Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University, Sweden.
    Incorporation of children of immigrants: the case of descendants of immigrants from Turkey in Sweden2013In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 2141-2159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigatehh ow children of immigrants fromTurkey are integrated into Swedish society. The educational achievements and labour market outcomes of this group are compared with the performance  of the offspring of native.born parents. The aim of the study is to explore whether we can observe a tendency towards 'downwards mobility' among young people of immigrant background in Sweden and thereby provide reflections on the existing fomulationof the 'segmented assimilation' theory.Findings show that descendants of immigrants seem not to be in the process of downward assimilation, that is social exclusion and therefore formation of a distinct' underclassin Sweden. The concept of 'subordinate inclusion' is a more appropriate description of the experiences of children of immigrants.

  • 2.
    Behtoui, Alireza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology. Linköping University.
    The ethnic penalty: immigration, education and the labour market2013In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 36, no 5, p. 915-916Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bursell, Moa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Name change and destigmatization among Middle Eastern immigrants in Sweden2012In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 471-487Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research has shown that individuals in Sweden with foreign-sounding surnames who take on more Swedish-sounding or neutral surnames have a positive earnings progression compared to individuals who keep their foreign-sounding names. This article explores the strategies underlying these surname changes. I draw on forty-five interviews from a population of individuals with Middle Eastern backgrounds who changed surnames during the 1990s. Drawing on stigma and destigmatization theory, I argue that immigrant name change, a strategy typically associated with cultural assimilation, is a destigmatization strategy aiming for pragmatic assimilation. Through passing (as either Swedish or non-Middle Eastern), immigrants may keep the benefits of maintaining ethnic identity in their private life and the benefits of more easy public interactions outside the ethnic group. This study also illustrates how the institutional enabling of name change both creates and enables pragmatic assimilation.

  • 4.
    Ekman, Mattias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Online Islamophobia and the politics of fear: manufacturing the green scare2015In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 38, no 11, p. 1986-2002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Negative attitudes and explicit racism against Muslims are increasingly visible in public discourse throughout Europe. Right-wing populist parties have strengthened their positions by focusing on the ‘Islamic threat’ to the West. Concurrently, the Internet has facilitated a space where racist attitudes towards Muslims are easily disseminated into the public debate, fuelling animosity against European Muslims. This paper explores part of the online Islamophobic network and scrutinizes the discursive strategies deployed by three ‘prominent’ online actors. By combining social network analysis and critical discourse analysis, the study shows that Islamophobic web pages constitute a dynamic network with ties to different political and geographical milieus. They create a seemingly mainstream political position by framing racist standpoints as a defence of Western values and freedom of speech. The study also shows that Islamophobic discourse is strengthened by xenophobic currents within mass media, and by the legitimization of intellectuals and political actors.

  • 5.
    Lund, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Preparedness as a counter-memory. School desegregation, social chances and life chances2019In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 42, no 13, p. 2318-2325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How should we understand the conundrum of love for the segregated school – a system built to keep you in your place? In Gone Home. Race and Roots through Appalachia, Karida L. Brown looks at African American teacher’s work in segregated schools and shows how desegregation could be felt in both gains and losses in the black community. Those teachers prepared their students for a world of integration without freedom. This essay proposes a counter- memory of segregation, a relational agency of teachers past that remains to this day. Former students’ commemoration of teachers, principals, and schools dating from the time of institutionalized racial exclusion works as a symbolic reminder in a still-racist world, representing not only the need to be prepared, but also to stay prepared.

  • 6.
    Rydgren, Jens
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ruth, Patrick
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Contextual explanations of radical right-wing support in Sweden: socioeconomic marginalization, group threat, and the halo effect2013In: Ethnic and Racial Studies, ISSN 0141-9870, E-ISSN 1466-4356, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 711-728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper provides a thorough test of important contextual explanations of variation in electoral support for radical right-wing parties. It has been proposed that support of the radical right is particularly strong in areas that are socioeconomically poor and/or where the concentration of immigrants is high. A variant of the latter hypothesis, known as the halo effect', states that the propensity to vote for the radical right is highest in areas close to immigrant-dense areas, but not within these areas. The data analyses are based on the total population of voting districts in Sweden (N = 5,668), which makes it possible to avoid some of the problems that usually plague studies of contextual effects on voting, such as low numbers of observations. The results demonstrate support for the socioeconomic marginalization hypothesis and, when controlling for socioeconomic factors, the halo effect hypothesis; whereas the support for group threat theory is mixed.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf