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  • 1.
    Angerbrandt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Political decentralisation and conflict: The Sharia crisis in Kaduna, Nigeria2011In: Journal for Contemporary African Studies, ISSN 0258-9001, E-ISSN 1469-9397, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 15-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When states in northern Nigeria started processes for implementing Sharia laws in 1999, it triggered sentiments all over the country. In Kaduna State, the proposal led to demonstrations and violent clashes. The article examines the ways in which different scales of politics are mutually constituted in the Sharia case and how the Sharia proposal subsequently resulted in clashes in Kaduna. It is argued that the Sharia initiative, even though it started as a sub-national question, was connected to a national power contestation. However, the federal government remained passive and diverted the issue to local political space. In Kaduna, the issue took dimensions that incurred with apprehensive local political contention that made it escalate into violence and polarising people according to religion. An analysis of the crisis in Kaduna is offered that does not regard the conflict as locally confined, but as inherently related to wider political and historical processes.

  • 2.
    Angerbrandt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Religion, ethnicity and citizenship: demands for territorial self-determination in southern Kaduna, Nigeria2015In: Journal for Contemporary African Studies, ISSN 0258-9001, E-ISSN 1469-9397, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 232-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the ‘politics of scale’ of how identity is linked to territory in the quest for self-determination by actors on the Christian side of the ethno-religious conflict in Kaduna State, Nigeria. Ethnic and political relations are framed with reference to scale, such as ‘the local’ and ‘the regional’, in ways that support claims for territorial control on an ethnic and religious basis. The experience of lack of access to the state is seen to be grounded in community identities. Furthermore, the state relates to citizens through religious and neo-customary authorities as a way to localise authority. This is connected to an idea that neo-customary institutions represent ‘the local’. It is argued in this article that these institutions are just as entangled in various constructions of scale as the state.

  • 3.
    Jennische, Ulrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology, Stockholm Centre for Organizational Research (SCORE).
    Navigating conflicting moral temporalities: gradual growth, state sovereignty and small-scale trade in urban Ghana2024In: Journal for Contemporary African Studies, ISSN 0258-9001, E-ISSN 1469-9397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article delves into the moral economy that informs small-scale trade in urban Ghana's growing markets, and that intersects with development, the state, and the global economy. Small-small, emphasizes slow, gradual, dependable progress and inclusiveness. While (re)distributing profit and possibilities, small-small is also used to discredit competitors and is felt to inhibit personal growth. It furthermore often conflicts with neoliberal norms of self-governing and self-optimization. Drawing from fieldwork in Tamale, the study explores how morality intertwines with market dynamics, the nation-state, and politics of informality. Moral economy illuminates the temporal tensions between individual and collective gains against the backdrop of local economic practices and global capitalism. It underscores the moral underpinnings of protectionism and sovereignty amid neoliberal shifts, revealing complex interactions shaping economic life in urban Ghana.

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