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  • 1. van Ham, Maarten
    et al.
    Hedman, Lina
    Manley, David
    Coulter, Rory
    Östh, John
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Intergenerational transmission of neighbourhood poverty: an analysis of neighbourhood histories of individuals2014In: Transactions of the Institute of British Geographers, ISSN 0020-2754, E-ISSN 1475-5661, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 402-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The extent to which socioeconomic (dis) advantage is transmitted between generations is receiving increasing attention from academics and policymakers. However, few studies have investigated whether there is a spatial dimension to this intergenerational transmission of (dis) advantage. Drawing on the concept of neighbourhood biographies, this study contends that there are links between the places individuals live with their parents and their subsequent neighbourhood experiences as independent adults. Using individual-level register data tracking the whole Stockholm population from 1990 to 2008, and bespoke neighbourhoods, this study is the first to use sequencing techniques to construct individual neighbourhood histories. Through visualisation methods and ordered logit models, we demonstrate that the socioeconomic composition of the neighbourhood children lived in before they left the parental home is strongly related to the status of the neighbourhood they live in 5, 12 and 18 years later. Children living with their parents in high poverty concentration neighbourhoods are very likely to end up in similar neighbourhoods much later in life. The parental neighbourhood is also important in predicting the cumulative exposure to poverty concentration neighbourhoods over a long period of early adulthood. Ethnic minorities were found to have the longest cumulative exposure to poverty concentration neighbourhoods. These findings imply that for some groups, disadvantage is both inherited and highly persistent.

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