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  • 1.
    Balogh, Péter
    Södertörn University, Centre for Baltic and East European Studies.
    Sleeping abroad but working at home: Cross-border residential mobility between transnationalism and (re)bordering2013In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 95, no 2, p. 189-204Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cross-border residential mobility (CBRM) has so far largely been approached from a transnational perspective. However, recent developments in border studies and transnationalism give rise to certain doubts. While border studies have come to include mental borders next to physical borderlands, transnationalism today refers not just to cross-border movements but also to identities trans-cending the national. But border studies have shown that the increased crossing of borders is not necessarily coupled with their diminished significance. CBRM is a particularly interesting phenomenon as it entails the continuous crossing of a physical border, but the question is whether it also implies the erosion of mental borders and the emergence of transnational ties. While drawing on experiences from parallel cases, my study focuses on Poles from Szczecin moving just across the boundary to Vorpommern, Germany. Some are integrating there, but their large majority appears to carry on with everyday life in Poland as before moving. This settlement has triggered considerable resentment among local Germans, who as a reaction mark the borderland discursively and physically. As my survey shows, while both groups regularly cross the physical border, many even among the cross-border residents consider it as a necessary dividing line or prefer cooperation to be reserved to some activities. Hence, unlike longdistance migration leading either to diaspora identities or to gradual dissolution in the majority culture, CBRM appears as a specific form of international migration where the physical proximity allows such intensive links with the country of origin that transnational effects are mitigated.

  • 2.
    Dessie, Gessesse
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Physical Geography and Quaternary Geology.
    Kinlund, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Khat expansion and forest decline in Wondo Genet, Ethiopia2008In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 90, no 2, p. 187-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study analyses the expansion of khat productionin relation to forest decline in the Wondo Genet area in southcentralEthiopia. By assessing spatial variables and social factors,and using remote sensing and social survey techniques, the extentto which this new cash crop contributes to deforestation is explored.The results indicate that khat has expanded rapidly in terms ofland area used for its production at forest frontiers, in isolated forestpatches and within farmland since the mid-1980s. This ismainly due to high economic advantage, high market demand andfavourable means of transport as well as the existence of a cohesivetrade network. Moreover, the properties of the crop also facilitateexpansion. The increased production of khat appears to bea result of conscious choice and rational decisions made by malefarmers, regardless of religious, cultural and policy discouragementand despite khat’s possible negative impact on livelihood security.Although it is found that khat expansion does not explain forestdecline in the study area per se, it plays an important role in enhancingmultifaceted interaction between people and forest. Theexpansion influences forest decline directly by conversion, andindirectly through increased human activity in proximity to forests.The conversion has resulted in a reduction of forest area, resilienceand regeneration. Khat production has changed humansettlement patterns, suppressed production of other crops and influencedwomen’s income negatively. These aspects increase thedemand for wood and it renders the forest an important source ofsupplementary incomes. Khat production may create tension, resultingfrom a conflict in interest between sustaining the nativeforests, with subsequent environmental benefits for the larger socialgroup, and the economically driven choice land use made bykhat farmers.

  • 3.
    Forsberg, Gunnel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Stenbacka, Susanne
    Creating and challenging gendered spatialities: how space affects gender contracts2017In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 99, no 3, p. 223-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses the spatial component of gender relations through an analysis of contemporary gender relations in rural Sweden. We use the concept of local gender contracts, analysing their nature and transformation in various contexts. When gendered practices are analysed at local level, negotiations about the gendering of everyday practices become visible. The focus is on analysing the (informal) strategies in such negotiations and how people act and react in relation to them. The results point to two alternative strategies. Women and men either adapt to the mainstream gender contract of the region, and adhere to it regardless of changes in society's demands, or challenge existing norms, practices and representations in their public and/or private lives, according to changes in local conditions. The local context is thus active in reproducing and maintaining, as well as transforming, gender relations and thereby reshaping the gender contract.

  • 4. Vrotsou, Katerina
    et al.
    Andersson, Gunnel
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. FoU Södertörn, Sweden.
    Ellegård, Kajsa
    Stefansson, Claes-Göran
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Topor, Alain
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. University of Agder, Norway.
    Denhov, Anne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bülow, Per
    A time-geographic approach for visualizing the paths of intervention for persons with severe mental illness2017In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 99, no 4, p. 341-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Living conditions for persons with severe mental illness (SMI) in Sweden have changed dramatically in recent decades, mainly due to the closure of mental hospitals in the 1990s and the subsequent development of community-based interventions. Thereby, people with SMI have experienced care interventions in various forms, which vary according to how the treatment is institutionally organised over the years. There is, however, a lack of knowledge concerning what care paths persons with SMI have undergone in this fragmented institutional landscape. In this article we present a time-geography-inspired visualisation method to address this. A set of 437 persons, first diagnosed with psychosis between 2000-2004, were studied over 10 years with regard to their contact with various care institutions. We constructed time-geographic paths of intervention for these individuals and visualised them at an aggregate level. The initial exploration conducted using the proposed visualisation method showed gender and age differences in some respects, but also that the initial periods after the psychosis diagnoses were similar in terms of in-patient care interventions among men and women. The proposed visualisation method is promising and should be further developed for deeper analysis of long-term individual paths of intervention.

  • 5.
    Webster, Natasha A.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Caretta, Martina Angela
    Early-career women in geography. Practical pathways to advancement in the neoliberal university2019In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 1-6Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 6.
    Webster, Natasha
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Boyd, Meighan
    Exploring the importance of inter-departmental women’s friendship in geography as resistance in the neoliberal academy2019In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 44-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Friendship has potential as a key coping and self-care strategy among early career researchers (ECR’s) and has been shown to be crucial to overall well-being and sense of belonging, but its importance as a response to career pressures is not well studied. For ECR’s, friendships within the university are situated in a specific structural and institutional context, and formigrant women, this includes an additional aspect of gendered complexity. At the same time friendships may prove difficult as heightened neoliberal metrics emphasize competition forfunding, positions and teaching requirements. Using autoethnographic intra-reflections on the authors’ own friendship, bridging human geography and physical geography, this paper examines friendship of two ECR women from a homosocial perspective where institutional hierarchies and structures may be somewhat equalized. Drawing on the exploration of the authors’ friendship during their PhD years and into their post-doc positions, we reflect on the importance of friendship as an act of support, self-care and resistance. We argue for heightening importance for examining the way friendship creates safe social spaces and offer new insights into the importance of friendships in career paths. Friendship in the neoliberal academy has transformative potential for creating a culture of well-being in geography.

  • 7.
    Wimark, Thomas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Nielsen, Michael Meinild
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Migrant labor market integration: the association between initial settlement and subsequent employment and income among migrants2019In: Geografiska Annaler. Series B, Human Geography, ISSN 0435-3684, E-ISSN 1468-0467, Vol. 101, no 2, p. 118-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The neighborhood effects literature indicates that a person’s place of residence may affect their socio-economic situation. This study examines the association between initial settlement and immigrants’ employment and income. Previous studies mostly used administratively defined geographical units of study, which may have led to an underestimation of neighborhood effects. The current study uses individualized neighborhoods, where neighborhoods are constructed based on each individual’s closest neighbors using geocoded register data, on different scales. In this way, more of the individual’s actual neighborhood is captured. The longitudinal study follows three cohorts of migrants and examines the relationship between the initial neighborhoods that migrants settle in and their employment and income, in the short and medium-long term. The results show clear associations between neighborhoods of initial settlement and labor market integration. Starting off in neighborhoods with high levels of deprivation is associated with lower levels of employment, while settling in affluent neighborhoods is associated with higher incomes. Findings are stable for different migrant cohorts and in the short and long term. Neighborhood effects are substantial especially for those settling in the most deprived or the most affluent neighborhoods.

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