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  • 1. Jakobsson, Niklas
    et al.
    Kotsadam, Andreas
    Szebehely, Marta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Informal eldercare and care fordisabled children in the Nordic countries: prevalence and relation to employment2013In: Nordic Journal of Social Research, ISSN 1892-2783, E-ISSN 1892-2783, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In an international comparison, the Nordic countries are generous care spenders and a relatively large proportion of the populations receive formal care services. However, in respect of service provision, the Nordic countries are less similar today than they were some decades ago. Using survey data from three Nordic countries, Denmark, Norway, and Sweden, we first document the differences in informal care between the countries, and then we assess its impact on the relationship between informal caregiving and formal employment. We find that informal care is most common in Denmark and least common in Sweden. However, those who provide care in Sweden provide care more often than people in both Norway and Denmark. There is a negative correlation between being a caregiver and the probability of being employed in Norway and Denmark, but not in Sweden. With specific regard to parental care, there is no general relation between the provision of parental care and employment, but those providing substantial care are clearly less likely to work than others. Caring for a disabled child is less common than caring for a parent, but the negative effects on employment are even stronger.

  • 2.
    Lundberg, Lisa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Stranz, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    A matter of choice—professionals’ views on the incorporation of practical work with intimate partner violence into Swedish personal social services2019In: Nordic Journal of Social Research, ISSN 1892-2783, E-ISSN 1892-2783, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 48-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades, efforts have been made to increase local support provided to victims of intimate partner violence (IPV) in Sweden. As with other social problems, responsibility to address IPV falls on the municipal personal social services. The present article draws upon data obtained via structured telephone interviews with designated personal social services staff members from a sample of 99 municipalities, focusing on aspects of potential progress in social work with IPV. The results show that successful incorporation of IPV into personal social services largely seems to depend upon the commitment and dedication of individual actors within the organisations. Furthermore, the data indicate that competence in this field depends on personal inclination, with attention to IPV appearing as ‘a matter of choice’. The results are analysed using neo-institutional theory as well as concepts related to social movement studies, with focus on individual agency in organisational change and the potential relevance of IPV as an issue related to gender inequality to gender inequality. The analysis suggests that while IPV social work may challenge institutionalised practises within social services, change may go both ways with IPV being reframed to fit within the established framework of social services.

  • 3.
    Maravelias, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, School of Business.
    Occupational Health Services and the Socialization of the post-Fordist Employee2012In: Nordic Journal of Social Research, ISSN 1892-2783, E-ISSN 1892-2783, Vol. 3, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a heightened interest in the health of employees among scholars, employers, legislators, and employees themselves. The concern for employees’ health is not a new phenomenon. It has held a central position in political and economic discourses throughout most of the twentieth century. The central argument of this article, however, is that the economic and political changes of the last three decades – the neo-liberal turn – have played a part in altering the very notion of health so that the healthy individual is now a person who not merely passes bio-medical tests, but a person who also leads a particular life and possesses particular skills, namely, those of the active, positive, and self-governing individual. By means of a qualitative study of the sector for occupational health services (OHSs) in Sweden, this article will show how an active lifestyle has become a defining criterion of health. Furthermore, it will describe how health thereby becomes a question of choice and responsibility and how the healthy employee comes across as morally superior to the unhealthy employee. In this connection, this article shows how health experts such as therapists, health coaches, physicians, and so on become important points of authority in the fashioning of the new healthy, active employee

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