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  • 1.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Gao, Man
    A regional survey of the relationship between vowel and consonant duration in Shetland Scots2015In: Folia linguistica, ISSN 0165-4004, E-ISSN 1614-7308, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 57-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The local dialect spoken in the Shetland Isles constitutes a form of Lowland Scots. It has been suggested that stressed syllables in Shetland Scots tend to contain either a long vowel followed by a short consonant (V:C) or a short vowel followed by a long consonant ( C:), and furthermore that this pattern constitutes a trace of complementary quantity in Norn, a Nordic language spoken in Shetland approximately until the end of the eighteenth century. The existence of such a pattern has also been supported by acoustic measurements. Following a summary and overview of Norn's demise in the Shetland Isles, this paper presents a regional survey of the relationship between vowel and consonant duration in stressed syllables in Shetland Scots. Based on acoustic data from 43 speakers, representing ten separate regions across the Shetland Isles, the inverse correlation between vowel and consonant duration is assessed. The results reveal that the inverse correlation is strongest in the northern part of Shetland and weakest in the south, and displays a general north-to-south decline across Shetland. The results are thus generally consistent with predictions that follow from regional variation concerning Norn's death; evidence suggests that it survived the longest in the northern parts of Shetland.

  • 2.
    Tissari, Heli
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Douglas Biber & Bethany Gray (2016) Grammatical Complexity in Academic English, 2016. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press2019In: Folia linguistica, ISSN 0165-4004, E-ISSN 1614-7308, Vol. 53, no 1, p. 293-296Article, book review (Other academic)
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