Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Fransson, Eleonor I.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Nordin, Maria
    Magnusson Hanson, Linda L.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Westerlund, Hugo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Job strain and atrial fibrillation - Results from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health and meta-analysis of three studies2018In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 25, no 11, p. 1142-1149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Knowledge about the impact of occupational exposures, such as work stress, on the risk of atrial fibrillation is limited. The present study aims to investigate the association between job strain, a measure of work stress, and atrial fibrillation.

    Design Prospective cohort study design and fixed-effect meta-analysis.

    Methods Data from the Swedish Longitudinal Occupational Survey of Health (SLOSH) was utilised for the main analysis, combining self-reported data on work stress at baseline with follow-up data on atrial fibrillation from nationwide registers. Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were used to estimate hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). A fixed-effect meta-analysis was conducted to pool the results from the present study with results from two similar previously published studies.

    Results Based on SLOSH data, job strain was associated with an almost 50% increased risk of atrial fibrillation (hazard ratio 1.48, 95% CI 1.00-2.18) after adjustment for age, sex and education. Further adjustment for smoking, physical activity, body mass index and hypertension did not alter the estimated risk. The meta-analysis of the present and two previously published studies showed a consistent pattern, with job strain being associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation in all three studies. The estimated pooled hazard ratio was 1.37 (95% CI 1.13-1.67).

    Conclusion The results highlight that occupational exposures, such as work stress, may be important risk factors for incident atrial fibrillation.

  • 2.
    Goodman, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK.
    Kajantie, Eero
    Osmond, Clive
    Eriksson, Johan
    Koupil, Ilona
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Thornburg, Kent
    Phillips, David IW
    The relationship between umbilical cord length and chronic rheumatic heart disease: a prospective cohort study2015In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 1154-1160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: One previous, preliminary study reported that the length of the umbilical cord at birth is related to the risk of developing chronic rheumatic heart disease in later life. We sought to replicate this finding.

    DESIGN: Prospective, population-based birth cohort.

    METHODS: We traced 11,580 individuals born between 1915 and 1929 in Uppsala, Sweden. We identified cases with a main or secondary diagnosis of chronic rheumatic heart disease in the Swedish national inpatient, outpatient or death registers. Archived obstetric records provided data on umbilical cord length, gestational age, birthweight and placental weight.

    RESULTS: There were 136 patients with chronic rheumatic heart disease (72 men and 64 women) with a mean age at first hospital admission of 68 years (range 36-92). There was evidence of a positive association between umbilical cord length and risk of subsequent chronic rheumatic heart disease. The overall hazard ratio in the Swedish study (1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.27) was similar to that of the previous study, with some suggestion of larger effect in men than in women. No other birth characteristics were predictive except for weak evidence of a protective effect of higher birthweight in men.

    CONCLUSIONS: People with longer umbilical cords at birth are more likely to develop chronic rheumatic heart disease in later life. As longer umbilical cords have more spiral arteries and a higher vascular resistance, we hypothesize that the increased pressure load on the heart leads to changes in endothelial biology and increased vulnerability to the autoimmune process initiated by infection with β-haemolytic streptococci.

  • 3. Song, Aiqin
    et al.
    Liang, Yajun
    Yan, Zhongrui
    Sun, Binglun
    Cai, Chuanzhu
    Jiang, Hui
    Qiu, Chengxuan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Highly prevalent and poorly controlled cardiovascular risk factors among Chinese elderly people living in the rural community2014In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 21, no 10, p. 1267-1274Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The epidemiological scenario of cardiovascular risk factors (CRFs) among elderly people in rural China is unclear. We seek to describe the distribution, burden and management of major CRFs among older Chinese people living in the rural community. Methods This cross-sectional study included 1538 participants in the Confucius Hometown Aging Project (2010-2011) of people 60 years of age (mean age 68.6 years; 59.1% women) who lived in a rural community nearby Qufu, Shandong, China. Data were collected through a face-to-face interview, a clinical examination and laboratory tests. We carried out descriptive analysis on the prevalence and management of major CRFs. Results The overall prevalence of current smoking, physical inactivity, hypertension, diabetes, high cholesterol and obesity were 13.8%, 83.7%, 76.0%, 26.6%, 42.4% and 13.1%, respectively: 82.8% and 50.4% of participants had 2 and 3, respectively, of the six CRFs. Prevalence of alcohol consumption was 18.7%. Men were more likely to smoke and consume alcohol than women, whereas women were more likely to be obese and physically inactive than men (p<0.001). Prevalence of physical inactivity and hypertension increased with age, prevalence of alcohol intake and obesity decreased with age, and prevalence of smoking and diabetes was stable. Hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol were treated in 60.6%, 68.1% and 41.1% of those with the disease, respectively, but only 11.3%, 13.7% and 31.7% achieved good control. Conclusions CRFs are highly prevalent and poorly controlled among elderly people in rural China, where men and women have different CRF profiles. Intervention programs targeting major CRFs may improve the health of older people in China.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf