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  • 1. Felizeter, Sebastian
    et al.
    McLachlan, Michael S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    De Voogt, Pim
    Root Uptake and Trans location of Perfluorinated Alkyl Acids by Three Hydroponically Grown Crops2014In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 62, no 15, p. 3334-3342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tomato, cabbage, and zucchini plants were grown hydroponically in a greenhouse. They were exposed to 14 perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) at four different concentrations via the nutrient solution. At maturity the plants were harvested, and the roots, stems, leaves, twigs (where applicable), and edible parts (tomatoes, cabbage head, zucchinis) were analyzed separately. Uptake and transfer factors were calculated for all plant parts to assess PFAA translocation and distribution within the plants. Root concentration factors were highest for long-chain PFAAs (>C11) in all three plant species, but these chemicals were not found in the edible parts. All other PFAAs were present in all above-ground plant parts, with transpiration stream concentration factors (sTSCFs) of 0.05-0.25. These PFAAs are taken up with the transpiration stream and accumulate primarily in the leaves. Although some systematic differences were observed, overall their uptake from nutrient solution to roots and their further distribution within the plants were similar between plant species and among PFAAs.

  • 2.
    Jensen, Sören
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Lindqvist, Dennis
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Asplund, Lillemor
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Applied Environmental Science (ITM).
    Lipid extraction and determination of halogenated phenols and alkylphenols as their pentafluorobenzoyl derivatives in marine organisms2009In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 57, no 13, p. 5872-5877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A method was developed for the extraction of lipids and analysis of halogenated phenols and alkylphenols in marine organisms. The extraction efficiency was evaluated by comparing the extractable lipid content and the recovery of 13 added phenols from three different marine species (herring, cod, and blue mussel), with the corresponding results from three well-established extraction procedures, the Bligh and Dyer (B&D), the Smedes (S), and the Jensen (J) methods. The J method and the new method, Jensen centrifugation (Jc), gave phenol recoveries of 80-100% for all species, whereas the B&D and S methods gave relatively low recoveries for the most acidic phenols, with recoveries of only 20-50% for pentachlorophenol (PCP) depending on the species. It was concluded that this effect was governed by the dissociation of the phenols and adsorption to the protein tissue during the extraction (due to ionic interactions). To increase the sensitivity of the analysis, the phenols were converted to their pentafluorobenzoyl esters, by using a tetrabutylammonium-catalyzed extractive acylation. The reaction was quantitative within 2 min at room temperature, and the formed derivatives were persistent enough to withstand treatment with concentrated sulfuric acid.

  • 3. Petersson, Erik V.
    et al.
    Arif, Usman
    Schulzova, Vera
    Krtkova, Veronika
    Hajslova, Jana
    Meijer, Johan
    Andersson, Hans Christer
    Jonsson, Lisbeth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Ecology, Environment and Plant Sciences.
    Sitbon, Folke
    Glycoalkaloid and Calystegine Levels in Table Potato Cultivars Subjected to Wounding, Light, and Heat Treatments2013In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 61, no 24, p. 5893-5902Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Potato tubers naturally contain a number of defense substances, some of which are of major concern for food safety. Among these substances are the glycoalkaloids and calystegines. We have here analyzed levels of glycoalkaloids (alpha-chaconine and a-solanine) and calystegines (A(3), B-2, and B-4) in potato tubers subjected to mechanical wounding, light exposure, or elevated temperature: stress treatments that are known or anticipated to induce glycoalkaloid levels. Basal glycoalkaloid levels in tubers varied between potato cultivars. Wounding and light exposure, but not heat, increased tuber glycoalkaloid levels, and the relative response differed among the cultivars. Also, calystegine levels varied between cultivars, with calystegine B-4 showing the most marked variation. However, the total calystegine level was not affected by wounding or light exposure. The results demonstrate a strong variation among potato cultivars with regard to postharvest glycoalkaloid increases, and they suggest that the biosynthesis of glycoalkaloids and calystegines occurs independently of each other.

  • 4.
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Paulsson, Birgit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Vikström, Anna C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Chemistry.
    Granath, Fredrik
    Approach for cancer risk estimation of acrylamide in food on the basis of animal cancer tests and in vivo dosimetry2008In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 56, no 15, p. 6004-6012Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question about the contribution from acrylamide (AA) in food to the cancer risk in the general population has not yet had a satisfactory answer. One point of discussion is whether AA constitutes a cancer risk through its genotoxic metabolite, glycidamide (GA), or whether other mechanism(s) could be operating. Using a relative cancer risk model, an improvement of the cancer risk estimate for dietary AA can be obtained by estimation of the genotoxic contribution to the risk. One cornerstone in this model is the in vivo dose of the causative genotoxic agent. This paper presents an evaluation, according to this model, of published AA cancer tests on the basis of in vivo doses of GA in rats exposed in the cancer tests. The present status regarding data with importance for an improved estimation of the contribution from GA to the cancer risk of AA, such as in vivo doses measured in humans, is discussed.

  • 5. Zhou, Fang
    et al.
    Sultanbawa, Yasmina
    Feng, Huan
    Wang, Yong-Lei
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Meng, Qingtao
    Wang, Yue
    Zhang, Zhigiang
    Zhang, Run
    A New Red-Emitting Fluorescence Probe for Rapid and Effective Visualization of Bisulfite in Food Samples and Live Animals2019In: Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, ISSN 0021-8561, E-ISSN 1520-5118, Vol. 67, no 15, p. 4375-4383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of new methods for rapid and effective detection of bisulfite (HSO3-) in food samples and imaging of HSO3- intake in animals is of significant importance due to the key roles of HSO3- in food quality assurance and community health. In this work, a new responsive fluorescence probe, EQC, is reported for the quantitative detection of HSO3- in food samples and visualization of HSO3- intake in animals. Upon addition of HSO3-, the UV-vis absorption and red emission of EQC were significantly decreased within 120 s. The changes in absorption and emission spectra of EQC were rationalized by theoretical computations. The proposed reaction mechanism of EQC with HSO3- was confirmed by high-resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) and spectroscopic titration measurements. EQC has the advantages of high sensitivity, selectivity (a detection limit of 18.1 nM), and fast response toward HSO3-, which enable rapid and effective HSO3- detection in buffer solution. The practical applications of EQC were demonstrated by the detection of HSO3- in food samples and the imaging of HSO3- intake in live animals.

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