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  • 1.
    Berndt, Susanne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Cutting the Gordion knot: The iconography of Megaron 2 at Gordion2015In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 8, 85-108 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the incised drawings of Early Phrygian Gordion, and in particular those of Megaton 2. Aspects of their iconographic and archaeological contexts are taken in to consideration, as well as literary sources and especially the story of the Gordian knot. The focus of the study is a series of incised labyrinths, which have hitherto not been recognized as such, but which are of particular interest for the analysis of this building. The myth of Theseus and the Minotaur in the labyrinth helps to throw light on both the images of Megaton 2 but also on the story of the Gordion knot, and how these are interlinked with each other. It is suggested that Ariadne's ball of thread and the Gordian knot are two different expressions of a similar concept; both represent sovereignty provided by a Goddess. Megaron 2 seems to have been a building that was intimately connected with both the king and the Phrygian Mother Goddess.

  • 2.
    Blid, Jesper
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    el-Antony, Abouna Maximous
    Lundhaug, Hugo
    Zaborowsky, Jason
    Polliack, Meira
    Gobezie Worku, Mengistu
    Rubenson, Samuel
    Excavations at the Monastery of St Antony at the Red Sea2016In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 9, 133-215 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the results from recent archaeological investigations at the Monastery of St Antony in Egypt, including the remains of a number of building phases predating the current church, locally produced pottery, and manuscript fragments written in Coptic, Arabic, Hebrew, and Ge'ez.

  • 3.
    Blid Kullberg, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Building a New Rome: The Imperial Colony of Pisidian Antioch (25 BC–AD 700)2013In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, no 6, 339-340 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Dancing with decorum: The eclectic usage of kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers in Roman visual culture2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 5, 7-47 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines two groups of motifs in Roman visual culture: females modelled on kalathiskos dancers, and males modelled on pyrrhic dancers. Eclecticism is emphasized as a strategy which was used to introduce novelties that were appropriate within a Roman cultural context. The figures representing kalathiskos dancers and pyrrhic dancers were both changed in an eclectic manner and this resulted in motifs representing the goddess Victoria, and the curetes respectively.

    Kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae figure on many different media at least from the Augustan era and into the 2nd century AD. It is argued here that the establishment of these two motifs in Roman visual culture is closely related to the aesthetics which came to the fore during the reign of Augustus. Thereafter, both kalathiskos dancers and eclectic Victoriae lingered on in the Roman cultural context until many of the material categories on which they were depicted ceased to be produced.

    Unlike the kalathiskos dancers, the male figures modelled on pyrrhic dancers are so rare within Roman visual culture that we can only assume they were, to some extent, perceived as an inappropriate motif. This can most likely be explained by the negative attitude, amongst the Roman elite, towards male dancing.

  • 5.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Kunst von unten? Stil und Gesellschaft in der antiken Welt von der "arte plebea" bis heute (Palilia, 27), eds. Francesco de Angelis, Jens-Arne Dickmann, Felix Pirson and Ralf von den Hoff, Deutsches Archäologisches Institut Rom. Wiesbaden 2012. 184 pp. ISBN 978-3-89500-915-02014In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 7, 246-248 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Marsyas in the garden?: Small-scale sculptures referring to the Marsyas in the forum2010In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 3, 163-178 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While studying a small-scale sculpture in the collections of the Nationalmuseum in Stockholm, I noticed that it belongs to a previously unrecognized sculpture type. The type depicts a paunchy, bearded satyr who stands with one arm raised. To my knowledge, four replicas exist. By means of stylistic comparison, they can be dated to the late second to early third centuries AD. Due to their scale and rendering they are likely to have been freestanding decorative elements in Roman villas or gardens.

    The iconography of the satyrs of the type discussed is closely related to that of a group of fountain figures. These fountain figures are believed to refer to a motif well known in Roman times: the Marsyas in the forum. In this article I argue that the satyrs of the type discussed refer as well to this once famous depiction of Marsyas.

  • 7.
    Habetzeder, Julia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    The impact of restoration: The example of the dancing satyr in the Uffizi2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 5, 133-163 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to show that reputed restorations may have an unexpected impact on the study of ancient sculpture. During the 17th-19th centuries a number of restored antiques where held in exceptionally high regard. One of the consequences of their renowned was the production of copies and adaptations in different scales and media. Such reproductions did not distinguish between the ancient and the restored parts of the work.

    Today these reproductions are centuries old, and in many cases their provenance has long since been forgotten. Therefore, such post-antique sculptures are easily misinterpreted as ancient. Subsequently, they are at times used as evidence of ancient sculptural production. Needless to say, this may cause flawed notions of Classical sculpture.

    The complexity of this relationship, between the ancient and the restored, is here exemplified by tracing the impact that a restored motif – “satyrs with cymbals” – has had on the study of an ancient sculpture type – the satyr attributed to “The invitation to the dance”.

  • 8. Karlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Blid, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Henry, Olivier
    Labraunda 2011: A preliminary report on the Swedish excavations with an appendix by Ragnar Hedlund2012In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, no 5, 49-87 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main goals of the 2011 campaign were the excavation of the Kepez tower, the West Church and the necropoleis. The tower of Kepez was excavated and black-gloss pottery indicates a date in the 3rd century BC. The 2011 excavations in the West Church uncovered three Late Roman and Byzantine building phases. Among the finds from Late Antiquity was a well-preserved glass lamp with a Greek inscription and a marble figurine, possibly representing an apostle or a saint. The excavations in the necropolis uncovered eleven tombs in the Area 5B, located along the Sacred Way, completing the excavation initiated in 2010. New tombs were discovered in the territory east and south of the sanctuary. Finally, the three stone sarcophagi inside the Built Tomb were moved in order to facilitate complete excavation and the cleaning of all the interior space of this monumental tomb. The conservation of architectural marble was continued and included the conservation of an Ionic column capital and an anta capital from Andron B. Thomas Thieme and Pontus Hellström prepared the publication of the andrones.

  • 9. Karlsson, Lars
    et al.
    Blid Kullberg, Jesper
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies, Classical Archaeology and Ancient History.
    Vergnaud, Baptiste
    Freccero, Agneta
    Labraunda 2012–2013: A preliminary report on the work at the sanctuary, with a new reconstruction drawing of the sanctuary by Jesper Blid Kullberg and an appendix by Fredrik Tobin2014In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, no 7, 23-59 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Scheffer, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Cooking stands and braziers in Greek sanctuaries2014In: Opuscula: Annual of the Swedish Institutes at Athens and Rome, ISSN 2000-0898, Vol. 7, 175-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of dining-rooms in Greek sanctuaries shows that food was eaten and most likely also cooked on the premises. The study of both the preparation and the cooking of the food eaten in the sanctuaries would be too much, and this paper will therefore concentrate on the presence of cooking stands and braziers in Greek sanctuaries, their uses, and on other related means of carrying the pots. Cooking stands were meant to hold the cooking pots above the fire; they were open at the bottom and were placed in the fire or perhaps rather in the glowing embers of a fire. In Etruria, there were three types (types I-III): a cylindrical stand with a top plate with holes, a half-cylindrical stand with three supports attached to the inner side of the wall, and a barrel-like stand with a narrower top. Cooking braziers had, unlike the cooking stands, a closed bottom as well as the means to carry a pot.

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