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  • 1.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    et al.
    University of New South Wales.
    Robinson, Daniel F.
    Care-work on fieldwork: taking your own children into the field2015In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 372-378Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Eriksson, Christine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    The art of displacement: – curating a preschool context in a public transport system2019In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses ways of enabling the youngest children at preschool (1–3 years) to participate in creating space in the public transport system. One researcher, two preschool educators and six preschool toddlers travelled on foot, by bus and by underground train to the Brunkeberg tunnel, a pedestrian tunnel in the centre of Stockholm, Sweden. Drawing on artistic site-specific methods of displacement, this article details three propositions for how to ‘do’ preschool in the public transport system: locations, dimensions and positions. By placing the routines and rhythms of a preschool practice into the urban spaces of transport, the ‘miniature preschool’ comes to curate context. The article proposes methods for a preschool practice to curate context through activating mobile but particular locations within a specific place; creating a vocal mobile architecture; and enabling multiple and mobile positions within one specific situation.

  • 3. Evans, Ruth
    et al.
    Bowlby, Sophie
    Gottzén, Lucas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Ribbens McCarthy, Jane
    Unpacking ‘family troubles’, care and relationality across time and space2019In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 501-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite significant work on family geographies in recent years, geographers have paid less attention to changes and challenges that may be considered 'family troubles' in diverse contexts. Through this editorial and the special section, we unpack time-space dynamics of ‘family troubles’ in diverse contexts, with a particular focus on care and relationality. Our discussion foregrounds ambiguities and tensions surrounding geographical proximity and propinguity, material-emotional responses, and diverse meanings of ‘family’, ‘home’ and belonging in the context of troubling changes in family lives, intergenerational relations and practices of care. We seek to establish an agenda for future geographical work and interdisciplinary dialogue on ‘family troubles’, vulnerabilities and social suffering in contexts of (troubling) changes and diversity. Such analyses are crucial in our efforts to envision a more relational understanding of our ‘being-in-the-world’, underpinned by care ethics and support for differentially positioned family members throughout the lifecourse and across generations.

  • 4.
    Gottzén, Lucas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Sandberg, Linn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Creating safe atmospheres? Children’s experiences of grandparents’ affective and spatial responses to domestic violence2019In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 514-526Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While grandparenting literature has primarily discussed intergenerational relations in families with ‘normal’ everyday problems, such as childcare, it has largely neglected more troublesome issues, such as domestic violence. Based on interviews with ten children and teens, this article explores grandchildren’s experiences of how their grandparents have responded when they were being exposed to violence in the intermediate generation. These responses have affective-spatial aspects as the grandparents contributed to what we call ‘safe atmospheres’. Grandparents’ homes often provided a sense of safety, and grandparents at times contributed to a safe atmosphere in their grandchildren’s homes and helped to create safety and comfort in non-domestic places. Some grandparents, however, could be unsupportive and fail to contribute to safe atmospheres. Although physical space is important to create safety, in order to create a safe atmosphere, it has to correspond to a relational movement where grandparents side with their grandchildren. 

  • 5.
    Karlsson, Sandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    ‘You said “home” but we don’t have a house’ – children’s lived rights and politics in an asylum centre in Sweden2019In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 64-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores children’s lived rights and articulated politics in the context of housing underpinned by their lived experiences in an asylum centre in Sweden. The findings reveal a discrepancy between the children’s articulated standpoints, where well-being is connected to having a home, and their lived experiences of lacking conditions for both house and home at the asylum centre. This discrepancy enables demonstration of the children’s articulated politics, as they criticize conditions, practices and relational aspects they experience as constraining their well-being at the asylum centre. Thereby, the children themselves identify the structural denial of their right to conditions for well-being and adequate housing. They also express what conditions for well-being should be accessible to them, which is interpreted here as their making rights claims when their formal rights are not fulfilled.

  • 6.
    Ottosson, Lisa
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eastmond, Marita
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Assertions and aspirations: agency among accompanied asylum-seeking children in Sweden2017In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 426-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on asylum-seeking children tends to disregard those in parental care. In particular, little is known about children’s own perspectives. Based on ethnographic fieldwork in Sweden, this article explores the ways in which accompanied children experience and seek to overcome challenges posed by asylum reception. The focus is on children’s ambition and ability to form their everyday life, given their ambiguous position of tentative emplacement. Theoretical inspiration is sought in Ortner’s ‘agency of personal projects’ and de Certeau’s concept of ‘tactics’, analysed through the prism of liminality. The study found that while some tactics aimed at avoiding situations and settings that made children uncomfortable, others involved influencing their situation through pursuing ‘personal projects’. Many children’s strivings were directed at creating ‘a normal life’ and a place for themselves in Swedish society. The findings challenge the idea that accompanied children are more protected from difficulties and responsibilities than those seeking asylum alone.

  • 7.
    Skoglund, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stockholm Business School.
    Börjesson, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Mobilizing ‘juvenocratic spaces’ by the biopoliticization of children through sustainability2014In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 429-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Northern children have been increasingly referred to as competent, participative and influential, called on to protect and produce certain life at times of climate risks. Child–adult relations and the required transition to adulthood are thus transformed by a re-configured ‘biopolitics’. We trace how various collaborative actors invite children to foster life at an aggregate level and illustrate how different age categories are governed at a distance. The results show that pedagogic expertise, in conjunction with sustainability, is mobilized in and by ‘juvenocratic spaces’, where youths are obliged to foster sustainable consumption and ways of living beyond territorial borders.

  • 8. Svensson, Malin
    et al.
    Ekblad, Solvig
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute.
    Ascher, Henry
    Making meaningful space for oneself: photo-based dialogue with siblings of refugee children with severe withdrawal symptoms2009In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 209-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The current study explores the use of children's photographs to establish a dialogue about everyday life with healthy siblings of refugee children with severe withdrawal symptoms (SWS). Asylum-seeking refugee children in Sweden with SWS have been officially observed since 2000, yet research has overlooked their healthy siblings. We studied three healthy siblings and found photography to be an applicable communicative tool. When parents focus their attention on the ill child, the healthy children create space for themselves and indicate both resilience and vulnerability. We suggest that, together with a dialogue, children's own photographs are useful for research with refugee children in vulnerable situations.

     

  • 9.
    Änggård, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Digital cameras: agents in research with children2015In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a study on children’s relations to outdoor places, 41 6- to 8-year-old children took photos with digital cameras during walks in schoolyards and nature environments. In the present article, the cameras and their role in the research process are in focus. A materialist approach has guided the analysis (Barad 2003, 2007). The research process is seen as a materialist-discursive phenomenon in which several human and nonhuman agents intra-act. The results indicate that the cameras give rise to explorative activities and function as a third party in social situations. These activities occasionally counteract the purpose of the study.

  • 10.
    Änggård, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    How matter comes to matter in children's nature play: posthumanist approaches and children's geographies2016In: Children's Geographies, ISSN 1473-3285, E-ISSN 1473-3277, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 77-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present paper, a posthumanist approach is used to analyse children's play activities in natural environments. The aim is to analyse intra-actions between children, the material environment and discourses, with a focus on the material and embodied aspects of these intra-actions. Forty-two children between six and eight years and from two Swedish schools participated in the study. Video observations of play activities have been the most important data source. For the analysis of how matter acts', play with sensorimotor content has been distinguished from play with symbolic content. In sensorimotor play, matter seems to talk' more directly to children's hands and bodies. In play activities with symbolic content, matter works both directly and through discourses, when objects are given symbolic meaning. In both kinds of play, discursive practices in the peer groups are influential.

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