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  • 1.
    Amann, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Degerman, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Lee, Ming-Tao
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Alexander, John D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Shipilin, Mikhail
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Wang, Hsin-Yi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cavalca, Filippo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Weston, Matthew
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gladh, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blom, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Björkhage, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Löfgren, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schlueter, Christoph
    Loemker, Patrick
    Ederer, Katrin
    Drube, Wolfgang
    Noei, Heshmat
    Zehetner, Johann
    Wentzel, Henrik
    Ahlund, John
    Nilsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy instrument for studies of industrially relevant catalytic reactions at pressures of several bars2019In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 90, no 10, article id 103102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a new high-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy system dedicated to probing catalytic reactions under realistic conditions at pressures of multiple bars. The instrument builds around the novel concept of a virtual cell in which a gas flow onto the sample surface creates a localized high-pressure pillow. This allows the instrument to be operated with a low pressure of a few millibar in the main chamber, while simultaneously a local pressure exceeding 1 bar can be supplied at the sample surface. Synchrotron based hard x-ray excitation is used to increase the electron mean free path in the gas region between sample and analyzer while grazing incidence <5 degrees close to total external refection conditions enhances surface sensitivity. The aperture separating the high-pressure region from the differential pumping of the electron spectrometer consists of multiple, evenly spaced, micrometer sized holes matching the footprint of the x-ray beam on the sample. The resulting signal is highly dependent on the sample-to-aperture distance because photoemitted electrons are subject to strong scattering in the gas phase. Therefore, high precision control of the sample-to-aperture distance is crucial. A fully integrated manipulator allows for sample movement with step sizes of 10 nm between 0 and -5 mm with very low vibrational amplitude and also for sample heating up to 500 degrees C under reaction conditions. We demonstrate the performance of this novel instrument with bulk 2p spectra of a copper single crystal at He pressures of up to 2.5 bars and C1s spectra measured in gas mixtures of CO + H-2 at pressures of up to 790 mbar. The capability to detect emitted photoelectrons at several bars opens the prospect for studies of catalytic reactions under industrially relevant operando conditions.

  • 2. Amole, C.
    et al.
    Ashkezari, M. D.
    Baquero-Ruiz, M.
    Bertsche, W.
    Butler, E.
    Capra, A.
    Cesar, C. L.
    Chapman, S.
    Charlton, M.
    Eriksson, S.
    Fajans, J.
    Friesen, T.
    Fujiwara, M. C.
    Gill, D. R.
    Gutierrez, A.
    Hangst, J. S.
    Hardy, W. N.
    Hayden, M. E.
    Isaac, C. A.
    Jonsell, Svante
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kurchaninov, L.
    Little, A.
    Madsen, N.
    McKenna, J. T. K.
    Menary, S.
    Napoli, S. C.
    Nolan, P.
    Olchanski, K.
    Olin, A.
    Povilus, A.
    Pusa, P.
    Rasmussen, C. O.
    Robicheaux, F.
    Sarid, E.
    Silveira, D. M.
    Stracka, S.
    So, C.
    Thompson, R. I.
    Turner, M.
    van der Werf, D. P.
    Wurtele, J. S.
    Zhmoginov, A.
    Autoresonant-spectrometric determination of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus2013In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 84, no 6, p. 065110-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Knowledge of the residual gas composition in the ALPHA experiment apparatus is important in our studies of antihydrogen and nonneutral plasmas. A technique based on autoresonant ion extraction from an electrostatic potential well has been developed that enables the study of the vacuum in our trap. Computer simulations allow an interpretation of our measurements and provide the residual gas composition under operating conditions typical of those used in experiments to produce, trap, and study antihydrogen. The methods developed may also be applicable in a range of atomic and molecular trap experiments where Penning-Malmberg traps are used and where access is limited.

  • 3.
    Azzouz, Hatim
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands.
    Heeres, Reinier W.
    Dorenbos, Sander N.
    Schouten, Raymond N.
    Zwiller, Valery
    Capacitive readout and gating of superconducting single photon detectors2013In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 84, no 5, article id 053108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose and develop a readout scheme for superconducting single-photon detectors based on an integrated circuit, relaxing the need for large bandwidth amplification and resulting in voltage steps proportional to the number of detected photons. We also demonstrate time gating, to filter scattered light in time and reduce dark counts. This could lead to a higher signal-to-noise ratio. The gate pulse is generated on the detection of a photon created by a spontaneous parametric down-conversion source, heralding the presence of a second photon. These two schemes could find applications within advanced multi-array imaging detection systems.

  • 4. Bernard, J.
    et al.
    Montagne, G.
    Bredy, R.
    Terpend-Ordaciere, B.
    Bourgey, A.
    Kerleroux, M.
    Chen, L.
    Schmidt, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cederquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Martin, S.
    A ""tabletop"" electrostatic ion storage ring: Mini-Ring2008In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 79, no 7, p. 75109-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the design, construction, and commissioning of a novel electrostatic ion storage ring of small dimensions-in the following referred to as ""Mini-Ring."" Mini-Ring consists of four horizontal parallel-plate deflectors and two conical electrostatic mirrors. Ions are injected through the two deflectors on the injection side and off axis with respect to the conical mirrors which face each other. The first injection deflector, originally at zero voltage, is switched to its set value such that the ions after one turn follow stable trajectories of lengths of roughly 30 cm. This design reduces the number of electrodes necessary to guide the ion beam through the ring in stable orbits. The six elements (deflectors and mirrors) are placed on a common grounded plate-the tabletop. Here, we present the design, ion trajectory simulations, and results of the first test experiments demonstrating the successful room-temperature operation of Mini-Ring at background pressures of 10(-6)-10(-7) mbar.

  • 5.
    Bonetti, Stefano
    et al.
    Stanford University, USA; SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, USA.
    Kukreja, Roopali
    Chen, Zhao
    Spoddig, Detlef
    Ollefs, Katharina
    Schöppner, Christian
    Meckenstock, Ralf
    Ney, Andreas
    Pinto, Jude
    Houanche, Richard
    Frisch, Josef
    Stöhr, Joachim
    Dürr, Hermann A.
    Ohldag, Hendrik
    Microwave soft x-ray microscopy for nanoscale magnetization dynamics in the 5-10 GHz frequency range2015In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 86, no 9, article id 093703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a scanning transmission x-ray microscopy setup combined with a novel microwave synchronization scheme for studying high frequency magnetization dynamics at synchrotron light sources. The sensitivity necessary to detect small changes in the magnetization on short time scales and nanometer spatial dimensions is achieved by combining the excitation mechanism with single photon counting electronics that is locked to the synchrotron operation frequency. Our instrument is capable of creating direct images of dynamical phenomena in the 5-10 GHz range, with high spatial resolution. When used together with circularly polarized x-rays, the above capabilities can be combined to study magnetic phenomena at microwave frequencies, such as ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) and spin waves. We demonstrate the capabilities of our technique by presenting phase resolved images of a ∼6 GHz nanoscale spin wave generated by a spin torque oscillator, as well as the uniform ferromagnetic precession with ∼0.1° amplitude at ∼9 GHz in a micrometer-sized cobalt strip.

  • 6.
    Chartkunchand, Kiattichart C.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Stockett, Mark H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Anderson, Emma K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Eklund, Gustav
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kristiansson, Moa K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Kamińska, Magdalena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Jan Kochanowski University, Poland.
    de Ruette, Nathalie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blom, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Björkhage, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Källberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Löfgren, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Reinhed, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rosén, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Simonsson, Ansgar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Zettergren, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schmidt, Henning T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cederquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Dianion diagnostics in DESIREE: High-sensitivity detection of C-n(2-) from a sputter ion source2018In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 89, no 3, article id 033112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A sputter ion source with a solid graphite target has been used to produce dianions with a focus on carbon cluster dianions, C-n(2-), with n = 7-24. Singly and doubly charged anions from the source were accelerated together to kinetic energies of 10 keV per atomic unit of charge and injected into one of the cryogenic (13 K) ion-beam storage rings of the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring Experiment facility at Stockholm University. Spontaneous decay of internally hot C-n(2-) dianions injected into the ring yielded C-n(2-) anions with kinetic energies of 20 keV, which were counted with a microchannel plate detector. Mass spectra produced by scanning the magnetic field of a 90 degrees analyzing magnet on the ion injection line reflect the production of internally hot C-7(2-) - C-24(2-) dianions with lifetimes in the range of tens of microseconds to milliseconds. In spite of the high sensitivity of this method, no conclusive evidence of C-6(2-) was found while there was a clear C-7(2-) signal with the expected isotopic distribution. This is consistent with earlier experimental studies and with theoretical predictions. An upper limit is deduced for a C-6(2-) signal that is two orders-of-magnitude smaller than that for C-7(2-). In addition, CnO2- and CnCu2- dianions were detected.

  • 7.
    Davidson, Ian A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. KTH, Sweden.
    Azzouz, Hatim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. ASML, Netherlands.
    Hueck, Klaus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Universität Hamburg, Germany.
    Bourennane, Mohamed
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A highly versatile optical fibre vacuum feed-through2016In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 87, no 5, article id 053104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coupling light into a vacuum system is a non-trivial problem, requiring the use of a specialized feed-through. This feed-through must be both leak tight and offer a low optical loss if it is to be suitable for general use. In this paper, we report on the development of an extremely simple yet versatile, low cost, demountable optical fiber vacuum feed-through based on the modification of a standard optical fiber bulkhead connector. The modified connector was found to have a leak rate of 6.6 +/- 2.1 x 10(-6) mbar l/s and an optical loss of -0.41 +/- 0.28 dB, making it suitable for use in high vacuum applications.

  • 8.
    de Ruette, Nathalie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Wolf, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Giacomozzi, Linda
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Alexander, John D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gatchell, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Universität Innsbruck, Austria.
    Stockett, Mark H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Haag, Nicole
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Zettergren, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schmidt, Henning T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cederquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    DESIREE electrospray ion source test bench and setup for collision induced dissociation experiments2018In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 89, no 7, article id 075102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we give a detailed description of an electrospray ion source test bench and a single-pass setup for ion fragmentation studies at the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment infrastructure at Stockholm University. This arrangement allows for collision-induced dissociation experiments at the center-of-mass energies between 10 eV and 1 keV. Charged fragments are analyzed with respect to their kinetic energies (masses) by means of an electrostatic energy analyzer with a wide angular acceptance and adjustable energy resolution.

  • 9. Heidenreich, N.
    et al.
    Rütt, U.
    Köppen, M.
    Inge, Andrew Kentaro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Beier, S.
    Dippel, A. -C.
    Suren, R.
    Stock, N.
    A multi-purpose reaction cell for the investigation of reactions under solvothermal conditions2017In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 88, no 10, article id 104102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A new versatile and easy-to-use remote-controlled reactor setup aimed at the analysis of chemical reactions under solvothermal conditions has been constructed. The reactor includes a heating system that can precisely control the temperature inside the reaction vessels in a range between ambient temperature and 180 degrees C. As reaction vessels, two sizes of commercially available borosilicate vessels (V-max = 5 and 11 ml) can be used. The setup furthermore includes the option of stirring and injecting of up to two liquid additives or one solid during the reaction to initiate very fast reactions, quench reactions, or alter chemical parameters. In addition to a detailed description of the general setup and its functionality, three examples of studies conducted using this setup are presented.

  • 10.
    Mohamed, Tarek
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Beni Suef University, Egypt.
    Andler, Guillermo
    Schuch, Reinhold
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    A linear optical trap with active medium for experiments with high power laser pulses2015In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 86, no 2, article id 23113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A linear optical trap for circulating high power laser pulses and tuning these pulses to high repetition frequency of several tens of MHz has been developed. A ns excimer pumped dye laser pulse has been injected with help of a Wollaston prism and a synchronized Pockels cell into an optical trap formed by two highly reflecting mirrors in a linear configuration. The test was done at lambda = 580 nm, but the optical trap can be used without limitations in a broad band of optical wavelengths (400-700 nm). Power considerations give an increase of the efficiency of the optical trap of about 7 times compared to single passage of the laser pulse through the experimental section. The time structure of the trapped laser pulses can be controlled by changing the distance between the two high reflecting mirrors. The efficiency of the optical trap strongly depends upon optical losses. To compensate the optical losses, an amplifying cell was introduced, and the efficiency was about 60 times higher than that by single passage of the laser pulse through the experimental section. (C) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC.

  • 11. Pfaff, S.
    et al.
    Zhou, J.
    Hejral, U.
    Gustafson, J.
    Shipilin, Mikhail
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Albertin, S.
    Blomberg, S.
    Gutowski, O.
    Dippel, A.
    Lundgren, E.
    Zetterberg, J.
    Combining high-energy X-ray diffraction with Surface Optical Reflectance and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence for operando catalyst surface characterization2019In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 90, no 3, article id 033703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have combined three techniques, High Energy Surface X-Ray Diffraction (HESXRD), Surface Optical Reflectance, and Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence in an operando study of CO oxidation over a Pd(100) catalyst. We show that these techniques provide useful new insights such as the ability to verify that the finite region being probed by techniques such as HESXRD is representative of the sample surface as a whole. The combination is also suitable to determine when changes in gas composition or surface structure and/or morphology occur and to subsequently correlate them with high temporal resolution. In the study, we confirm previous results which show that the Pd(100) surface reaches high activity before an oxide can be detected. Furthermore, we show that the single crystal catalyst surface does not behave homogeneously, which we attribute to the surface being exposed to inhomogeneous gas conditions in mass transfer limited scenarios.

  • 12. Plogmaker, Stefan
    et al.
    Linusson, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Eland, John H. D.
    Baker, Neville
    Johansson, Erik M. J.
    Rensmo, Håkan
    Feifel, Raimund
    Siegbahn, Hans
    Versatile high-repetition-rate phase-locked chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum ultraviolet and x-ray spectral region2012In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 013115-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel light chopper system for fast timing experiments in the vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) and x-ray spectral region has been developed. It can be phase-locked and synchronized with a synchrotron radiation storage ring, accommodating repetition rates in the range of similar to 8 to similar to 120 kHz by choosing different sets of apertures and subharmonics of the ring frequency (MHz range). Also the opening time of the system can be varied from some nanoseconds to several microseconds to meet the needs of a broad range of applications. Adjusting these parameters, the device can be used either for the generation of single light pulses or pulse packages from a microwave driven, continuous He gas discharge lamp or from storage rings which are otherwise often considered as quasi-continuous light sources. This chopper can be utilized for many different kinds of experiments enabling, for example, unambiguous time-of-flight (TOF) multi-electron coincidence studies of atoms and molecules excited by a single light pulse as well as time-resolved visible laser pump x-ray probe electron spectroscopy of condensed matter in the valence and core level region.

  • 13.
    Rosén, Stefan
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schmidt, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Reinhed, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Fischer, Daniel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Thomas, Richard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cederquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Liljeby, Leif
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Manne Siegbahn Laboratory .
    Bagge, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Manne Siegbahn Laboratory .
    Leontein, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Manne Siegbahn Laboratory .
    Blom, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, The Manne Siegbahn Laboratory .
    Operating a triple stack microchannel plate-phosphor assembly for single particle counting in the 12-300 K temperature range2007In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 78, no 11, p. 113301-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An assembly consisting of a stack of three microchannel plates (MCPs) and a phosphor screen anode has been operated over the temperature range from 300 to 12 K. We report on measurements at 6.4 kHz (using an alpha source) and with dark counts only (15 Hz). Without any particle source,  the MCP bias current decreased by a factor of 2.1×103 when the temperature was lowered from 300 to 12 K. Using the alpha source, and a photomultiplier tube (PMT) to monitor the phosphor screen anode, we first observed an increase in the decay time of the phosphor from 12 to 45 μs when the temperature was decreased from 300 to 100 K while the decay time then decreased and reached a value of 5 μs at 12 K. The pulse height distribution from the PMT was measured between300 and 12 K and shows a spectrum typical for a MCP phosphor setup at 300 K and 12 K but is strongly degraded for intermediate temperatures. We conclude that the present MCP-phosphor detector assembly is well suited for position-sensitive particle counting operation at temperatures down to at least 12 K even for count rates beyond 6 kHz. This result is crucial and an important part of ongoing developments of new instrumentation for investigations of, e.g., interactions involving complex molecular ions with internal quantum state control.

  • 14.
    Schmidt, Henning T.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Thomas, Richard D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Gatchell, Michael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rosén, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Reinhed, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Löfgren, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Brännholm, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blom, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Björkhage, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bäckström, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Alexander, John D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Leontein, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hanstorp, D.
    Zettergren, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Liljeby, Leif
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Källberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Simonsson, Ansgar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hellberg, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mannervik, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Larsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Geppert, Wolf D.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rensfelt, Karl-Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Danared, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Paal, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Masuda, Masaharu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hallden, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Andler, Guillermo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Stockett, Mark H.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Chen, Tao
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Källersjö, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Weimer, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hansen, K.
    Hartman, H.
    Cederquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    First storage of ion beams in the Double Electrostatic Ion-Ring Experiment: DESIREE2013In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 84, no 5, p. 055115-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report on the first storage of ion beams in the Double ElectroStatic Ion Ring ExpEriment, DESIREE, at Stockholm University. We have produced beams of atomic carbon anions and small carbon anion molecules (C-n(-), n = 1, 2, 3, 4) in a sputter ion source. The ion beams were accelerated to 10 keV kinetic energy and stored in an electrostatic ion storage ring enclosed in a vacuum chamber at 13 K. For 10 keV C-2(-) molecular anions we measure the residual-gas limited beam storage lifetime to be 448 s +/- 18 s with two independent detector systems. Using the measured storage lifetimes we estimate that the residual gas pressure is in the 10(-14) mbar range. When high current ion beams are injected, the number of stored particles does not follow a single exponential decay law as would be expected for stored particles lost solely due to electron detachment in collision with the residual-gas. Instead, we observe a faster initial decay rate, which we ascribe to the effect of the space charge of the ion beam on the storage capacity.

  • 15.
    Tagliati, Stella
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Krasnov, Vladimir M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rydh, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Differential membrane-based nanocalorimeter for high-resolution measurements of low-temperature specific heat2012In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 83, no 5, p. 055107-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A differential, membrane-based nanocalorimeter for general specific heat studies of very small samples, ranging from 0.5 mg to sub-mu g in mass, is described. The calorimeter operates over the temperature range from above room temperature down to 0.5 K. It consists of a pair of cells, each of which is a stack of heaters and thermometer in the center of a silicon nitride membrane, in total giving a background heat capacity less than 100 nJ/K at 300 K, decreasing to 10 pJ/K at 1 K. The device has several distinctive features: (i) The resistive thermometer, made of a Ge1-xAux alloy, displays a high dimensionless sensitivity |dlnR/dlnT| greater than or similar to 1 over the entire temperature range. (ii) The sample is placed in direct contact with the thermometer, which is allowed to self-heat. The thermometer can thus be operated at high dc current to increase the resolution. (iii) Data are acquired with a set of eight synchronized lock-in amplifiers measuring dc, 1st and 2nd harmonic signals of heaters and thermometer. This gives high resolution and allows continuous output adjustments without additional noise. (iv) Absolute accuracy is achieved via a variable-frequency-fixed-phase technique in which the measurement frequency is automatically adjusted during the measurements to account for the temperature variation of the sample heat capacity and the device thermal conductance. The performance of the calorimeter is illustrated by studying the heat capacity of a small Au sample and the specific heat of a 2.6 mu g piece of superconducting Pb in various magnetic fields.

  • 16.
    Thomas, Richard D.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schmidt, Henning T.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Andler, Guillermo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Björkhage, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Blom, Mikael
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Brännholm, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Bäckstrom, Erik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Danared, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Das, Susanta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Haag, Nicole
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Halldén, Per
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Hellberg, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Holm, Anne I. S.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Johansson, H. A. B.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Källberg, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Källersjö, Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Larsson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Leontein, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Liljeby, Leif
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Löfgren, Patrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Malm, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Mannervik, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Masuda, Masaharu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Misra, Deepankar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Orban, A.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Paál, Andras
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Reinhed, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rensfelt, Karl-Gunnar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Rosén, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Schmidt, K.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Seitz, Fabian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Simonsson, Ansgar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Weimer, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Zettergren, Henning
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Cederquist, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    The double electrostatic ion ring experiment: A unique cryogenic electrostatic storage ring for merged ion-beams studies2011In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 82, no 6, p. 065112-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We describe the design of a novel type of storage device currently under construction at Stockholm University, Sweden, using purely electrostatic focussing and deflection elements, in which ion beams of opposite charges are confined under extreme high vacuum cryogenic conditions in separate rings and merged over a common straight section. The construction of this double electrostatic ion ring experiment uniquely allows for studies of interactions between cations and anions at low and well-defined internal temperatures and centre-of-mass collision energies down to about 10 K and 10 meV, respectively. Position sensitive multi-hit detector systems have been extensively tested and proven to work in cryogenic environments and these will be used to measure correlations between reaction products in, for example, electron-transfer processes. The technical advantages of using purely electrostatic ion storage devices over magnetic ones are many, but the most relevant are: electrostatic elements which are more compact and easier to construct; remanent fields, hysteresis, and eddy-currents, which are of concern in magnetic devices, are no longer relevant; and electrical fields required to control the orbit of the ions are not only much easier to create and control than the corresponding magnetic fields, they also set no upper mass limit on the ions that can be stored. These technical differences are a boon to new areas of fundamental experimental research, not only in atomic and molecular physics but also in the boundaries of these fields with chemistry and biology. For examples, studies of interactions with internally cold molecular ions will be particular useful for applications in astrophysics, while studies of solvated ionic clusters will be of relevance to aeronomy and biology.

  • 17. Willa, K.
    et al.
    Diao, Zhu
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics. Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Campanini, Donato
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Welp, U.
    Divan, R.
    Hudl, Matthias
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Islam, Z.
    Kwok, W. -K.
    Rydh, Andreas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Nanocalorimeter platform for in situ specific heat measurements and x-ray diffraction at low temperature2017In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 88, no 12, article id 125108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in electronics and nanofabrication have enabled membrane-based nanocalorimetry for measurements of the specific heat of microgram-sized samples. We have integrated a nanocalorimeter platform into a 4.5 T split-pair vertical-field magnet to allow for the simultaneous measurement of the specific heat and x-ray scattering in magnetic fields and at temperatures as low as 4 K. This multi-modal approach empowers researchers to directly correlate scattering experiments with insights from thermodynamic properties including structural, electronic, orbital, and magnetic phase transitions. The use of a nanocalorimeter sample platform enables numerous technical advantages: precise measurement and control of the sample temperature, quantification of beam heating effects, fast and precise positioning of the sample in the x-ray beam, and fast acquisition of x-ray scans over a wide temperature range without the need for time-consuming re-centering and re-alignment. Furthermore, on an YBa2Cu3O7-delta crystal and a copper foil, we demonstrate a novel approach to x-ray absorption spectroscopy by monitoring the change in sample temperature as a function of incident photon energy. Finally, we illustrate the new insights that can be gained from in situ structural and thermodynamic measurements by investigating the superheated state occurring at the first-order magneto-elastic phase transition of Fe2P, a material that is of interest for magnetocaloric applications.

  • 18. Xiao, J.
    et al.
    Fei, Z.
    Yang, Y.
    Jin, X.
    Lu, D.
    Shen, Y.
    Liljeby, Leif
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, The Manne Siegbahn Laboratory.
    Hutton, R.
    Zou, Y.
    A very low energy compact electron beam ion trap for spectroscopic research in Shanghai2012In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 83, no 1, p. 013303-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, a new compact low energy electron beam ion trap, SH-PermEBIT, is reported. This electron beam ion trap (EBIT) can operate in the electron energy range of 60-5000 eV, with a current density of up to 100 A/cm(2). The low energy limit of this machine sets the record among the reported works so far. The magnetic field in the central drift tube region of this EBIT is around 0.5 T, produced by permanent magnets and soft iron. The design of this EBIT allows adjustment of the electron gun's axial position in the fringe field of the central magnetic field. This turned out to be very important for optimizing the magnetic field in the region of the electron gun and particularly important for low electron beam energy operation, since the magnetic field strength is not tunable with permanent magnets. In this work, transmission of the electron beam as well as the upper limit of the electron beam width under several conditions are measured. Spectral results from test operation of this EBIT at the electron energies of 60, 315, 2800, and 4100 eV are also reported.

  • 19.
    Zhaunerchyk, Vitali
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics.
    Abel transform analysis of ion storage ring imaging data2010In: Review of Scientific Instruments, ISSN 0034-6748, E-ISSN 1089-7623, Vol. 81, no 5, p. 53108-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper a new approach to analyze dissociative recombination product distance distributions measured at ion storage rings is presented. This approach is based on an Abel transform and the validity is demonstrated for the imaging data obtained from the CRYRING experiments on the dissociative recombination of H-2(+) and CO+. The reported method is generally valid for the data analysis of high resolution merged beams experiments such as DESIREE where isotropic fragment distributions can be expected.

1 - 19 of 19
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