Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Faranda, Davide
    et al.
    Messori, Gabriele
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Alvarez-Castro, M. Carmen
    Yiou, Pascal
    Dynamical properties and extremes of Northern Hemisphere climate fields over the past 60 years2017In: Nonlinear processes in geophysics, ISSN 1023-5809, E-ISSN 1607-7946, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 713-725Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atmospheric dynamics are described by a set of partial differential equations yielding an infinite-dimensional phase space. However, the actual trajectories followed by the system appear to be constrained to a finite-dimensional phase space, i.e. a strange attractor. The dynamical properties of this attractor are difficult to determine due to the complex nature of atmospheric motions. A first step to simplify the problem is to focus on observables which affect - or are linked to phenomena which affect - human welfare and activities, such as sea-level pressure, 2m temperature, and precipitation frequency. We make use of recent advances in dynamical systems theory to estimate two instantaneous dynamical properties of the above fields for the Northern Hemisphere: local dimension and persistence. We then use these metrics to characterize the seasonality of the different fields and their interplay. We further analyse the large-scale anomaly patterns corresponding to phase-space extremes - namely time steps at which the fields display extremes in their instantaneous dynamical properties. The analysis is based on the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, over the period 1948-2013. The results show that (i) despite the high dimensionality of atmospheric dynamics, the Northern Hemisphere sea-level pressure and temperature fields can on average be described by roughly 20 degrees of freedom; (ii) the precipitation field has a higher dimensionality; and (iii) the seasonal forcing modulates the variability of the dynamical indicators and affects the occurrence of phase-space extremes. We further identify a number of robust correlations between the dynamical properties of the different variables.

  • 2.
    Hannachi, Abdelwaheb
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology .
    Turner, A. G.
    20th century intraseasonal Asian monsoon dynamics viewed from Isomap2013In: Nonlinear processes in geophysics, ISSN 1023-5809, E-ISSN 1607-7946, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 725-741Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Asian summer monsoon is a high-dimensional and highly nonlinear phenomenon involving considerable moisture transport towards land from the ocean, and is critical for the whole region. We have used daily ECMWF reanalysis (ERA-40) sea-level pressure (SLP) anomalies on the seasonal cycle, over the region 50-145 degrees E, 20 degrees S-35 degrees N, to study the nonlinearity of the Asian monsoon using Isomap. We have focused on the two-dimensional embedding of the SLP anomalies for ease of interpretation. Unlike the unimodality obtained from tests performed in empirical orthogonal function space, the probability density function, within the two-dimensional Isomap space, turns out to be bimodal. But a clustering procedure applied to the SLP data reveals support for three clusters, which are identified using a three-component bivariate Gaussian mixture model. The modes are found to appear similar to active and break phases of the monsoon over South Asia in addition to a third phase, which shows active conditions over the western North Pacific. Using the low-level wind field anomalies, the active phase over South Asia is found to be characterised by a strengthening and an eastward extension of the Somali jet. However during the break phase, the Somali jet is weakened near southern India, while the monsoon trough in northern India also weakens. Interpretation is aided using the APHRODITE gridded land precipitation product for monsoon Asia. The effect of large-scale seasonal mean monsoon and lower boundary forcing, in the form of ENSO, is also investigated and discussed. The outcome here is that ENSO is shown to perturb the intraseasonal regimes, in agreement with conceptual ideas.

  • 3.
    Magnusson, Linus
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology.
    Källén, Erland
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology.
    Nycander, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Meteorology.
    Initial state perturbations in ensemble forecasting2008In: Nonlinear processes in geophysics, ISSN 1023-5809, E-ISSN 1607-7946, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 751-759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the chaotic nature of atmospheric dynamics, numerical weather prediction systems are sensitive to errors in the initial conditions. To estimate the forecast uncertainty, forecast centres produce ensemble forecasts based on perturbed initial conditions. How to optimally perturb the initial conditions remains an open question and different methods are in use. One is the singular vector (SV) method, adapted by ECMWF, and another is the breeding vector (BV) method (previously used by NCEP). In this study we compare the two methods with a modified version of breeding vectors in a low-order dynamical system (Lorenz-63). We calculate the Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF) of the subspace spanned by the breeding vectors to obtain an orthogonal set of initial perturbations for the model. We will also use Normal Mode perturbations. Evaluating the results, we focus on the fastest growth of a perturbation. The results show a large improvement for the BV-EOF perturbations compared to the non-orthogonalised BV. The BV-EOF technique also shows a larger perturbation growth than the SVs of this system, except for short time-scales. The highest growth rate is found for the second BV-EOF for the long-time scale. The differences between orthogonal and non-orthogonal breeding vectors are also investigated using the ECMWF IFS-model. These results confirm the results from the Loernz-63 model regarding the dependency on orthogonalisation

  • 4. Müller-Hansen, Finn
    et al.
    Cardoso, Manoel F.
    Dalla-Nora, Eloi L.
    Donges, Jonathan F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Heitzig, Jobst
    Kurths, Jürgen
    Thonicke, Kirsten
    A matrix clustering method to explore patterns of land-cover transitions in satellite-derived maps of the Brazilian Amazon2017In: Nonlinear processes in geophysics, ISSN 1023-5809, E-ISSN 1607-7946, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 113-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in land-use systems in tropical regions, including deforestation, are a key challenge for global sustainability because of their huge impacts on green-house gas emissions, local climate and biodiversity. However, the dynamics of land-use and land-cover change in regions of frontier expansion such as the Brazilian Amazon are not yet well understood because of the complex interplay of ecological and socioeconomic drivers. In this paper, we combine Markov chain analysis and complex network methods to identify regimes of land-cover dynamics from land-cover maps (TerraClass) derived from high-resolution (30 m) satellite imagery. We estimate regional transition probabilities between different land-cover types and use clustering analysis and community detection algorithms on similarity networks to explore patterns of dominant land- cover transitions. We find that land- cover transition probabilities in the Brazilian Amazon are heterogeneous in space, and adjacent subregions tend to be assigned to the same clusters. When focusing on transitions from single land- cover types, we uncover patterns that reflect major regional differences in land-cover dynamics. Our method is able to summarize regional patterns and thus complements studies performed at the local scale.

  • 5. Nocke, T.
    et al.
    Buschmann, S.
    Donges, Jonathan F.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Marwan, N.
    Schulz, H. -J.
    Tominski, C.
    Review: visual analytics of climate networks2015In: Nonlinear processes in geophysics, ISSN 1023-5809, E-ISSN 1607-7946, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 545-570Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Network analysis has become an important approach in studying complex spatiotemporal behaviour within geophysical observation and simulation data. This new field produces increasing numbers of large geo-referenced networks to be analysed. Particular focus lies currently on the network analysis of the complex statistical interrelationship structure within climatological fields. The standard procedure for such network analyses is the extraction of network measures in combination with static standard visualisation methods. Existing interactive visualisation methods and tools for geo-referenced network exploration are often either not known to the analyst or their potential is not fully exploited. To fill this gap, we illustrate how interactive visual analytics methods in combination with geovisualisation can be tailored for visual climate network investigation. Therefore, the paper provides a problem analysis relating the multiple visualisation challenges to a survey undertaken with network analysts from the research fields of climate and complex systems science. Then, as an overview for the interested practitioner, we review the state-of-the-art in climate network visualisation and provide an overview of existing tools. As a further contribution, we introduce the visual network analytics tools CGV and GTX, providing tailored solutions for climate network analysis, including alternative geographic projections, edge bundling, and 3-D network support. Using these tools, the paper illustrates the application potentials of visual analytics for climate networks based on several use cases including examples from global, regional, and multi-layered climate networks.

  • 6. Sun, A. Y.
    et al.
    Chen, J.
    Donges, Jonathan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Germany.
    Global terrestrial water storage connectivity revealed using complex climate network analyses2015In: Nonlinear processes in geophysics, ISSN 1023-5809, E-ISSN 1607-7946, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 433-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Terrestrial water storage (TWS) exerts a key control in global water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. Although certain causal relationship exists between precipitation and TWS, the latter quantity also reflects impacts of anthropogenic activities. Thus, quantification of the spatial patterns of TWS will not only help to understand feed-backs between climate dynamics and the hydrologic cycle, but also provide new insights and model calibration constraints for improving the current land surface models. This work is the first attempt to quantify the spatial connectivity of TWS using the complex network theory, which has received broad attention in the climate modeling community in recent years. Complex networks of TWS anomalies are built using two global TWS data sets, a remote sensing product that is obtained from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission, and a model-generated data set from the global land data assimilation system's NOAH model (GLDAS-NOAH). Both data sets have 1 degrees x 1 degrees grid resolutions and cover most global land areas except for permafrost regions. TWS networks are built by first quantifying pairwise correlation among all valid TWS anomaly time series, and then applying a cutoff threshold derived from the edge-density function to retain only the most important features in the network. Basinwise network connectivity maps are used to illuminate connectivity of individual river basins with other regions. The constructed network degree centrality maps show the TWS anomaly hotspots around the globe and the patterns are consistent with recent GRACE studies. Parallel analyses of networks constructed using the two data sets reveal that the GLDAS-NOAH model captures many of the spatial patterns shown by GRACE, although significant discrepancies exist in some regions. Thus, our results provide further measures for constraining the current land surface models, especially in data sparse regions.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf