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  • 1.
    Ekman, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Widholm, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Twitter and the celebritisation of politics2014In: Celebrity Studies, ISSN 1939-2397, E-ISSN 1939-2400, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 518-520Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A distinctive feature of our time is the constant circulation of mediated images of celebrities, a process that has taken new directions after the rise of social media platforms such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. This article draws on the contention that contemporary politics is increasingly celebritised, both in terms of how politicians are folded into specific celebrity frames in the news media and in the way politicians ‘perform’ their own professional and private identities through frequent use of social media. Recently, Twitter has become an established platform for a more personal form of political communication, where politicians can influence and network with news media professionals as well as showcase images of their successful and glamorous lives.

    Drawing on examples from the prolific tweeter and Swedish minister for foreign affairs Carl Bildt we argue that the celebritisation of politics that takes place on Twitter can be conceptualised in terms of three modes of ‘performed connectivity’: public, media and celebrity connectivity respectively. As an analytical concept, performed connectivity accentuates that political communication on Twitter is increasingly performative, meaning that it exhibits the professional as well as private sides of politicians’ daily lives. The term also underlines that this performativity is intimately linked to ideas of connectivity, which create associations of status and ‘known-ness’ in the digital public space.

  • 2.
    Ganetz, Hillevi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    The Nobel celebrity-scientist: genius and personality2016In: Celebrity Studies, ISSN 1939-2397, E-ISSN 1939-2400, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 234-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scientists are a poorly covered area of research in the field of celebrity studies. This article attempts to rectify this issue by discussing representations of science and scientists in a televised Nobel Banquet on Swedish public-service television, SVT. The televised Nobel Banquet is a genre hybrid that consists of two genres; namely, science communication and award show. Drawing on cultural, media, and gender studies, this article examines the mediated persona of the scientist in the televised Nobel Banquet via contextualised textual analysis. The main questions of this article are as follows: in what ways do the media, the genre, and the idea of geniality affect the representation of the scientist? The article suggests that the increasing celebrification' of scientists is characteristic of the past several decades, and that, among other factors, this has been due to the entry of aspects of entertainment into banquet broadcasts. Through such processes, the celebrity-scientist' has emerged within the high-status sphere of science. However, a very specific type of celebrity is represented in the Nobel context: the celebrity-scientist is commonly a white man of high education whose fame has been reached through hard work in competition with others of the same kind. This representation of a scientist and its associated quality of genius will here be examined from a gender perspective.

  • 3.
    Hirdman, Anja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies, JMK.
    Flesh-images, body shame and affective ambiguities in celebrity gossip magazines2017In: Celebrity Studies, ISSN 1939-2397, E-ISSN 1939-2400, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 365-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decade celebrity gossip magazines targeted at a female audience have emerged in Sweden. With inquisitive attention paid to the detailed, fleshy exposure of female celebrities’ bodies and body parts, they portray what Weber refers to as body-based shame. This article argues that these flesh-images partake in an aesthetic feminine body discourse where the perfect and the imperfect are intrinsically linked with the ordinary and extraordinary paradox surrounding the celebrity persona. Flesh-images rely on their intertextuality. They indicate a loss of value, presenting female celebrities as ordinary by means of corporeal failure. While the exposure of body faults could point to the unattainable ideals of feminine bodily standards, they do so at the cost of reinforcing the implicit recognition of desire, shame and disgust familiar to female experience and looking relations. Hence, within a culture increasingly driven by a technology of extreme extroversion, flesh-images aimed at a female audience make sense through the logic of the revelation discourse that frames celebrity culture, and through the deeply ambivalent affects surrounding female embodiment.

  • 4.
    Widholm, Andreas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies. Södertörn University.
    Becker, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Celebrating with the celebrities: Television in public space during two royal weddings2015In: Celebrity Studies, ISSN 1939-2397, E-ISSN 1939-2400, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 6-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent emergence of an increasingly participatory media culture has opened up new ways for audiences to collectively negotiate the cultural meanings surrounding celebrities. Public screens are one such phenomenon, where people gather to witness the live broadcast of celebrity events. Taking our point of departure in two recent royal weddings in the UK and Sweden, we explore the performative displays that public viewing affords, as participants interact with the event on screen, with other participants, and with media representatives in the venue. This article provides a fresh analytical perspective on how audiences engage with royal celebrities in such mass-participatory consumption contexts, illuminating a little-studied area of celebrity culture.

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