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  • 1.
    Hammergren, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Att tala - att dansa: om metaforens betydelse inom danspedagogik2016In: Nordic Journal of Dance, ISSN 1891-6708, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 18-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article, based on interviews and observations of dance education, focuses on how dance pedagogues describe their methods of using verbal communication in the dance studio. The theoretical base embraces ideas about bodies as well as theories about the importance of metaphors in embodied communication. Moreover, it is argued that pedagogues and dance students are engaged in a corporeal version of critical thinking in which verbal language is one of several important aspects of the process.

    Four pedagogues were interviewed, and they represent different dance genres, which affects the type of verbal communication used. However, they shared the opinion that the use of metaphors has undergone a significant change. The frequent use of metaphors with reference to nature has been exchanged for more concrete, functional language. Both the dance techniques in use and the current aesthetic trends in choreography could well be affecting it.

  • 2.
    Hammergren, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Embodied Curriculum Theory and Research in Arts Education: A Dance Scholar's Search for Meaning. Author: Susan W. Stinson. Springer, 2016.2016In: Nordic Journal of Dance, ISSN 1891-6708, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 62-64Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3.
    Rothmund, Irene Velten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Dance Technique – Meanings and Applications2015In: Nordic Journal of Dance, ISSN 1891-6708, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 12-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores nuances in the meanings and applications of the term ‘dance technique’, by looking at how students in modern and contemporary dance articulate their understanding of the term, and by discussing this in relation to dance research articles on the theme. The article draws on a section of my on-going PhD project on the experiences in modern and contemporary dance of students at the Norwegian College of Dance. The project is informed by hermeneutic phenomenology (van Manen 1997), based on students’ logbooks and interviews. In one set of interviews, the students were asked to define the term ‘dance technique’. I have analysed the answers and discerned five approaches to the term: As a systemas knowledge or practical skills, as something set, as goal-oriented work and as ‘only technique’. The conjoining of students’ experiences with dance research articles shows both similarities and differences in comprehension of the term. I suggest that there is an ambiguity in the understanding of the term, touching upon different dichotomies existing in dance, and with parallels to a change between a modern dance tradition and a contemporary dance tradition. Clarifying taken-for-granted concepts can be of value for both dance education and dance research.

  • 4.
    Wulff, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Thriving dance spaces in the north: Nordic Dance Spaces: Practicing and Imagining a Region. Karen Vedel and Petri Hoppu, editors2014In: Nordic Journal of Dance, ISSN 1891-6708, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 50-51Article, book review (Other academic)
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