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  • 1. Blythe, Jessica
    et al.
    Silver, Jennifer
    Evans, Louisa
    Armitage, Derek
    Bennett, Nathan J.
    Moore, Michele-Lee
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm Resilience Centre. University of Victoria, Canada.
    Morrison, Tiffany H.
    Brown, Katrina
    The Dark Side of Transformation: Latent Risks in Contemporary Sustainability Discourse2018In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 1206-1223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The notion of transformation is gaining traction in contemporary sustainability debates. New ways of theorising and supporting transformations are emerging and, so the argument goes, opening exciting spaces to (re)imagine and (re)structure radically different futures. Yet, questions remain about how the term is being translated from an academic concept into an assemblage of normative policies and practices, and how this process might shape social, political, and environmental change. Motivated by these questions, we identify five latent risks associated with discourse that frames transformation as apolitical and/or inevitable. We refer to these risks as the dark side of transformation. While we cannot predict the future of radical transformations towards sustainability, we suggest that scientists, policymakers, and practitioners need to consider such change in more inherently plural and political ways.

  • 2.
    Ince, Anthony
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Featherstone, David
    Cumbers, Andrew
    Mackinnon, Danny
    Strauss, Kendra
    British Jobs for British Workers? Negotiating Work, Nation, and Globalisation through the Lindsey Oil Refinery Disputes2015In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 139-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the relationships between labour organising, globalisation and national identity through an engagement with the 2009 Lindsey Oil Refinery strikes. Some strikers adopted the controversial slogan ‘British Jobs for British Workers’ in response to employers’ attempts to undercut existing wages and conditions with a new migrant workforce. This led to accusations of xenophobia. We make three inter-related arguments. First, we contend that it is necessary to interrogate the spatialised power relations generated through particular forms of labour agency enacted in relation to globalising processes. Second, since these responses can be politically ambiguous, success in territorially based disputes does not always equate with broader (transnational) class agency. Third, relevant to the project of labour geography, we propose that labour scholars and activists be more attuned to the mundane ambiguities in labour agency, and the subsequent need to frame local action within a broader relational politics of global labour solidarity.

  • 3.
    Velasquez, Juan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    Barrio women's invited and invented spaces against urban elitisation in Chacao, Venezuela2014In: Antipode, ISSN 0066-4812, E-ISSN 1467-8330, Vol. 46, no 3, p. 835-856Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Outright victories against urban elitisation are rare in the current urban revolution. This article highlights how urban elitisation is confronted in Chacao, the most elite and urban part of Venezuela. Initially it reviews how this urban elitisation created the main economic, political and military strongholds of the opposition to the Bolivarian revolution. Then, in contesting it, the urban and Bolivarian revolutions feed each other through women's participation in invited and invented spaces of citizenship. From such spaces, Chacao women in their settler's movement organised struggles of insurgent citizenship to stop elitist urban renewal agendas and develop further forms of insurgent urbanism to conduct an urban renewal from below and establish a New Socialist Community for 600 families. They emerged as a revolutionary class to implement Bolivarian policies addressing the inefficiency and opportunism of the bureaucratic state and contesting urban elitisation with an anti-capitalist and anti-imperialist insurgent urbanism.

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