Ändra sökning
Avgränsa sökresultatet
1 - 5 av 5
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Träffar per sida
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sortering
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
  • Standard (Relevans)
  • Författare A-Ö
  • Författare Ö-A
  • Titel A-Ö
  • Titel Ö-A
  • Publikationstyp A-Ö
  • Publikationstyp Ö-A
  • Äldst först
  • Nyast först
  • Skapad (Äldst först)
  • Skapad (Nyast först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Äldst först)
  • Senast uppdaterad (Nyast först)
  • Disputationsdatum (tidigaste först)
  • Disputationsdatum (senaste först)
Markera
Maxantalet träffar du kan exportera från sökgränssnittet är 250. Vid större uttag använd dig av utsökningar.
  • 1.
    Ahlbeck Bergendahl, Ida
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Salvanes, Anne Gro V.
    Braithwaite, Victoria A.
    Determining the effects of duration and recency of exposure to environmental enrichment2016Ingår i: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 176, s. 163-169Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Experience can help animals adapt their behaviour to fit the environment or conditions that they find themselves in. Understanding how and when experience affects behaviour is important for the animals we rear in captivity. This is particularly true when we rear animals with the intent of releasing them into the wild as part of population rehabilitation and conservation efforts. We investigated how exposure to a changing, more complex environment promotes behavioural development in juvenile trout. Four groups of fish were compared; (i) fish that were maintained without enrichment, (ii) fish that were exposed to an early period of enrichment, but were then returned to a plain environment, (iii) fish that were maintained in plain conditions, but were then exposed to enrichment towards the end of the rearing phase, (iv) a group that were kept in enriched conditions throughout the 12 week rearing period. We then assessed fish anxiety levels, their spatial learning ability, and the capacity of the fish to find their way through a barrier where different routes were presented across 4 different trials. Fish that experienced enriched conditions for the longest duration had superior spatial learning abilities, and they were better at finding the correct route to get past the barrier than fish from the remaining three treatments. Positive effects on behaviour were, however, also found in the fish that only experienced enrichment in the last part of the rearing period, compared to the control, or fish exposed to early enrichment. No effect of enrichment was found on levels of anxiety in any of the groups.

  • 2.
    Granquist, Sandra M.
    et al.
    Institute of Freshwater Fisheries, Iceland.
    Thorhallsdottir, Anna Gudrun
    The Agricultural University of Iceland, Iceland; Bioforsk Ost, Norway.
    Sigurjonsdottir, Hrefna
    University of Iceland, Iceland.
    The effect of stallions on social interactions in domestic and semi feral harems2012Ingår i: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 141, nr 1-2, s. 49-56Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research indicates that stallions may supress interactions of their harem members, leading to less stable hierarchies and friendship bonds in harems compared to non-stallion groups. In this paper, the effect of the presense of a stallion on the social behaviour of mares was studied by comparing six harems containing stallions to four mixed sex groups not containing stallions. Both temporary and permanent harems were studied, giving the possibility to investigate the effect of group stability on social interactions. A significant linear hierarchy was found in all non-stallion groups that were used for comparison, while the hierarchies were only found to be linear in three of the six harems containing stallions (Landaus h´, p < 0.05). Aggression rate was lower (t-test, p < 0.05) and fewer friendship bonds (G-test, p < 0.0001) were found within the harems, compared to the groups without stallions. Stallions seldom intervene directly in interactions between harem members. Thus, our results give support to the hypothesis that stallions may suppress interactions of harem members, but in a more indirect way than with direct interference. In addition, our results give support for earlier findings that aggression rate may be affected by group stability. We found a higher aggression rate in the temporary harems compared to the permanent harems (Kruskal–Wallis, p < 0.05) and in the temporary non-stallion group compared to the permanent non-stallion group. The results have significance for further research on social structure of mammals, and may be applied in management of domestic animals.

  • 3.
    Granquist, Sandra Magdalena
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Institute of Freshwater Fisheries, Iceland; Icelandic Seal Center, Iceland.
    Sigurjonsdottir, Hrefna
    The effect of land based seal watching tourism on the haul-out behaviour of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) in Iceland2014Ingår i: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 156, s. 85-93Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of land-based seal watching on the haul-out pattern of harbour seals (Phoca vitulina) was investigated between June and August of 2008-2010 on Vatnsnes, NW Iceland. The results showed that the behaviour and spatial haul-out pattern of seals was affected by the tourists. In 2009 the seals were more likely to be vigilant during periods when tourists had access to the area, compared to a period when tourists were not allowed in the area. Also, in 2010 the likeliness of the seals being vigilant increased as the number of tourists in the area increased. In addition, seals were more likely to be vigilant when tourists behaved in an active way. During the post weaning period, which coincided with the peak of the tourist season, a significantly higher proportion of seals hauled out on the skerry located farthest away from land, compared to a skerry closer to land. Seals also preferred to haul out further away from land when the number of tourists in the area increased. Single tourists and couples behaved more passively compared to families and tourist groups of more than two adults. All tourist group types were significantly more active in an approaching zone than in the seal watching zone. Education of tourists, for example through a code of conduct built on these results, is advisable to minimise disturbance of seals in the area.

  • 4. Reimert, Inonge
    et al.
    Fong, Stephanie
    Wageningen University & Research, The Netherlands.
    Rodenburg, T. Bas
    Bolhuis, J. Elizabeth
    Emotional states and emotional contagion in pigs after exposure to a positive and negative treatment2017Ingår i: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 193, s. 37-42Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    After-effects of events that elicit an emotional state on both the animals that experienced these events and on their group members have only scarcely been studied. We investigated effects of a positive vs. negative treatment on the behaviour and emotional state of pigs and their naive pen mates afterwards. Behaviour of 96 pigs was observed in the home pen for 5 min on two different days (day 2 and 18), directly after two pigs per pen (N = 16) had been subjected to a positive or negative treatment in a test room. On day 2, treated pigs lay down more (30.78 +/- 4.07 vs. 15.25 +/- 3.74% of time, P = 0.01), walked less (17.91 +/- 2.82 vs. 26.87 +/- 2.32% of time, P = 0.02) and explored the pen less (12.30 +/- 1.34 vs. 18.29 +/- 1.71% of time, P = 0.01) after the negative compared to the positive treatment. Naive pigs simultaneously also lay more (45.67 +/- 6.00 vs. 18.79 +/- 5.88% of time, P = 0.003), walked less (6.33 +/- 0.80 vs. 12.83 +/- 1.74% of time, P < 0.001) and explored the pen less (6.80 +/- 1.23 vs. 13.47 +/- 2.34% of time, P = 0.02) after their pen mates' negative treatment. After their pen mates' positive treatment, in contrast, naive pigs showed more nosing behaviour, nose nose (0.83 +/- 0.14 vs. 0.40 +/- 0.06 freq./min, P = 0.004) and nose-body contact (0.73 +/- 0.10 vs. 0.47 +/- 0.06 freq./min, P = 0.02), and tended to play more (0.10 +/- 0.03 vs. 0.01 +/- 0.01 freq./min, P = 0.09). On day 18, treated pigs were only found to eat longer after the negative than the positive treatment (10.75 +/- 3.73 vs. 0.96 +/- 0.79% of time, P = 0.02), whereas their naive pen mates, similar to day 2, lay more (45.01 +/- 5.16 vs. 22.59 +/- 5.52% of time, P = 0.006), stood (40.73 +/- 3.84 vs. 57.32 +/- 4.29% of time, P = 0.007) and walked less (7.00 +/- 1.21 vs. 10.88 +/- 1.04% of time, P = 0.01). After their pen mates' positive treatment, at day 18, they still nosed the nose (0.52 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.21 +/- 0.04 freq./min, P < 0.001) and body of their pen mates more (0.68 +/- 0.06 vs. 0.29 +/- 0.05 freq./min, P = 0.002) than after their pen mates' negative treatment, and they tended to wag their tails more (2.30 +/- 0.95 vs. 0.68 +/- 0.41% of time, P = 0.08). Thus, pigs still appeared to be in a negative emotional state for some time after the negative treatment had ended. Furthermore, their pen mates also seemed to be (emotionally) affected even though they were not subjected to the treatment themselves. Negative and positive events may thus have consequences that extend beyond the duration of these events, for both the welfare of the exposed animals and their group members.

  • 5.
    Wergård, Eva-Marie
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Naturvetenskapliga fakulteten, Zoologiska institutionen. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Westlund, Karolina
    Spångberg, Mats
    Fredlund, Helene
    Forkman, Björn
    Training success in group-housed long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) is better explained by personality than by social rank2016Ingår i: Applied Animal Behaviour Science, ISSN 0168-1591, E-ISSN 1872-9045, Vol. 177, s. 52-58Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Using training to prepare laboratory animals for biomedical research is one important behavior management task. With increased knowledge about factors influencing training success, training programs may be optimized, resulting in a refinement of primate husbandry. Even when animals are trained under the same conditions there are individual differences in how they respond to training. The current paper focuses on two of the factors potentially influencing training success: social rank and personality. Five observers rated the personality and the social rank of 34 long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) in an observer trait rating survey. Training success was measured in 22 of these individuals and from four of their shaping protocols; hand-feeding, target training, presenting hands and presenting feet. From the factor analysis four personality traits could be identified: 'Emotionality', 'Activity', 'Sociability', and 'Tolerance'. A Multiple linear regressions with backward elimination showed that the personality trait 'Activity' was associated with training success (adj.R-2 = 0.71, p < 0.0005), and unexpectedly, social rank had less influence (adj.R-2 = 0.30, p = 0.005) on training success in group-housed long-tailed macaques. We propose that training success can be conceptualized as consisting of two components: access to the trainer and problem solving. In the case of personality, the two components combine to promote training success: curious animals gain access to trainers, and playful animals are good problem solvers; both these adjectives were present in the trait 'Activity'. In contrast, with regards to rank, qualities that increase access to the trainer (dominance) and traits that promote problem solving (subordinance) counteract one another, potentially explaining why in this study, training was better explained by personality than by rank. We discuss the importance of successfully training different types of personalities in order for the selection of animals in biomedical research to remain random and non-biased, rather than excluding those that do not respond well to training.

1 - 5 av 5
RefereraExporteraLänk till träfflistan
Permanent länk
Referera
Referensformat
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Annat format
Fler format
Språk
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Annat språk
Fler språk
Utmatningsformat
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf