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  • 1.
    Andersson, Gunnar
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Kolk, Martin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Trends in Childbearing, Marriage and Divorce in Sweden: An Update with Data up to 20122015In: Finnish Yearbook of Population Research, ISSN 1796-6183, E-ISSN 1796-6191, Vol. 50, p. 21-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present an update of the main and parity-specific trends in vital family-demographic behavior in Sweden presented in Finnish Yearbook of Population Research 2011. Based on Swedish register data, previous time series of relative risks of childbearing, marriage, and divorce by calendar year are updated with another five years of observation. We demonstrate that more than a decade of increasing fertility levels turned into moderate fertility declines in 2011. This trend change pertains to all main birth orders. Marriage propensities continued to increase for mothers but stagnated for the childless. Since the turn of the century, trends in divorce risks seem to have leveled off, altogether reflecting a more prevalent role of marriage in recent Swedish family dynamics.

  • 2.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Goldscheider, Frances
    Ambivalence about Children in the Family Building Process in Sweden2014In: Finnish Yearbook of Population Research, ISSN 1796-6183, E-ISSN 1796-6191, Vol. 49, p. 57-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden provides strong support for childbearing and parenthood, including generously subsidizd medical, maternal, and child care, paid parental leave, and child allowances. In this context, attitudes towards parenthood are likely to have a particularly strong impact on the decision about whether and when to have children. We examine the links between first births and holding attitudes about children, not just of positive and negative attitudes, but also of ambivalence, namely those who both value children but also value the things that compete with parenthood for young adults' time and resources. Our analysis shows, measuring attitudes before the transition to parenthood, that ambivalence about childbearing delays the transition to parenthood, but not nearly as much as holding purely negative attitudes. Further, reporting an ambivalent experience from the first child had no significant effect on further childbearing, which testifies to the strong two-child norm in Sweden.

  • 3.
    Thalberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Does Money Matter? Childbearing Behaviour of Swedish Students in the 1980's and 1990's2011In: Finnish Yearbook of Population Research, ISSN 1796-6183, E-ISSN 1796-6191, p. 5-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Education is considered to be one of the primary factors behind postponement of childbearing, as students have significantly lower fertility than non-students of the same age. The low fertility of students may have many different explanations. This study focus on the impact of economic and policy factors on the relationship between study enrolment and childbearing in Sweden. Using longitudinal data it is examined whether the student financial aid reform of 1989 had any effect on female students’ childbearing behaviour and whether female students’ relative childbearing propensities change when controlling for their earned income. The results show that the reform had no noticeable impact on students’ childbearing behaviour. However, first birth risks for female students in all age groups are clearly related to earnings, indicating that low fertility of students is, to some degree, a matter of economic constraints.

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