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  • 1.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    McPhearson, Timon
    Kremer, Peleg
    Gomez-Baggethun, Erik
    Haase, Dagmar
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Wurster, Daniel
    Scale and context dependence of ecosystem service providing units2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 12, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ecosystem services (ES) have been broadly adopted as a conceptual framing for addressing human nature interactions and to illustrate the ways in which humans depend on ecosystems for sustained life and well-being. Additionally, ES are being increasingly included in urban planning and management as a way to create multi-functional landscapes able to meet the needs of expanding urban populations. However, while ES are generated and utilized within landscapes we still have limited understanding of the relationship between ES and spatial structure and dynamics. Here, we offer an expanded conceptualization of these relationships through the concept of service providing units (SPUs) as a way to plan and manage the structures and preconditions that are needed for, and in different ways influence, provisioning of ES. The SPU approach has two parts: the first deals with internal dimensions of the SPUs themselves, i.e, spatial and temporal scale and organizational level, and the second outlines how context and presence of external structures (e.g, built infrastructure or larger ecosystems) affect the performance of SPUs. In doing so, SPUs enable a more nuanced and comprehensive approach to managing and designing multi-functional landscapes and achieving multiple ES goals.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Tengö, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    McPhearson, Timon
    Kremer, Peleg
    Cultural ecosystem services as a gateway for improving urban sustainability2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 12, p. 165-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quality of life in cities depends, among other things, on ecosystem services (ES) generated locally within the cities by multifunctional blue and green infrastructure. Successfully protecting green infrastructure in locations also attractive for urban development requires deliberate processes of planning and policy formulation as well as broad public support. We propose that cultural ecosystem services (CES) may serve as a useful gateway for addressing and managing nature in cities. CES can help embed multifunctional ecosystems and the services they generate in urban landscapes and in the minds of urbanites and planners, and thus serve an important role in addressing urban sustainability. In the city, CES may be more directly experienced, their benefits more readily appreciated, and the environment-to-benefit linkages more easily and intuitively understood by the beneficiaries relative to many material ES. Thus, we suggest that a focus on CES supply can be a good starting point for increasing the awareness among urban residents also of the importance of ES. Furthermore, CES are often generated interdependently with other critical ES and engaging people in the stewardship of CES could provide increased awareness of the benefits of a larger group of urban non-cultural ES.

  • 3. Berbés-Blázquez, Marta
    et al.
    Bunch, Martin J.
    Mulvihill, Peter R.
    Peterson, Garry D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    van Wendel de Joode, Berna
    Understanding how access shapes the transformation of ecosystem services to human well-being with an example from Costa Rica2017In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 28, p. 320-327Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increasingly, ecosystem services have been applied to guide poverty alleviation and sustainable development in resource-dependent communities. Yet, questions of access, which are paramount in determining benefits from the production of ecosystem services, remain theoretically underdeveloped. That is, ecosystem assessments typically have paid little attention to identifying real or hypothetical beneficiaries and the mechanisms by which benefits may be realized. This limits their ability to guide policy and interventions at the local scale. Through a qualitative mixed methods approach, this article analyzes how access to different aspects of the production of provisioning services is negotiated in Bribri communities (Costa Rica) of small-scale plantain farmers with alternative modes of agricultural production. The analysis considers access to land, labour, knowledge, tools, markets, and credit. Our analysis reveals how institutions of access are organized differently in traditional vs. conventional systems of agriculture and how these shape power dynamics and pathways to well-being. We conclude that understanding institutions regulating access to ecosystem services provides more useful insights for poverty alleviation than approaches that assume homogeneous access to benefits.

  • 4. Canova, Moara Almeida
    et al.
    Lapola, David M.
    Pinho, Patrícia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Dick, Jan
    Patricio, Gleiciani B.
    Priess, Joerg A.
    Different ecosystem services, same (dis)satisfaction with compensation: A critical comparison between farmers' perception in Scotland and Brazil2019In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 35, p. 164-172Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Payments for Ecosystem Services (PES) schemes have increasingly expanded to consider ecosystem services (ESS). In Brazil, the Forest Code permits PES but does not specify the scheme operationalization. The way ESS should be quantified and valued has not yet been implemented country-wide, nor has the funding source for PES. Through interviews with farmers in Rio Claro-SP, Brazil, and in Cairngorms National Park in the highlands and lowlands of Scotland, UK, we compared farmers' perspectives concerning ESS and PES, focusing on the PES implementation in sugarcane landscape in Sao Paulo state. While Scottish farmers perceived more cultural services, Brazilian farmers focused on regulating services, which we attribute to socio-political and landscape differences. Despite these differences, farmers in both areas preferred opportunity cost approach for ESS valuation because this method captures efforts to maintain ESS. Thereby, the opportunity cost should be considered for valuation in PES schemes, but conversely, budgetary constraints make it impossible to satisfy farmers with PES in regions of high productivity in the southeast of Brazil. Lessons learned concerning the PES subsidies in Scotland indicates the importance of co-designing schemes with stakeholders, minimizing trade-offs between the environment. Therefore, the participants as ESS providers, beneficiaries and intermediaries in the public policies arena was recognized for co-optimize the trade-offs between costs and effectiveness in PES.

  • 5. de Souza, Danielle Maia
    et al.
    Russo Lopes, Gabriela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Hansson, Julia
    Hansen, Karin
    Ecosystem services in life cycle assessment: A synthesis of knowledge and recommendations for biofuels2018In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 30, p. 200-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is an increasing trend in promoting the use of biofuels for transportation as a low-fossil carbon energy source, but little knowledge on their multidimensional environmental impacts. Whole-system approaches, such as life cycle assessment (LCA), have been extensively employed to analyze the environmental performance of different biofuels. However, it remains unclear to which extent biofuels impact ecosystems and the services they provide, in particular related to different management practices. To overcome this challenge, this paper draws recommendations to better holistically address ecosystem services (ES) in LCA, with a focus on biofuels. We first pinpoint some of the challenges in accounting for the concept of ES in decision-making and review some of the existing ES classification frameworks and the usefulness of the cascade model. Second, we discuss the implications of identified context-specific aspects on the modeling of biofuel production impacts on ES in LCA. Finally, we propose a conceptual framework to link ES classification systems, the cascade model and the LCA approach. Although some challenges still remain unsolved, due to the existing life cycle impact assessment structure, existing ES frameworks and the cascade model are helpful tools to better include ES into LCA of different biofuels.

  • 6.
    Hahn, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    McDermott, Constance
    Ituarte-Lima, Claudia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Schultz, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Green, Tom
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Purposes and degrees of commodification: Economic instruments for biodiversity and ecosystem services need not rely on markets or monetary valuation2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 16, p. 74-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Commodification of nature refers to the expansion of market trade to previously non-marketed spheres. This is a contested issue both in the scientific literature and in policy deliberations. The aim of this paper is to analytically clarify and distinguish between different purposes and degrees of commodification and to focus attention to the safeguards: the detailed institutional design. We identify six degrees of commodification and find that all ecosystem services policies are associated with some degree of commodification but only the two highest degrees can properly be associated with neoliberalisation of nature. For example, most payments for ecosystem services (PES) are subsidy-like government compensations not based on monetary valuation of nature. Biodiversity offsets can be designed as market schemes or non-market regulations; the cost-effectiveness of markets cannot be assumed. To avoid the confusion around the concept 'market-based instrument' we suggest replacing it with 'economic instruments' since relying on the price signal is not the same thing as relying on the market. We provide a comprehensive framework emphasising the diversity in institutional design, valuation approaches and role of markets. This provides flexibility and options for policy integration of biodiversity and ecosystem services in different countries according to their political and cultural context.

  • 7.
    Harmáčková, Zuzana
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Global Change Research Institute of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic.
    Vačkář, David
    Future uncertainty in scenarios of ecosystem services provision: Linking differences among narratives and outcomes2018In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 33, p. 134-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Future provision of ecosystem services (ES) has been increasingly analysed through the scenario approach to address uncertainties and to communicate them to stakeholders and decision-makers. Multiple uncertainty-related aspects of the scenario approach have been discussed in the literature, e.g. how uncertainty is accounted for in ES modelling processes. However, this contribution aims to address another uncertainty-related aspect of scenario analysis, exploring the relationship between the diversity of qualitative scenario narratives on the one hand and the diversity of their respective quantitative outcomes on the other. We build on a local-scale case study and present a semi-quantitative approach to compare scenario narratives and outcomes, based on participatory scenario planning and ES modelling. Our results show that different scenario narratives may lead to similar levels of modelled ES provision, and vice versa, that similar narratives may result in contrasting scenario outcomes. We use these findings to derive uncertainty-related insights, and discuss how these can help formulate landscape management decisions, resulting in desirable ES outcomes across a range of plausible futures. Finally, we discuss the need to apply both spatial and aspatial approaches to compare the convergence of scenario outcomes, and the implications for potential interpretation of the results by stakeholders and decision-makers.

  • 8.
    Häyhä, Tiina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Parthenope University of Naples, Italy.
    Franzese, Pier Paolo
    Paletto, Alessandro
    Fath, Brian D.
    Assessing, valuing, and mapping ecosystem services in Alpine forests2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 14, p. 12-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Forests support human economy and well-being with multiple ecosystem services. In this paper, the ecosystem services generated in a mountainous forest area in North Italy were assessed in biophysical and monetary units. GIS was used to analyze and visualize the distribution and provision of different services. The assessment of ecosystem services in biophysical units was an important step to investigate ecosystem functions and actual service Bows supporting socio-ecological systems. The Total Economic Value (TEV) of all the investigated ecosystem services was about 33 M(sic)/yr, corresponding to 820 (sic)/ha/yr. The provisioning services represented 40% of the TEV while the regulating and cultural services were 49% and 11%. The service of hydrogeological protection, particularly important in areas characterized by a high risk of avalanches and landslides, showed a major importance among the regulating services (81%) and within the TEV (40%). Results from mapping ecosystem services were useful in identifying and visualizing priority areas for different services, as well as exploring trade-offs and synergies between services. Finally, we argue that while a biophysical perspective can ensure a solid accounting base, a comprehensive economic valuation of all categories of forest ecosystem services can facilitate communication of their importance to policy makers.

  • 9. Krasny, Marianne E.
    et al.
    Russ, Alex
    Tidball, Keith G.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Systems Ecology.
    Civic ecology practices: Participatory approaches to generating and measuring ecosystem services in cities2014In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 7, p. 177-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Civic ecology practices are community based, environmental stewardship actions taken to enhance green infrastructure, ecosystem services, and human well-being in cities and other human-dominated landscapes. Examples include tree planting in post-Katrina New Orleans, oyster restoration in New York City, community gardening in Detroit, friends of parks groups in Seattle, and natural area restoration in Cape Flats, South Africa. Whereas civic ecology practices are growing in number and represent a participatory approach to management and knowledge production as called for by global sustainability initiatives, only rarely are their contributions to ecosystem services measured. In this paper, we draw On literature sources and our prior research in urban social-ecological systems to explore protocols for monitoring biodiversity, functional measures of ecosystem services, and ecosystem services valuation that can be adapted for use by practitioner-scientist partnerships in civic ecology settings. Engaging civic ecology stewards in collecting such measurements presents opportunities to gather data that can be used as feedback in an adaptive co-management process. Further, we suggest that civic ecology practices not only create green infrastructure that produces ecosystem services, but also constitute social-ecological processes that directly generate ecosystem services (e.g., recreation, education) and associated benefits to human well-being.

  • 10.
    Langemeyer, Johannes
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain.
    Baro, Francesc
    Roebeling, Peter
    Gomez-Baggethun, Erik
    Contrasting values of cultural ecosystem services in urban areas: The case of park Montjuic in Barcelona2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 12, p. 178-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Urban green infrastructure attracts growing attention for its potential as a nature-based strategy to improve quality of life through the provision of ecosystem services. In this paper, we value cultural ecosystem services in relation to land-uses and management regimes of urban green infrastructure. Through a survey among 198 beneficiaries of the largest urban park in Barcelona, Spain, we assessed cultural ecosystem services in monetary and non-monetary terms in relation to land-uses and management regimes. Results from our research suggest that monetary and non-monetary valuations capture complementary information, and show that values of cultural ecosystem services change across different green infrastructure assets and management regimes. For example, 'environmental learning' generates low monetary values but high non-monetary values. Stronger place values were related with low management intensity, while values for tourism increase with land-uses embedding cultural facilities. We discuss monetary and non-monetary values in the light of urban green infrastructure strategies and indicate potentials for urban planning and management to proactively alter the provision of cultural ecosystem services through specific configurations of land-uses and management intensity.

  • 11.
    Malinga, Rebecka
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gordon, Line J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Jewitt, Graham
    Lindborg, Regina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Mapping ecosystem services across scales and continents - A review2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 13, p. 57-63Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tremendous progress in ecosystem service mapping across the world has moved the concept of ecosystem services forward towards an increasingly useful tool for policy and decision making. There is a pressing need to analyse the various spatial approaches used for the mapping studies. We reviewed ecosystem services mapping literature in respect to spatial scale, world distribution, and types of ecosystem services considered. We found that most world regions were represented among ecosystem service mapping studies and that they included a diverse set of ecosystem services, relatively well distributed across different ecosystem service categories. A majority of the studies were presented at intermediary scales (municipal and provincial level), and 66% of the studies used a fine resolution of 1 ha or less. The intermediary scale of presentation is important for land use policy and management. The fact that studies are conducted at a fine resolution is important for informing land management practices that mostly takes place at the scale of fields to villages. Ecosystem service mapping could be substantially advanced by more systematic development of cross-case comparisons and methods.

  • 12. McPhearson, Timon
    et al.
    Andersson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Elmqvist, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Frantzeskaki, Niki
    Resilience of and through urban ecosystem services2015In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 12, p. 152-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cities and urban areas are critical components of global sustainability as loci of sustainability progress and drivers of global transformation, especially in terms of energy efficiency, climate change adaptation, and social innovation. However, urban ecosystems have not been incorporated adequately into urban governance and planning for resilience despite mounting evidence that urban resident health and wellbeing is closely tied to the quality, quantity, and diversity of urban ecosystem services. We suggest that urban ecosystem services provide key links for bridging planning, management and governance practices seeking transitions to more sustainable cities, and serve an important role in building resilience in urban systems. Emerging city goals for resilience should explicitly incorporate the value of urban ES in city planning and governance. We argue that cities need to prioritize safeguarding of a resilient supply of ecosystem services to ensure livable, sustainable cities, especially given the dynamic nature of urban systems continually responding to global environmental change. Building urban resilience of and through ecosystem services, both in research and in practice, will require dealing with the dynamic nature of urban social-ecological systems and incorporating multiple ways of knowing into governance approaches to resilience including from scientists, practitioners, designers and planners.

  • 13. Nguyen, Thi
    et al.
    Berg, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography.
    Gallardo, Wenresti
    Chau, Thi
    Stakeholders' perceptions of ecosystem services and Pangasius catfish farming development along the Hau River in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam2017In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 25, p. 2-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study identifies stakeholders' perceptions of ecosystem services (ESS) along the Mekong River in Vietnam. It evaluates trade-offs made between ESS under different Pangasius catfish development scenarios, and stakeholders' preferences to these scenarios. The study was conducted through interviews, focus group discussions and a questionnaire survey with 150 households. Rice cultivation and Pangasius catfish farming were identified as the most important economic activities. Provisioning services were scored as the most important ESS, followed by supporting, regulating and cultural services. Most stakeholders perceived that an intensification of Pangasius catfish farming would increase the production of catfish, but decrease nine other ESS, while integrated Pangasius catfish farming would decrease the Pangasius catfish production but increase nine other ESS. An integrated system was preferred by the majority of the respondents, mainly because it was perceived to enhance several ESS and provide benefits to local communities. In conclusion, a sustainable development of Pangasius catfish farming in the Mekong Delta must include local stakeholders' participation and apply farming strategies that make use of the natural environment without severely or irreversibly degrading it.

  • 14.
    Sinare, Hanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Gordon, Line J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Enfors Kautsky, Elin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Assessment of ecosystem services and benefits in village landscapes – A case study from Burkina Faso2016In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 21, p. 141-152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Most methods to assess ecosystem services have been developed on large scales and depend on secondary data. Such data is scarce in rural areas with widespread poverty. Nevertheless, the population in these areas strongly depends on local ecosystem services for their livelihoods. These regions are in focus for substantial landscape investments that aim to alleviate poverty, but current methods fail to capture the vast range of ecosystem services supporting livelihoods, and can therefore not properly assess potential trade-offs and synergies among services that might arise from the interventions. We present a new method for classifying village landscapes into social-ecological patches (landscape units corresponding to local landscape perceptions), and for assessing provisioning ecosystem services and benefits to livelihoods from these patches. We apply the method, which include a range of participatory activities and satellite image analysis, in six villages across two regions in Burkina Faso. The results show significant and diverse contributions to livelihoods from six out of seven social-ecological patches. The results also show how provisioning ecosystem services, primarily used for subsistence, become more important sources of income during years when crops fail. The method is useful in many data poor regions, and the patch-approach allows for extrapolation across larger spatial scales with similar social-ecological systems.

  • 15. Soy-Massoni, Emma
    et al.
    Langemeyer, Johannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB), Spain.
    Varga, Diego
    Saez, Marc
    Pinto, Josep
    The importance of ecosystem services in coastal agricultural landscapes: Case study from the Costa Brava, Catalonia2016In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 17, p. 43-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Agricultural landscapes are increasingly valued by society for their potential to provide multiple benefits and values, such as landscape beauty or habitat for biodiversity. Yet, Mediterranean agricultural landscapes are still following a pattern of changes under the narrow focus of increased agricultural productivity, while other benefits and values are depleted. In this study, we assess the importance and multiple benefits Mediterranean agricultural landscapes provide using the ecosystem services approach. Our research aims at assessing different social perceptions concerning the importance of coastal agrarian landscapes for human wellbeing. Using a case study from a coastal agricultural landscape at the Costa Brava, Girona (Spain), we combined non-monetary and monetary methods to assess social perception and the willingness to pay for ecosystem services' delivery. Our study involved different social groups including local residents and tourists visiting the area. Results show that provisioning services and nonproductive ecosystem services, such as supporting and cultural services are seen as almost equally important and trade-offs emerge between their prioritizations. A strong preference for cultural ecosystem services, especially aesthetic value (non-monetary valuation) and environmental education (monetary valuation), can be observed. Our results suggest that different preferences are influenced by the respondents' place of residency and place of visit.

  • 16. Willcock, Simon
    et al.
    Hooftman, Danny
    Sitas, Nadia
    O'Farrell, Patrick
    Hudson, Malcolm D.
    Reyers, Belinda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Eigenbrod, Felix
    Bullock, James M.
    Do ecosystem service maps and models meet stakeholders' needs? A preliminary survey across sub-Saharan Africa2016In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 18, p. 110-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To achieve sustainability goals, it is important to incorporate ecosystem service (ES) information into decision-making processes. However, little is known about the correspondence between the needs of ES information users and the data provided by the researcher community. We surveyed stakeholders within sub-Saharan Africa, determining their ES data requirements using a targeted sampling strategy. Of those respondents utilising ES information (> 90%; n = 60), 27% report having sufficient data; with the remainder requiring additional data - particularly at higher spatial resolutions and at multiple points in time. The majority of respondents focus on provisioning and regulating services, particularly food and fresh water supply (both 58%) and climate regulation (49%). Their focus is generally at national scales or below and in accordance with data availability. Among the stakeholders surveyed, we performed a follow-up assessment for a sub-sample of 17 technical experts. The technical experts are unanimous that ES models must be able to incorporate scenarios, and most agree that ES models should be at least 90% accurate. However, relatively coarse-resolution (1-10 km(2)) models are sufficient for many services. To maximise the impact of future research, dynamic, multi-scale datasets on ES must be delivered alongside capacity-building efforts.

  • 17. Wood, Sylvia L. R.
    et al.
    Jones, Sarah K.
    Johnson, Justin A.
    Brauman, Kate A.
    Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca
    Fremier, Alexander
    Girvetz, Evan
    Gordon, Line J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre.
    Kappel, Carrie V.
    Mandle, Lisa
    Mulligan, Mark
    O'Farrell, Patrick
    Smith, William K.
    Willemen, Louise
    Zhang, Wei
    DeClerck, Fabrice A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. CGIAR, France.
    Distilling the role of ecosystem services in the Sustainable Development Goals2018In: Ecosystem Services, ISSN 2212-0416, E-ISSN 2212-0416, Vol. 29, p. 70-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Achieving well-being for all, while protecting the environment, is one of the most pressing global challenges of our time, and a central idea in the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). We believe that integrating ecosystem services, the benefits nature provides to people, into strategies for meeting the SDGs can help achieve this. Many development goals are likely underpinned by the delivery of one or more ecosystem services. Understanding how these services could support multiple development targets will be essential for planning synergistic and cost-effective interventions. Here we present the results of an expert survey on the contributions of 16 ecosystem services to achieving SDG targets linked to environment and human well-being, and review the capacity of modelling tools to evaluate SDG-relevant ecosystem services interactions. Survey respondents judged that individual ecosystem services could make important contributions to achieving 41 targets across 12 SDGs. The provision of food and water, habitat & biodiversity maintenance, and carbon storage & sequestration were perceived to each make contributions to > 14 SDG targets, suggesting cross-target interactions are likely, and may present opportunities for synergistic outcomes across multiple SDGs. Existing modelling tools are well-aligned to support SDG-relevant ecosystem service planning. Together, this work identifies entry points and tools to further analyze the role of ecosystem services to support the SDGs.

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