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  • 1.
    Abergel, David S. L.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Edge, Jonathan M.
    Balatsky, Alexander V.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA.
    The role of spin-orbit coupling in topologically protected interface states in Dirac materials2014In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 16, p. 065012-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We highlight the fact that two-dimensional (2D) materials with Dirac-like low energy band structures and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) will produce linearly dispersing topologically protected Jackiw-Rebbi modes at interfaces where the Dirac mass changes sign. These modes may support persistent spin or valley currents parallel to the interface, and the exact arrangement of such topologically protected currents depends crucially on the details of the SOC in the material. As examples, we discuss buckled 2D hexagonal lattices such as silicene or germanene, and transition metal dichalcogenides such as MoS2.

  • 2.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Khandanyan, Hovhannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pani, Priscilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Plucinski, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC). Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    A search for an excited muon decaying to a muon and two jets in pp collisions at root s=8 TeV with the ATLAS detector2016In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 18, article id 073021Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anew search signature for excited leptons is explored. Excited muons are sought in the channel pp -> mu mu* -> mu mu jet jet, assuming both the production and decay occur via a contact interaction. The analysis is based on 20.3 fb(-1) of pp collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of root s = 8 TeV taken with the ATLAS detector at the large hadron collider. No evidence of excited muons is found, and limits are set at the 95% confidence level on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the excited-muon mass m(mu)*. For m(mu)* between 1.3 and 3.0 TeV, the upper limit on sigma B(mu* -> mu q (q) over bar) is between 0.6 and 1 fb. Limits on sB are converted to lower bounds on the compositeness scale Lambda. In the limiting case Lambda = m(mu)*, excited muons with a mass below 2.8 TeV are excluded. With the same model assumptions, these limits at larger mu* masses improve upon previous limits from traditional searches based on the gauge-mediated decay mu* -> mu gamma.

  • 3.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åkerstedt, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bertoli, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Cribbs, Wayne A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pani, Priscilla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Pöttgen, Ruth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shaikh, Nabila W.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Shcherbakova, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ughetto, Michaël
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Valdes Santurio, Eduardo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Wallängen, Veronica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Search for scalar leptoquarks in pp collisions at root s=13TeV with the ATLAS experiment2016In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 18, article id 093016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inclusive search for a new-physics signature of lepton-jet resonances has been performed by the ATLAS experiment. Scalar leptoquarks, pair-produced in pp collisions at root s = 13 TeV at the large hadron collider, have been considered. An integrated luminosity of 3.2 fb(-1), corresponding to the full 2015 dataset was used. First (second) generation leptoquarks were sought in events with two electrons (muons) and two or more jets. The observed event yield in each channel is consistent with Standard Model background expectations. The observed (expected) lower limits on the leptoquark mass at 95% confidence level are 1100 and 1050 GeV (1160 and 1040 GeV) for first and second generation leptoquarks, respectively, assuming a branching ratio into a charged lepton and a quark of 100%. Upper limits on the aforementioned branching ratio are also given as a function of leptoquark mass. Compared with the results of earlier ATLAS searches, the sensitivity is increased for leptoquark masses above 860 GeV, and the observed exclusion limits confirm and extend the published results.

  • 4.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Johansson, K. Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Khandanyan, Hovhannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kim, Hyeon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ohm, Christian C.
    CERN.
    Papadelis, Aras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Petridis, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Plucinski, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Search for excited electrons and muons in root s=8 TeV proton-proton collisions with the ATLAS detector2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15, p. 093011-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider is used to search for excited electrons and excited muons in the channel pp -> ll* -> ll gamma, assuming that excited leptons are produced via contact interactions. The analysis is based on 13 fb(-1) of pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV. No evidence for excited leptons is found, and a limit is set at the 95% credibility level on the cross section times branching ratio as a function of the excited-lepton mass m(l*). For m(l*) >= 0.8 TeV, the respective upper limits on sigma B(l(*) -> l gamma) are 0.75 and 0.90 fb for the e* and mu* searches. Limits on sigma B are converted into lower bounds on the compositeness scale 3. In the special case where Lambda = m(l*), excited-electron and excited-muon masses below 2.2 TeV are excluded.

  • 5.
    Abulaiti, Yiming
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Åsman, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bessidskaia, Olga
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Johansson, K. Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Khandanyan, Hovhannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kim, Hyeon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Molander, Simon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ohm, Christian C.
    CERN, Geneva, Switzerland.
    Petridis, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Plucinski, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Rossetti, Valerio
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Measurement of the cross-section of high transverse momentum vector bosons reconstructed as single jets and studies of jet substructure in pp collisions at root s=7TeV with the ATLAS detector2014In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 16, p. 113013-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a measurement of the cross-section for high transverse momentum W and Z bosons produced in pp collisions and decaying to allhadronic final states. The data used in the analysis were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of root s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb(-1). The measurement is performed by reconstructing the boosted W or Z bosons in single jets. The reconstructed jet mass is used to identify the W and Z bosons, and a jet substructure method based on energy cluster information in the jet centre-ofmass frame is used to suppress the large multi-jet background. The cross-section for events with a hadronically decaying W or Z boson, with transverse momentum p(T) > 320 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta| < 1.9, is measured to be sigma W+ Z= 8.5 +/- 1.7 pb and is compared to next-to-leading-order calculations. The selected events are further used to study jet grooming techniques.This paper presents a measurement of the cross-section for high transverse momentum W and Z bosons produced in pp collisions and decaying to allhadronic final states. The data used in the analysis were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider at a centre-of-mass energy of root s = 7 TeV and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 4.6 fb(-1). The measurement is performed by reconstructing the boosted W or Z bosons in single jets. The reconstructed jet mass is used to identify the W and Z bosons, and a jet substructure method based on energy cluster information in the jet centre-ofmass frame is used to suppress the large multi-jet background. The cross-section for events with a hadronically decaying W or Z boson, with transverse momentum p(T) > 320 GeV and pseudorapidity |eta| < 1.9, is measured to be sigma W+ Z= 8.5 +/- 1.7 pb and is compared to next-to-leading-order calculations. The selected events are further used to study jet grooming techniques.

  • 6. Amole, C.
    et al.
    Andresen, G. B.
    Ashkezari, M. D.
    Baquero-Ruiz, M.
    Bertsche, W.
    Butler, E.
    Cesar, C. L.
    Chapman, S.
    Charlton, M.
    Deller, A.
    Eriksson, S.
    Fajans, J.
    Friesen, T.
    Fujiwara, M. C.
    Gill, D. R.
    Gutierrez, A.
    Hangst, J. S.
    Hardy, W. N.
    Hayden, M. E.
    Humphries, A. J.
    Hydomako, R.
    Kurchaninov, L.
    Jonsell, Svante
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Madsen, N.
    Menary, S.
    Nolan, P.
    Olchanski, K.
    Olin, A.
    Povilus, A.
    Pusa, P.
    Robicheaux, F.
    Sarid, E.
    Silveira, D. M.
    So, C.
    Storey, J. W.
    Thompson, R. I.
    van der Werf, D. P.
    Wurtele, J. S.
    Discriminating between antihydrogen and mirror-trapped antiprotons in a minimum-B trap2012In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 14, p. 015010-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recently, antihydrogen atoms were trapped at CERN in a magnetic minimum (minimum-B) trap formed by superconducting octupole and mirror magnet coils. The trapped antiatoms were detected by rapidly turning off these magnets, thereby eliminating the magnetic minimum and releasing any antiatoms contained in the trap. Once released, these antiatoms quickly hit the trap wall, whereupon the positrons and antiprotons in the antiatoms annihilate. The antiproton annihilations produce easily detected signals; we used these signals to prove that we trapped antihydrogen. However, our technique could be confounded by mirror-trapped antiprotons, which would produce seemingly identical annihilation signals upon hitting the trap wall. In this paper, we discuss possible sources of mirror-trapped antiprotons and show that antihydrogen and antiprotons can be readily distinguished, often with the aid of applied electric fields, by analyzing the annihilation locations and times. We further discuss the general properties of antiproton and antihydrogen trajectories in this magnetic geometry, and reconstruct the antihydrogen energy distribution from the measured annihilation time history.

  • 7. Amole, C.
    et al.
    Ashkezari, M. D.
    Baquero-Ruiz, M.
    Bertsche, W.
    Butler, E.
    Capra, A.
    Cesar, C. L.
    Charlton, M.
    Deller, A.
    Evetts, N.
    Eriksson, S.
    Fajans, J.
    Friesen, T.
    Fujiwara, M. C.
    Gill, D. R.
    Gutierrez, A.
    Hangst, J. S.
    Hardy, W. N.
    Hayden, M. E.
    Isaac, C. A.
    Jonsell, Svante
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kurchaninov, L.
    Little, A.
    Madsen, N.
    McKenna, J. T. K.
    Menary, S.
    Napoli, Silvia C.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Olchanski, K.
    Olin, A.
    Pusa, P.
    Rasmussen, C. O.
    Robicheaux, F.
    Sarid, E.
    Silveira, D. M.
    So, C.
    Stracka, S.
    Tharp, T.
    Thompson, R. I.
    van der Werf, D. P.
    Wurtele, J. S.
    In situ electromagnetic field diagnostics with an electron plasma in a Penning-Malmberg trap2014In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 16, p. 013037-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate a novel detection method for the cyclotron resonance frequency of an electron plasma in a Penning-Malmberg trap. With this technique, the electron plasma is used as an in situ diagnostic tool for the measurement of the static magnetic field and the microwave electric field in the trap. The cyclotron motion of the electron plasma is excited by microwave radiation and the temperature change of the plasma is measured non-destructively by monitoring the plasma's quadrupole mode frequency. The spatially resolved microwave electric field strength can be inferred from the plasma temperature change and the magnetic field is found through the cyclotron resonance frequency. These measurements were used extensively in the recently reported demonstration of resonant quantum interactions with antihydrogen.

  • 8.
    Andersson, O.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Heydari, Hoshang
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Operational geometric phase for mixed quantum states2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15, p. 053006-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The geometric phase has found a broad spectrum of applications in both classical and quantum physics, such as condensed matter and quantum computation. In this paper, we introduce an operational geometric phase for mixed quantum states, based on spectral weighted traces of holonomies, and we prove that it generalizes the standard definition of the geometric phase for mixed states, which is based on quantum interferometry. We also introduce higher order geometric phases, and prove that under a fairly weak, generically satisfied, requirement, there is always a well-defined geometric phase of some order. Our approach applies to general unitary evolutions of both non-degenerate and degenerate mixed states. Moreover, since we provide an explicit formula for the geometric phase that can be easily implemented, it is particularly well suited for computations in quantum physics.

  • 9. Aurell, Erik
    et al.
    Eichhorn, Ralf
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    On the von Neumann entropy of a bath linearly coupled to a driven quantum system2015In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 17, article id 065007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The change of the von Neumann entropy of a set of harmonic oscillators initially in thermal equilibrium and interacting linearly with an externally driven quantum system is computed by adapting the Feynman-Vernon influence functional formalism. This quantum entropy production has the form of the expectation value of three functionals of the forward and backward paths describing the system history in the Feynman-Vernon theory. In the classical limit of Kramers-Langevin dynamics (Caldeira-Leggett model) these functionals combine to three terms, where the first is the entropy production functional of stochastic thermodynamics, the classical work done by the system on the environment in units of k(B)T, and the second and the third other functionals which have no analogue in stochastic thermodynamics.

  • 10.
    Bergstrom, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dark Matter Candidates2009In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 11, p. 105006-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An overview is given of various dark matter candidates. Among the many suggestions given in the literature, axions, inert Higgs doublet, sterile neutrinos, supersymmetric particles and Kaluza–Klein particles are discussed. The situation has recently become very interesting with new results on antimatter in the cosmic rays having dark matter as one of the leading possible explanations. Problems arising from this explanation and possible solutions are discussed, and the importance of new measurements is emphasized. If the explanation is indeed dark matter, a whole new field of physics, with unusual although not impossible mass and interaction properties, may soon open itself to discovery

  • 11.
    Brandenburg, Axel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Astronomy. Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). University of Colorado, USA.
    Rogachevskii, Igor
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Kleeorin, Nathan
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel.
    Magnetic concentrations in stratified turbulence: the negative effective magnetic pressure instability2016In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 18, article id 125011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the presence of strong density stratification, hydromagnetic turbulence attains qualitatively new properties: the formation of magnetic flux concentrations. We review here the theoretical foundations of this mechanism in terms of what is now called the negative effective magnetic pressure instability. We also present direct numerical simulations of forced turbulence in strongly stratified layers and discuss the qualitative and quantitative similarities with corresponding mean-field simulations. Finally, the relevance to sunspot formation is discussed.

  • 12.
    Bringmann, Torsten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Particle Models and the Small-Scale Structure of Dark Matter2009In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 11, p. 105027-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The kinetic decoupling of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) in the early universe sets a scale that can directly be translated into a small-scale cutoff in the spectrum of matter density fluctuations. The formalism presented here allows a precise description of the decoupling process and thus the determination of this scale to a high accuracy from the details of the underlying WIMP microphysics. With decoupling temperatures of several MeV to a few GeV, the smallest protohalos to be formed range between 10^{-11} and almost 10^{-3} solar masses -- a somewhat smaller range than what was found earlier using order-of-magnitude estimates for the decoupling temperature; for a given WIMP model, the actual cutoff mass is typically about a factor of 10 greater than derived in that way, though in some cases the difference may be as large as a factor of several 100. Observational consequences and prospects to probe this small-scale cutoff, which would provide a fascinating new window into the particle nature of dark matter, are discussed.

  • 13.
    Budich, Jan Carl
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Trauzettel, Bjoern
    Z(2) Green's function topology of Majorana wires2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15, p. 065006-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We represent the Z(2) topological invariant characterizing a one-dimensional topological superconductor using a Wess-Zumino-Witten dimensional extension. The invariant is formulated in terms of the single-particle Green's function which allows us to classify interacting systems. Employing a recently proposed generalized Berry curvature method, the topological invariant is represented independent of the extra dimension requiring only the single-particle Green's function at zero frequency of the interacting system. Furthermore, a modified twisted boundary conditions approach is used to rigorously define the topological invariant for disordered interacting systems.

  • 14. Buzzicotti, Michele
    et al.
    Bhatnagar, Akshay
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Stockholm Univ, Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Biferale, Luca
    Lanotte, Alessandra S.
    Ray, Samriddhi Sankar
    Lagrangian statistics for Navier-Stokes turbulence under Fourier-mode reduction: fractal and homogeneous decimations2016In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 18, article id 113047Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We study small-scale and high-frequency turbulent fluctuations in three-dimensional flows under Fourier-mode reduction. The Navier-Stokes equations are evolved on a restricted set of modes, obtained as a projection on a fractal or homogeneous Fourier set. We find a strong sensitivity (reduction) of the high-frequency variability of the Lagrangian velocity fluctuations on the degree of mode decimation, similarly to what is already reported for Eulerian statistics. This is quantified by a tendency towards a quasi-Gaussian statistics, i.e., to a reduction of intermittency, at all scales and frequencies. This can be attributed to a strong depletion of vortex filaments and of the vortex stretching mechanism. Nevertheless, we found that Eulerian and Lagrangian ensembles are still connected by a dimensional bridge-relation which is independent of the degree of Fourier-mode decimation.

  • 15. Das, Tanmoy
    et al.
    Balatsky, Alexander V.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Los Alamos National Laboratory United States Department of Energy (DOE) .
    Origin of pressure induced second superconducting dome in AyFe(2-x)Se(2) [A = K, (TI, Rb)]2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15, p. 093045-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent observation of a pressure induced second superconducting phase in A(y)Fe(2-x)Se(2) [A = K, (TI, Rb)] calls for the models of superconductivity that are rich enough to allow for multiple superconducting phases. We propose the model where pressure induces renormalization of band parameters in such a way that it leads to changes in Fermi surface topology even for a fixed electron number. We develop a low-energy effective model, derived from first-principles band-structure calculation at finite pressure, to suggest the phase assignment where a low pressure superconducting state with no hole pocket at the 0 point is a nodeless d-wave state. It evolves into a s(+/-) state at higher pressure when the Fermi surface topology changes and the hole pocket appears. We analyze the pairing interactions using a five band tight binding fitted band structure and find that a strong pairing strength is dependent on pressure. We also evaluate the energy and momentum dependence of neutron spin resonances in each of the phases as verifiable predictions of our proposal.

  • 16. Dish, Sabina
    et al.
    Wetterskog, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Hermann, Raphäel P.
    Wiedenmann, A.
    Vainio, U.
    Salazar-Alvarez, German
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergström, Lennart
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Brückel, Thomas
    Quantitative spatial magnetization distribution in iron oxide nanocubes and nanospheres by polarized small-angle neutron scattering2012In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 14, p. 013025-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By means of polarized small-angle neutron scattering, we have resolved the long-standing challenge of determining the magnetization distribution in magnetic nanoparticles in absolute units. The reduced magnetization, localized in non-interacting nanoparticles, indicates strongly particle shape-dependent surface spin canting with a 0.3(1) and 0.5(1) nm thick surface shell of reduced magnetization found for similar to 9 nm nanospheres and similar to 8.5 nm nanocubes, respectively. Further, the reduced macroscopic magnetization in nanoparticles results not only from surface spin canting, but also from drastically reduced magnetization inside the uniformly magnetized core as compared to the bulk material. Our microscopic results explain the low macroscopic magnetization commonly found in nanoparticles.

  • 17. Eland, J. H. D.
    et al.
    Squibb, R. J.
    Mucke, M.
    Zagorodskikh, S.
    Linusson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Feifel, R.
    Direct observation of three-electron collective decay in a resonant Auger process2015In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 17, article id 122001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using a multi-electron coincidence technique combined with synchrotron radiation we demonstrate the real existence of the elusive three-electron collective process in resonant Auger decay of Kr. The three-electron process is about 40 times weaker than the competing two-electron processes.

  • 18. Faatz, B.
    et al.
    Ploenjes, E.
    Ackermann, S.
    Agababyan, A.
    Asgekar, V.
    Ayvazyan, V.
    Baark, S.
    Baboi, N.
    Balandin, V.
    von Bargen, N.
    Bican, Y.
    Bilani, O.
    Boedewadt, J.
    Boehnert, M.
    Boespflug, R.
    Bonfigt, S.
    Bolz, H.
    Borges, F.
    Borkenhagen, O.
    Brachmanski, M.
    Braune, M.
    Brinkmann, A.
    Brovko, O.
    Bruns, T.
    Castro, P.
    Chen, J.
    Czwalinna, M. K.
    Damker, H.
    Decking, W.
    Degenhardt, M.
    Delfs, A.
    Delfs, T.
    Deng, H.
    Dressel, M.
    Duhme, H-T
    Duesterer, S.
    Eckoldt, H.
    Eislage, A.
    Felber, M.
    Feldhaus, J.
    Gessler, P.
    Gibau, M.
    Golubeva, N.
    Golz, T.
    Gonschior, J.
    Grebentsov, A.
    Grecki, M.
    Gruen, C.
    Grunewald, S.
    Hacker, K.
    Haenisch, L.
    Hage, A.
    Hans, T.
    Hass, E.
    Hauberg, A.
    Hensler, O.
    Hesse, M.
    Heuck, K.
    Hidvegi, Attila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Holz, M.
    Honkavaara, K.
    Hoeppner, H.
    Ignatenko, A.
    Jaeger, J.
    Jastrow, U.
    Kammering, R.
    Karstensen, S.
    Kaukher, A.
    Kay, H.
    Keil, B.
    Klose, K.
    Kocharyan, V.
    Koepke, M.
    Koerfer, M.
    Kook, W.
    Krause, B.
    Krebs, O.
    Kreis, S.
    Krivan, F.
    Kuhlmann, J.
    Kuhlmann, M.
    Kube, G.
    Laarmann, T.
    Lechner, C.
    Lederer, S.
    Leuschner, A.
    Liebertz, D.
    Liebing, J.
    Liedtke, A.
    Lilje, L.
    Limberg, T.
    Lipka, D.
    Liu, B.
    Lorbeer, B.
    Ludwig, K.
    Mahn, H.
    Marinkovic, G.
    Martens, C.
    Marutzky, F.
    Maslocv, M.
    Meissner, D.
    Mildner, N.
    Miltchev, V.
    Molnar, S.
    Mross, D.
    Mueller, F.
    Neumann, R.
    Neumann, P.
    Noelle, D.
    Obier, F.
    Pelzer, M.
    Peters, H-B
    Petersen, K.
    Petrosyan, A.
    Petrosyan, G.
    Petrosyan, L.
    Petrosyan, V.
    Petrov, A.
    Pfeiffer, S.
    Piotrowski, A.
    Pisarov, Z.
    Plath, T.
    Pototzki, P.
    Prandolini, M. J.
    Prenting, J.
    Priebe, G.
    Racky, B.
    Ramm, T.
    Rehlich, K.
    Riedel, R.
    Roggli, M.
    Roehling, M.
    Roensch-Schulenburg, J.
    Rossbach, J.
    Rybnikov, V.
    Schaefer, J.
    Schaffran, J.
    Schlarb, H.
    Schlesselmann, G.
    Schloesser, M.
    Schmid, P.
    Schmidt, C.
    Schmidt-Foehre, F.
    Schmitz, M.
    Schneidmiller, E.
    Schoeps, A.
    Scholz, M.
    Schreiber, S.
    Schuett, K.
    Schuetz, U.
    Schulte-Schrepping, H.
    Schulz, M.
    Shabunov, A.
    Smirnov, P.
    Sombrowski, E.
    Sorokin, A.
    Sparr, B.
    Spengler, J.
    Staack, M.
    Stadler, M.
    Stechmann, C.
    Steffen, B.
    Stojanovic, N.
    Sychev, V.
    Syresin, E.
    Tanikawa, T.
    Tavella, F.
    Tesch, N.
    Tiedtke, K.
    Tischer, M.
    Treusch, R.
    Tripathi, S.
    Vagin, P.
    Vetrov, P.
    Vilcins, S.
    Vogt, M.
    Wagner, A. de Zubiaurre
    Wamsat, T.
    Weddig, H.
    Weichert, G.
    Weigelt, H.
    Wentowski, N.
    Wiebers, C.
    Wilksen, T.
    Willner, A.
    Wittenburg, K.
    Wohlenberg, T.
    Wortmann, J.
    Wurth, W.
    Yurkov, M.
    Zagorodnov, I.
    Zemella, J.
    Simultaneous operation of two soft x-ray free-electron lasers driven by one linear accelerator2016In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 18, article id 062002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extreme-ultraviolet to x-ray free-electron lasers (FELs) in operation for scientific applications are up to now single-user facilities. While most FELs generate around 100 photon pulses per second, FLASH at DESY can deliver almost two orders of magnitude more pulses in this time span due to its superconducting accelerator technology. This makes the facility a prime candidate to realize the next step in FELs-dividing the electron pulse trains into several FEL lines and delivering photon pulses to several users at the same time. Hence, FLASH has been extended with a second undulator line and self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) is demonstrated in both FELs simultaneously. FLASH can now deliver MHz pulse trains to two user experiments in parallel with individually selected photon beam characteristics. First results of the capabilities of this extension are shown with emphasis on independent variation of wavelength, repetition rate, and photon pulse length.

  • 19. Geissler, F.
    et al.
    Budich, Jan Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Trauzettel, B.
    Group theoretical and topological analysis of the quantum spin Hall effect in silicene2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Silicene consists of a monolayer of silicon atoms in a buckled honeycomb structure. It was recently discovered that the symmetry of such a system allows for interesting Rashba spin-orbit effects. A perpendicular electric field is able to couple to the sublattice pseudospin, making it possible to electrically tune and close the band gap. Therefore, external electric fields may generate a topological phase transition from a topological insulator to a normal insulator (or semimetal) and vice versa. The contribution of the present paper to the study of silicene is twofold. Firstly, we perform a group theoretical analysis to systematically construct the Hamiltonian in the vicinity of the K points of the Brillouin zone and find an additional, electric field induced spin-orbit term, that is allowed by symmetry. Subsequently, we identify a tight-binding model that corresponds to the group theoretically derived Hamiltonian near the K points. Secondly, we start from this tight-binding model to analyze the topological phase diagram of silicene by an explicit calculation of the Z(2) topological invariant of the band structure. To this end, we calculate the Z(2) topological invariant of the honeycomb lattice in a manifestly gauge invariant way which allows us to include S-z symmetry breaking terms-like Rashba spin-orbit interaction-into the topological analysis. Interestingly, we find that the interplay of a Rashba and an intrinsic spin-orbit term can generate a non-trivial quantum spin Hall phase in silicene. This is in sharp contrast to the more extensively studied honeycomb system graphene where Rashba spin-orbit interaction is known to compete with the quantum spin Hall effect in a detrimental way.

  • 20.
    Hansson, T. H.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Karlhede, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sato, Masatoshi
    Topological field theory for p-wave superconductors2012In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 14, p. 063017-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a topological field theory for a spinless two-dimensional (2D) chiral superconductor (SC) that contains fundamental Majorana fields. Due to a fermionic gauge symmetry, the Majorana modes survive as dynamical degrees of freedom only at magnetic vortex cores, and on edges. We argue that these modes have the topological properties pertinent to a p-wave SC including the non-Abelian braiding statistics, and we support this claim by calculating the ground state degeneracy on a torus. We also briefly discuss the connection to the Moore-Read Pfaffian quantum Hall state and extensions to the spinfull case and to 3D topological SCs.

  • 21. Huang, Zhoushen
    et al.
    Arovas, Daniel P.
    Balatsky, Alexander V.
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Impurity scattering in Weyl semimetals and their stability classification2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15, p. art.nr.-123019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weyl semimetals (WS) are a new class of Dirac-type materials exhibiting a phase with bulk energy nodes and an associated vanishing density of states (DOS). We investigate the stability of this nodal DOS suppression in the presence of local impurities and consider whether or not such a suppression can be lifted by impurity-induced resonances. We find that while a scalar (chemical potential type) impurity can always induce a resonance at arbitrary energy and hence lift the DOS suppression at Dirac/Weyl nodes, for many other impurity types (e.g. magnetic or orbital mixing), resonances are forbidden in a wide range of energy. We investigate a four-band tight-binding model of WS adapted from a physical heterostructure construction due to Burkov et al (2011 Phys. Rev. B 84 235126), and represent a local impurity potential by a strength g as well as a matrix structure Lambda. A general framework is developed to analyze this resonance dichotomy and make connection with the phase shift picture in scattering theory, as well as to determine the relation between resonance energy and impurity strength g. A complete classification of impurities based on Lambda, based on their effect on nodal DOS suppression, is tabulated. We also discuss the differences between continuum and lattice approaches.

  • 22.
    Jonsell, Svante
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Armour, E. A. G.
    Plummer, M.
    Liu, Y.
    Todd, A. C.
    Helium-antihydrogen scattering at low energies2012In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 14, p. 035013-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We calculate cross sections for helium-antihydrogen scattering for energies up to 0.01 atomic unit. Our calculation includes elastic scattering, direct antiproton-alpha particle annihilation and rearrangement into He(+)p(-) and ground-state positronium. Elastic scattering is calculated within the Born-Oppenheimer approximation using the potential calculated by Strasburger et al (2005 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 38 3091). Matrix elements for rearrangement are calculated using the T-matrix in the distorted wave approximation, with the initial state represented by Hylleraas-type functions. The strong force, leading to direct annihilation, was included as a short-range boundary condition in terms of the strong-force scattering length.

  • 23.
    Jonsell, Svante
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Charlton, M.
    Formation of antihydrogen beams from positron-antiproton interactions2019In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 21, article id 073020Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of a beam of antihydrogen atoms when antiprotons pass through cold, dense positron plasmas is simulated for various plasma properties and antiproton injection energies. There are marked dependences of the fraction of injected antiprotons which are emitted as antihydrogen in a beam-like configuration upon the temperature of the positrons, and upon the antiproton kinetic energy. Yields as high as 13% are found at the lowest positron temperatures simulated here (5K) and at antiproton kinetic energies below about 0.1 eV. By 1 eV the best yields are as low as 10(-3), falling by about two orders of magnitude with an increase of the positron temperature to 50 K. Example distributions for the antihydrogen angular emission, binding energy and kinetic energy are presented and discussed. Comparison is made with experimental information, where possible.

  • 24.
    Jonsell, Svante
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Charlton, M.
    On the formation of trappable antihydrogen2018In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 20, article id 043049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The formation of antihydrogen atoms from antiprotons injected into a positron plasma is simulated, focussing on the fraction that fulfil the conditions necessary for confinement of anti-atoms in a magnetic minimum trap. Trapping fractions of around 10(-4) are found under conditions similar to those used in recent experiments, and in reasonable accord with their results. We have studied the behaviour of the trapped fraction at various positron plasma densities and temperatures and found that collisional effects play a beneficial role via a redistribution of the antihydrogen magnetic moment, allowing enhancements of the yield of low-field seeking states that are amenable to trapping.

  • 25. Joshi, Siddarth Koduru
    et al.
    Pienaar, Jacques
    Ralph, Timothy C.
    Cacciapuoti, Luigi
    McCutcheon, Will
    Rarity, John
    Giggenbach, Dirk
    Lim, Jin Gyu
    Makarov, Vadim
    Fuentes, Ivette
    Scheidl, Thomas
    Beckert, Erik
    Bourennane, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bruschi, David Edward
    Cabello, Adam
    Capmany, Jose
    Carrasco-Casado, Alberto
    Diamanti, Eleni
    Dusek, Miloslav
    Elser, Dominique
    Gulinatti, Angelo
    Hadfield, Robert H.
    Jennewein, Thomas
    Kaltenbaek, Rainer
    Krainak, Michael A.
    Lo, Hoi-Kwong
    Marquardt, Christoph
    Milburn, Gerard
    Peev, Momtchil
    Poppe, Andreas
    Pruneri, Valerio
    Renner, Renato
    Salomon, Christophe
    Skaar, Johannes
    Solomos, Nikolaos
    Stipcevic, Mario
    Torres, Juan P.
    Toyoshima, Morio
    Villoresi, Paolo
    Walrnsley, Ian
    Weihs, Gregor
    Weinfurter, Harald
    Zeilinger, Anton
    Zukowski, Marek
    Ursin, Rupert
    Space QUEST mission proposal: experimentally testing decoherence due to gravity2018In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 20, article id 063016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of quantum systems on curved space-times lack sufficient experimental verification. Some speculative theories suggest that quantum correlations, such as entanglement, may exhibit different behavior to purely classical correlations in curved space. By measuring this effect or lack thereof, we can test the hypotheses behind several such models. For instance, as predicted by Ralph et al [5] and Ralph and Pienaar [1], a bipartite entangled system could decohere if each particle traversed through a different gravitational field gradient. We propose to study this effect in a ground to space uplink scenario. We extend the above theoretical predictions of Ralph and coworkers and discuss the scientific consequences of detecting/failing to detect the predicted gravitational decoherence. We present a detailed mission design of the European Space Agency's Space QUEST (Space-Quantum Entanglement Space Test) mission, and study the feasibility of the mission scheme.

  • 26. Kibis, O.
    et al.
    Kyriienko, Oleksandr
    Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). ITMO University, Russia.
    Shelykh, I. A.
    Structure of surface electronic states in strained mercury telluride2019In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 21, article id 043016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present the theory describing the various surface electronic states arisen from the mixing of conduction and valence bands in a strained mercury telluride (HgTe) bulk material. We demonstrate that the strain-induced band gap in the Brillouin zone center of HgTe results in the surface states of two different kinds. Surface states of the first kind exist in the small region of electron wave vectors near the center of the Brillouin zone and have the Dirac linear electron dispersion characteristic for topological states. The surface states of the second kind exist only far from the center of the Brillouin zone and have the parabolic dispersion for large wave vectors. The structure of these surface electronic states is studied both analytically and numerically in the broad range of their parameters, aiming to develop its systematic understanding for the relevant model Hamiltonian. The results bring attention to the rich surface physics relevant for topological systems.

  • 27. Kleinmann, Matthias
    et al.
    Guehne, Otfried
    Portillo, Jose R.
    Larsson, Jan-Ake
    Cabello, Adan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Memory cost of quantum contextuality2011In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 13, p. 113011-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The simulation of quantum effects requires certain classical resources, and quantifying them is an important step to characterize the difference between quantum and classical physics. For a simulation of the phenomenon of state-independent quantum contextuality, we show that the minimum amount of memory used by the simulation is the critical resource. We derive optimal simulation strategies for important cases and prove that reproducing the results of sequential measurements on a two-qubit system requires more memory than the information-carrying capacity of the system.

  • 28.
    Kothe, Christian
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Björk, Gunnar
    Inoue, Shuichiro
    Bourennane, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    On the efficiency of quantum lithography2011In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 13, p. 043028-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum lithography promises, in principle, unlimited feature resolution, independent of wavelength. However, in the literature, at least two different theoretical descriptions of quantum lithography exist. They differ in the extent to which they predict that the photons retain spatial correlation from generation to absorption, and although both predict the same feature size, they vastly differ in predicting how efficiently a quantum lithographic pattern can be exposed. Until recently, essentially all quantum lithography experiments have been performed in such a way that it is difficult to distinguish between the two theoretical explanations. However, last year an experiment was performed that gives different outcomes for the two theories. We comment on the experiment and show that the model that fits the data unfortunately indicates that the trade-off between resolution and efficiency in quantum lithography is very unfavourable.

  • 29. Kunnus, Kristjan
    et al.
    Josefsson, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rajkovic, Ivan
    Schreck, Simon
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Phys, AlbaNova Univ Ctr, SE-10691 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Quevedo, Wilson
    Beye, Martin
    Grübel, Sebastian
    Scholz, Mirko
    Nordlund, Dennis
    Zhang, Wenkai
    Hartsock, Robert W.
    Gaffney, Kelly J.
    Schlotter, William F.
    Turner, Joshua J.
    Kennedy, Brian
    Hennies, Franz
    Techert, Simone
    Wernet, Philippe
    Odelius, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Föhlisch, Alexander
    Anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering for atom specific and excited state selective dynamics2016In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 18, article id 103011Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultrafast electronic and structural dynamics of matter govern rate and selectivity of chemical reactions, as well as phase transitions and efficient switching in functional materials. Since x-rays determine electronic and structural properties with elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity, short pulse x-ray sources have become central enablers of ultrafast science. Despite of these strengths, ultrafast x-rays have been poor at picking up excited state moieties from the unexcited ones. With time-resolved anti-Stokes resonant x-ray Raman scattering (AS-RXRS) performed at the LCLS, and ab initio theory we establish background free excited state selectivity in addition to the elemental, chemical, orbital and magnetic selectivity of x-rays. This unparalleled selectivity extracts low concentration excited state species along the pathway of photo induced ligand exchange of Fe(CO)(5) in ethanol. Conceptually a full theoretical treatment of all accessible insights to excited state dynamics with AS-RXRS with transform-limited x-ray pulses is given-which will be covered experimentally by upcoming transform-limited x-ray sources.

  • 30. Madsen, N.
    et al.
    Robicheaux, F.
    Jonsell, Svante
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Antihydrogen trapping assisted by sympathetically cooled positrons2014In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 16, p. 063046-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, is of interest for use in precision tests of nature ' s fundamental symmetries. Antihydrogen formed by carefully merging cold plasmas of positrons and antiprotons has recently been trapped in magnetic traps. The efficiency of trapping is strongly dependent on the temperature of the nascent antihydrogen, which, to be trapped, must have a kinetic energy less than the trap depth of similar to 0.5 K k(B). In the conditions in the ALPHA experiment, the antihydrogen temperature seems dominated by the temperature of the positron plasma used for the synthesis. Cold positrons are therefore of paramount interest in that experiment. In this paper, we propose an alternative route to make ultra-cold positrons for enhanced antihydrogen trapping. We investigate theoretically how to extend previously successful sympathetic cooling of positrons by laser-cooled positive ions to be used for antihydrogen trapping. Using simulations, we investigate the effectiveness of such cooling in conditions similar to those in ALPHA, and discuss how the formation process and the nascent antihydrogen may be influenced by the presence of positive ions. We argue that this technique is a viable alternative to methods such as evaporative and adiabatic cooling, and may overcome limitations faced by these. Ultra-cold positrons, once available, may also be of interest for a range of other applications.

  • 31. Marino, E. C.
    et al.
    Niemeyer, D.
    Alves, Van Sérgio
    Hansson, Thors Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita).
    Moroz, Sergej
    Screening and topological order in thin superconducting films2018In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 20, article id 083049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We derive an effective two-dimensional low-energy theory for thin superconducting films coupled to a three-dimensional fluctuating electromagnetic field. Using this theory we discuss plasma oscillations, interactions between charges and vortices and extract the energy of a vortex. Having found that the effective theory properly describes the long-distance physics, we then use it to investigate to what extent the superconducting film is a topologically ordered phase of matter.

  • 32. Mironowicz, Piotr
    et al.
    Tavakoli, Armin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. National Quantum Information Centre in Gdańsk, Poland.
    Hameedi, Alley
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Marques, Breno
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil.
    Pawlowski, Marcin
    Bourennane, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Increased certification of semi-device independent random numbers using many inputs and more post-processing2016In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 18, article id 065004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Quantum communication with systems of dimension larger than two provides advantages in information processing tasks. Examples include higher rates of key distribution and random number generation. The main disadvantage of using such multi-dimensional quantum systems is the increased complexity of the experimental setup. Here, we analyze a not-so-obvious problem: the relation between randomness certification and computational requirements of the post-processing of experimental data. In particular, we consider semi-device independent randomness certification from an experiment using a four dimensional quantum system to violate the classical bound of a random access code. Using state-of-the-art techniques, a smaller quantum violation requires more computational power to demonstrate randomness, which at some point becomes impossible with today's computers although the randomness is (probably) still there. We show that by dedicating more input settings of the experiment to randomness certification, then by more computational postprocessing of the experimental data which corresponds to a quantum violation, one may increase the amount of certified randomness. Furthermore, we introduce a method that significantly lowers the computational complexity of randomness certification. Our results show how more randomness can be generated without altering the hardware and indicate a path for future semi-device independent protocols to follow.

  • 33. Mucke, M.
    et al.
    Zhaunerchyk, Vitali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Frasinski, L. J.
    Squibb, R. J.
    Siano, M.
    Eland, J. H. D.
    Linusson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Salén, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    vab der Meulen, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Thomas, Richard D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Larsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Foucar, L.
    Ullrich, J.
    Motomura, K.
    Mondal, S.
    Ueda, K.
    Osipov, T.
    Fang, L.
    Murphy, B. F.
    Berrah, N.
    Bostedt, C.
    Bozek, J. D.
    Schorb, S.
    Messerschmidt, M.
    Glownia, J. M.
    Cryan, J. P.
    Coffee, R. N.
    Takahashi, O.
    Wada, S.
    Piancastelli, M. N.
    Richter, R.
    Prince, K. C.
    Feifel, R.
    Covariance mapping of two-photon double core hole states in C2H2 and C2H6 produced by an x-ray free electron laser2015In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 17, article id 073002Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few-photon ionization and relaxation processes in acetylene (C2H2) and ethane (C2H6) were investigated at the linac coherent light source x-ray free electron laser (FEL) at SLAC, Stanford using a highly efficient multi-particle correlation spectroscopy technique based on a magnetic bottle. The analysis method of covariance mapping has been applied and enhanced, allowing us to identify electron pairs associated with double core hole (DCH) production and competing multiple ionization processes including Auger decay sequences. The experimental technique and the analysis procedure are discussed in the light of earlier investigations of DCH studies carried out at the same FEL and at third generation synchrotron radiation sources. In particular, we demonstrate the capability of the covariance mapping technique to disentangle the formation of molecular DCH states which is barely feasible with conventional electron spectroscopy methods.

  • 34.
    Pinheiro, Fernanda
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics (Nordita). Universitat zu Koln, Germany.
    Martikainen, Jani-Petri
    Larson, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Universität zu Köln, Germany.
    Phases of d-orbital bosons in optical lattices2015In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 17, article id 053004Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the properties of bosonic atoms loaded into the d bands of an isotropic square optical lattice. Following the recent experimental success reported in [Y. Zhai et al., Phys. Rev. A 87, 063638 (2013)], in which populating d bands with a 99% fidelity was demonstrated, we present a theoretical study of the possible phases that can appear in this system. Using the Gutzwiller ansatz for the three d band orbitals we map the boundaries of the Mott insulating phases. For not too large occupation, two of the orbitals are predominantly occupied, while the third, of a slightly higher energy, remains almost unpopulated. In this regime, in the superfluid phase we find the formation of a vortex lattice, where the vortices come in vortex/anti-vortex pairs with two pairs locked to every site. Due to the orientation of the vortices time-reversal symmetry is spontaneously broken. This state also breaks a discrete Z2-symmetry. We further derive an effective spin-1/2 model that describe the relevant physics of the lowest Mott-phase with unit filling. We argue that the corresponding two dimensional phase diagram should be rich with several different phases. We also explain how to generate antisymmetric spin interactions that can give rise to novel effects like spin canting.

  • 35.
    Ranitovic, Predrag
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Tong, X. M.
    Gramkow, B.
    De, S.
    DePaola, B.
    Singh, K. P.
    Cao, W.
    Magrakvelidze, M.
    Ray, D.
    Bocharova, I.
    Mashiko, H.
    Sandhu, A.
    Gagnon, E.
    Murnane, M. M.
    Kapteyn, H. C.
    Litvinyuk, I.
    Cocke, C. L.
    IR-assisted ionization of helium by attosecond extreme ultraviolet radiation2010In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 12, p. 13008-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Attosecond science has opened up the possibility of manipulating electrons on their fundamental timescales. Here, we use both theory and experiment to investigate ionization dynamics in helium on the attosecond timescale by simultaneously irradiating the atom with a soft x-ray attosecond pulse train (APT) and an ultrafast laser pulse. Because the APT has resolution in both energy and time, we observe processes that could not be observed without resolution in both domains simultaneously. We show that resonant absorption is important in the excitation of helium and that small changes in energies of harmonics that comprise the APT can result in large changes in the ionization process. With the help of theory, ionization pathways for the infrared-assisted excitation and ionization of helium by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulses have been identified and simple model interpretations have been developed that should be of general applicability to more complex systems (Zewail A 2000 J. Phys. Chem. A 104 5660-94).

  • 36.
    Rådmark, Magnus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Żukowski, Marek
    Institute for Theoretical Physics and Astrophysics, Uniwersytet Gdański.
    Bourennane, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Experimental high fidelity six-photon entangled state for telecloning protocols2009In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 11, no 103016Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We experimentally generate and characterize a six-photon polarizationentangled state, which is usually called ‘9+6 ’. This is realized with a filteringprocedure of triple emissions of entangled photon pairs from a single source,which does not use any interferometric overlaps. The setup is very stable and weobserve the six-photon state with high fidelity. The observed state can be usedfor demonstrations of telecloning and secret sharing protocols.

  • 37. Suorsa, J.
    et al.
    Viefers, S.
    Hansson, Thors Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A general approach to quantum Hall hierarchies2011In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 13, p. 075006-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Abelian hierarchy of quantum Hall states accounts for most of the states in the lowest Landau level, and there is evidence of a similar hierarchy of non-Abelian states emanating from the nu = 5/2 Moore-Read state in the second Landau level. Extending a recently developed formalism for hierarchical quasihole condensation, we present a theory that allows for the explicit construction of the ground state wave function, as well as its quasiparticle excitations, for any state based on the Abelian hierarchy. We relate our construction to structures in rational conformal field theory and stress the importance of using coherent state wave functions, which allows us to formulate an extension of the bulk-edge correspondence that was conjectured by Moore and Read. Finally, we study the proposed ground state wave functions in the limiting geometry of a thin torus and argue that they coincide with the known exact results.

  • 38.
    Åsman, Barbro
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Johansen, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Johansson, K. E.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Khandanyan, Hovhannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kim, Hyeon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ohm, Christian C.
    CERN.
    Papadelis, Aras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Plucinski, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Sellden, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Measurement of hard double-parton interactions in W(-> lv) plus 2-jet events at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15, p. 033038-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The production of W bosons in association with two jets in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of root s = 7 TeV has been analysed for the presence of double-parton interactions using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 pb(-1), collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The fraction of events arising from double-parton interactions, f(DP)((D)), has been measured through the p(T) balance between the two jets and amounts to f(DP)((D)) = 0.08 +/- 0.01 (stat.) +/- 0.02 (sys.) for jets with transverse momentum p(T) > 20 GeV and rapidity vertical bar y vertical bar < 2.8. This corresponds to a measurement of the effective area parameter for hard double-parton interactions of sigma(eff) = 15 +/- 3 (stat.)(-3)(+5) (sys.) mb.

  • 39.
    Åsman, Barbro
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Johansen, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Johansson, K. Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Khandanyan, Hovhannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kim, Hyeon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ohm, Christian C.
    CERN.
    Papadelis, Aras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Plucinski, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Sellden, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Search for WH production with a light Higgs boson decaying to prompt electron-jets in proton-proton collisions at root s=7 TeV with the ATLAS detector2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15, p. 043009-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A search is performed for WH production with a light Higgs boson decaying to hidden-sector particles resulting in clusters of collimated electrons, known as electron-jets. The search is performed with 2.04 fb(-1) of data collected in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in proton-proton collisions at root s = 7 TeV. One event satisfying the signal selection criteria is observed, which is consistent with the expected background rate. Limits on the product of the WH production cross section and the branching ratio of a Higgs boson decaying to prompt electron-jets are calculated as a function of a Higgs boson mass in the range from 100 to 140 GeV.

  • 40.
    Åsman, Barbro
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bendtz, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Johansen, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Johansson, K. Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Khandanyan, Hovhannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Kim, Hyeon
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Klimek, Pawel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ohm, Christian C.
    CERN.
    Papadelis, Aras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sellden, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Silverstein, Samuel B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Search for extra dimensions in diphoton events from proton-proton collisions at root s=7 TeV in the ATLAS detector at the LHC2013In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 15, p. 043007-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The large difference between the Planck scale and the electroweak scale, known as the hierarchy problem, is addressed in certain models through the postulate of extra spatial dimensions. A search for evidence of extra spatial dimensions in the diphoton channel has been performed using the full set of proton-proton collisions at root s = 7 TeV recorded in 2011 with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. This dataset corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.9 fb(-1). The diphoton invariant mass spectrum is observed to be in good agreement with the Standard Model expectation. In the context of the model proposed by Arkani-Hamed, Dimopoulos and Dvali, 95% confidence level lower limits of between 2.52 and 3.92 TeV are set on the ultraviolet cutoff scale MS depending on the number of extra dimensions and the theoretical formalism used. In the context of the Randall-Sundrum model, a lower limit of 2.06 (1.00) TeV at 95% confidence level is set on the mass of the lightest graviton for couplings of k/(M) over bar (Pl) = 0.1(0.01). Combining with the ATLAS dilepton searches based on the 2011 data, the 95% confidence level lower limit on the Randall-Sundrum graviton mass is further tightened to 2.23 (1.03) TeV for k/(M) over bar (Pl) = 0.1(0.01).

  • 41.
    Åsman, Barbro
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hidvégi, Attila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Johansen, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Johansson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lesser, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Lundberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Milstead, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Nordkvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Papadelis, Aras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Ramstedt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Selldén, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Silverstein, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Holmgren, Sven-Olof
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A Search for New Physics in Dijet Mass and Angular Distributions in 36 pb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ Collisions at $\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV Measured with the ATLAS Detector2011In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 13, p. 053044-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A search for new interactions and resonances produced in LHC proton-proton (pp) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy root s = 7 TeV was performed with the ATLAS detector. Using a dataset with an integrated luminosity of 36 pb(-1), dijet mass and angular distributions were measured up to dijet masses of similar to 3.5 TeV and were found to be in good agreement with Standard Model predictions. This analysis sets limits at 95% CL on various models for new physics: an excited quark is excluded for mass between 0.60 and 2.64 TeV, an axigluon hypothesis is excluded for axigluon masses between 0.60 and 2.10 TeV and quantum black holes are excluded in models with six extra space-time dimensions for quantum gravity scales between 0.75 and 3.67 TeV. Production cross section limits as a function of dijet mass are set using a simplified Gaussian signal model to facilitate comparisons with other hypotheses. Analysis of the dijet angular distribution using a novel technique simultaneously employing the dijet mass excludes quark contact interactions with a compositeness scale 3 below 9.5 TeV.

  • 42.
    Åsman, Barbro
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Bohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Clément, Christophe
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Eriksson, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gellerstedt, Karl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hellman, Sten
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Hidvégi, Attila
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Johansen, Marianne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Johansson, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Jon-And, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lesser, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Milstead, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Moa, Torbjörn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Nordkvist, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ohm, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Ramstedt, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Selldén, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Silverstein, Samuel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Sjölin, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Strandberg, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Tylmad, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Yang, Zhaoyu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Lundberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmo Particle Physics (OKC).
    Papadelis, Aras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Charged-particle Multiplicities in pp Interactions Measured with the ATLAS detector at the LHC2011In: New Journal of Physics, ISSN 1367-2630, E-ISSN 1367-2630, Vol. 13, p. 053033-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Measurements are presented from proton-proton collisions at centre-of-mass energies of root s = 0.9, 2.36 and 7 TeV recorded with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Events were collected using a single-arm minimum-bias trigger. The charged-particle multiplicity, its dependence on transverse momentum and pseudorapidity and the relationship between the mean transverse momentum and charged-particle multiplicity are measured. Measurements in different regions of phase space are shown, providing diffraction-reduced measurements as well as more inclusive ones. The observed distributions are corrected to well-defined phase-space regions, using model-independent corrections. The results are compared to each other and to various Monte Carlo (MC) models, including a new AMBT1 pythia6 tune. In all the kinematic regions considered, the particle multiplicities are higher than predicted by the MC models. The central charged-particle multiplicity per event and unit of pseudorapidity, for tracks with p(T) > 100 MeV, is measured to be 3.483 +/- 0.009 (stat) +/- 0.106 (syst) at root s = 0.9 TeV and 5.630 +/- 0.003 (stat) +/- 0.169 (syst) at root s = 7 TeV.

1 - 42 of 42
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