarcity hypothesis (diminishing supplies of fishery resources increase fisheries conflict), the demand-induced scarcity hypothesis (rising demand for fishery resources increases fisheries conflict), and three alternative political and economic hypotheses. While no single indicator was able to fully explain international conflict over fishery resources, we found a positive relationship between increased conflict over fishery resources and higher levels of per capita GDP for the period 1975-1996. For the period 1997-2016, we found evidence supporting the demand-induced scarcity hypothesis, and the notion that an increase in supply of fishery resources is linked to an increase in conflict occurrence. By identifying significant predictors of international fisheries conflict, our analysis provides useful information for policy approaches for conflict anticipation and management.

  • 19.
    Wijermans, Nanda
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Boonstra, Wiebren J.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Orach, Kirill
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Hentati-Sundberg, Jonas
    Schlüter, Maja
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Behavioural diversity in fishing-Towards a next generation of fishery models2020Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 21, nr 5, s. 872-890Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite improved knowledge and stricter regulations, numerous fish stocks remain overharvested. Previous research has shown that fisheries management may fail when the models and assessments used to inform management are based on unrealistic assumptions regarding fishers' decision-making and responses to policies. Improving the understanding of fisher behaviour requires addressing its diversity and complexity through the integration of social science knowledge into modelling. In our paper, we review and synthesize state-of-the-art research on both social science's understanding of fisher behaviour and the representation of fisher decision-making in scientific models. We then develop and experiment with an agent-based social-ecological fisheries model that formalizes three different fishing styles. Thereby we reflect on the implications of our incorporation of behavioural diversity and contrast it with the predominant assumption in fishery models: fishing practices being driven by rational profit maximizing. We envision a next generation of fisheries models and management that account for social scientific knowledge on individual and collective human behaviours. Through our agent-based model, we demonstrate how such an integration is possible and propose a scientific approach for reducing uncertainty based on human behavioural diversity in fisheries. This study serves to lay the foundations for a next generation of social-ecological fishery models that account for human behavioural diversity and social and ecological complexity that are relevant for a realistic assessment and management of fishery sustainability problems.

  • 20. Wilson, Shaun K.
    et al.
    Fulton, Christopher J.
    Graham, Nicholas A. J.
    Abesamis, Rene A.
    Berkström, Charlotte
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden.
    Coker, Darren J.
    Depczynski, Martial
    Evans, Richard D.
    Fisher, Rebecca
    Goetze, Jordan
    Hoey, Andrew
    Holmes, Thomas H.
    Kulbicki, Michel
    Noble, Mae
    Robinson, James P. W.
    Bradley, Michael
    Åkerlund, Carolina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Barrett, Luke T.
    Bucol, Abner A.
    Birt, Matthew J.
    Chacin, Dinorah H.
    Chong-Seng, Karen M.
    Eggertsen, Linda
    Eggertsen, Maria
    Ellis, David
    Leung, Priscilla T. Y.
    Lam, Paul K. S.
    van Lier, Joshua
    Matis, Paloma A.
    Pérez-Matus, Alejandro
    Piggott, Camilla V. H.
    Radford, Ben T.
    Tano, Stina
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Tinkler, Paul
    The contribution of macroalgae-associated fishes to small-scale tropical reef fisheries2022Ingår i: Fish and Fisheries, ISSN 1467-2960, E-ISSN 1467-2979, Vol. 23, nr 4, s. 847-861Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Macroalgae-dominated reefs are a prominent habitat in tropical seascapes that support a diversity of fishes, including fishery target species. To what extent, then, do macroalgal habitats contribute to small-scale tropical reef fisheries? To address this question we: (1) Quantified the macroalgae-associated fish component in catches from 133 small-scale fisheries, (2) Compared life-history traits relevant to fishing (e.g. growth, longevity) in macroalgal and coral-associated fishes, (3) Examined how macroalgae-associated species can influence catch diversity, trophic level and vulnerability and (4) Explored how tropical fisheries change with the expansion of macroalgal habitats using a case study of fishery-independent data for Seychelles. Fish that utilised macroalgal habitats comprise 24% of the catch, but very few fished species relied entirely on macroalgal or coral habitats post-settlement. Macroalgal and coral-associated fishes had similar life-history traits, although vulnerability to fishing declined with increasing contribution of macroalgae association to the catch, whilst mean trophic level and diversity peaked when macroalgal-associated fish accounted for 20%–30% of catches. The Seychelles case study revealed similar total fish biomass on macroalgal and coral reefs, although the biomass of primary target species increased as macroalgae cover expanded. Our findings reinforce that multiple habitat types are needed to support tropical fishery stability and sustainability. Whilst coral habitats have been the focus of tropical fisheries management, we show the potential for macroalgae-associated fish to support catch size and diversity in ways that reduce vulnerability to overfishing. This is pertinent to seascapes where repeated disturbances are facilitating the replacement of coral reef with macroalgal habitats.

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