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  • 1.
    Carson, Marcus
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Acting locally to mitigate globally: climate action in the Anthropocene2015In: Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, ISSN 2190-6483, E-ISSN 2190-6491, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 58-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The idea that individual- or local-scale actions can combine to have global effects and relevance is of course not limited to the natural sciences. Slogans such as “think globally, act locally” have been used for many years in an effort to encourage individuals and locally anchored movements to see their place—and their actions—as part of a broader effort. What the message embedded in the term Anthropocene highlights, however, is the fact that a multitude of individuals acting locally influences global conditions whether or not we “think” globally. Nowhere is this more true than with climate change. In the Arctic, the consequences of climate change are more visible, yet the links between action and consequences appear more distant, and this illustrates a key challenge. Local action has often been pursued in the shadow of the global negotiations, yet many of the most important breakthroughs currently being made are arguably being accomplished at the local and regional levels. This is in fact the silver lining in that dark cloud surrounding the Anthropocene. It points to the critical importance of local level action on climate change, both from a governance perspective and for improving underlying the socio-technical conditions that influence what is possible in global efforts.

  • 2. Wallen, K. E.
    et al.
    Filbee-Dexter, K.
    Pittman, J. B.
    Posner, S. M.
    Alexander, Steven M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Waterloo, Canada.
    Romulo, C. L.
    Bennett, D. E.
    Clark, E. C.
    Cousins, S. J. M.
    Dubik, B. A.
    Garcia, M.
    Haig, H. A.
    Koebele, E. A.
    Qiu, J.
    Richards, R. C.
    Symons, C. C.
    Zipper, S. C.
    Integrating team science into interdisciplinary graduate education: an exploration of the SESYNC Graduate Pursuit2019In: Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences, ISSN 2190-6483, E-ISSN 2190-6491, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 218-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Complex socio-environmental challenges require interdisciplinary, team-based research capacity. Graduate students are fundamental to building such capacity, yet formal opportunities for graduate students to develop these capacities and skills are uncommon. This paper presents an assessment of the Graduate Pursuit (GP) program, a formal interdisciplinary team science graduate research and training program administered by the National Socio-Environmental Synthesis Center (SESYNC). Quantitative and qualitative assessment of the program’s first cohort revealed that participants became significantly more comfortable with interdisciplinary research and team science approaches, increased their capacity to work across disciplines, and were enabled to produce tangible research outcomes. Qualitative analysis of four themes—(1) discipline, specialization, and shared purpose, (2) interpersonal skills and personality, (3) communication and teamwork, and (4) perceived costs and benefits—encompass participants’ positive and negative experiences and support findings from past assessments. The findings also identify challenges and benefits related to individual personality traits and team personality orientation, the importance of perceiving a sense of autonomy and independence, and the benefit of graduate training programs independent of the university and graduate program environment.

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