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  • 1.
    Drozdzewski, Danielle
    University of New South Wales.
    A place called ‘Bielany’: Negotiating a diasporic Polish place in Sydney2007In: Social & cultural geography (Print), ISSN 1464-9365, E-ISSN 1470-1197, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 853-869Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Lagerqvist, Maja
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Book-Review of McGrath. Brendan (2013) Landscape and society in contemporary Ireland.2015In: Social & cultural geography (Print), ISSN 1464-9365, E-ISSN 1470-1197, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 587-588Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Wimark, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Homemaking and perpetual liminality among queer refugees2019In: Social & cultural geography (Print), ISSN 1464-9365, E-ISSN 1470-1197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As people continue to flee repressive regimes, discussions of refugees’ state of liminality have intensified. Refugee camps and detention centres tend to force refugees to endure living in liminality for long periods of time. Taking fleeing as a point of departure, this study suggests a change from the notion of fleeing as movement to a search for home and homemaking. This understanding shifts the analysis away from state-controlled spaces to a wider consideration of spaces of importance for homemaking. Widening the discussion on liminality to homemaking indicates that liminality can be experienced in a variety of spaces. Using material from interviews with queer refugees in the Swedish countryside, I discuss their travels, displacements and homemaking. Their stories show that creating a home is a continuous process delimited by norms in families, ethnic networks, host societies and queer networks. Not adhering to these norms renders homemaking difficult and pushes some queer refugees to liminal spaces. Thus, I suggest an understanding of some queer refugees as constantly rejected and pushed into a perpetual state of liminal homemaking. An analysis that illuminates refugees’ displacements from belonging moves discussions of liminality away from state-controlled spaces and highlights the norms that govern the homemaking process.

  • 4.
    Wimark, Thomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Migration motives of gay men in the new acceptance era: a cohort study from Malmö, Sweden2016In: Social & cultural geography (Print), ISSN 1464-9365, E-ISSN 1470-1197, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 605-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Greater diversity in life courses has become both possible and real in the twenty-first century, affecting the relocation behaviours of individuals. Therefore, it is logical that the relocation patterns of minorities have been receiving increasing attention. In particular, the migration patterns of gay men have been studied, with a focus on the embodied reasons for mobility. This downsized analysis has shown the importance of identity building and identity search. However, this article argues that analysis of migration among gay men also needs to be upsized. This study aims to show how both context and embodiment has affected the mobility of gay men. Through a case study within the context of a strong welfare state (Sweden) that adopted sexual equality early, gay men’s motives for migration are studied. The results suggest that the migration patterns of gay men are becoming more similar to those of the general population. This finding shows that current conceptualisations of the migration patterns of gay men can be advanced by acknowledging contextual effects. The integration of a downsized and an upsized understanding also offers the possibility of moving beyond the identity specifics showing that populations are becoming increasingly diverse and homogeneous simultaneously.

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