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  • 1.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Joshi, Somya
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Understanding Limits from a Social-Ecological perspective2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The latest developments in the field of HCI have given rise to an increasing interest in issues pertaining to global warming, resource depletion and environmental degradation. Concern about such issues has contributed to give shape to the design space of sustainable HCI (SHCI); a space whose boundaries are at times blurred. On the one hand, some, design “sustainable” information technology based on visions of the world that do not really question limits to continuous economic growth and, on the other hand, others embrace the design of information technology from stances that acknowledges limits (i.e., economic, ecological, energetic). This paper introduces the perspective of social ecology into SHCI. This perspective provides us with a core set of principles that makes us situate computing at the intersection of physical (natural) and moral (human) qualities of our human environment systems. As such it confronts us with choices to be made in the challenging years to come and invites us to argue about the very purpose of information technology in a world of limitations.

  • 2.
    Cerratto-Pargman, Teresa
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Pargman, Daniel
    Nardi, Bonnie
    The Internet at the eco-village: Performing Sustainability in the twenty-first century2016In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 21, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Is the digital infrastructure and its footprint an ideological blind spot for recently emerging ecological communities, including eco-villages? This paper examines how a group of people who are concerned with environmental issues such as peak oil and climate change are orchestrating a transition toward a more sustainable and resilient way of living. We studied a Swedish eco-village, considering how computing in this community contributes to defining what alternative ways of living might look like in the twenty-first century. Drawing on a social-ecological perspective, the analysis illustrates, on the one hand, that the Internet, along with the digital devices we use to access it, capitalizes and mobilizes values, knowledge and social relationships that in turn enhance resilience in the eco-village. On the other hand, the analysis shows that an explicit focus on ecological values is not sufficient for a community of individuals to significantly transform Internet use to conform to ecological ideals. This work contributes to a deeper understanding of the imbrication of social technologies with practices that are oriented to perform sustainable and resilient ways of living.

  • 3.
    Hansson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Controlling singularity: The role of online communication for young visual artists’ identity management2015In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 20, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper contributes to the literature on art, new media and identity by investigating the role online communication plays for young visual artists’ identity management. Drawing from comprehensive sources on the Internet such as blogs, Web pages, networking sites and digital magazines, as well as interview data from art students at the Royal Institute of Art in Stockholm, this article describes how artists deal with convergent contexts online, while addressing an exclusive public of cultural producers and simultaneously reaching for a broad cultural significance.

  • 4. Schilhab, Theresa
    et al.
    Balling, Gitte
    Kuzmičová, Anežka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Culture and Aesthetics.
    Decreasing materiality from print to screen reading2018In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 23, no 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The shift from print to screen has bodily effects on how we read. We distinguish two dimensions of embodied reading: the spatio-temporal and the imaginary. The former relates to what the body does during the act of reading and the latter relates to the role of the body in the imagined scenarios we create from what we read. At the level of neurons, these two dimensions are related to how we make sense of the world. From this perspective, we explain how the bodily activity of reading changes from print to screen. Our focus is on the decreased material anchoring of memories.

  • 5.
    Skågeby, Jörgen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Media Futures: premediation and the politics of performative prototypes2016In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 21, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    For centuries our interest in the future has spurred more and less spectacular ideas of potential relationships between bodies, minds and media. Today, we are, perhaps more than ever, surrounded by imaginary media technologies. Through advertising and popular culture our desires for — and fears of — the media of the future are enticed. This paper explores how imaginary media technologies are used to conceive of a relationship between failure and solution and how this relation can be interpreted critically. Theoretically, the paper calls on the notion of performative prototypes and premediation to stress how imagined designs may influence actual technology development, use and imagined interaction. Further, based on the notion that technologies can be interpreted as policies frozen in silicon the paper applies a form of policy analysis which analyses the performative prototypes as so-called problem representations (i.e. as the relations between envisioned problems and imagined resolutions). Three specific cases of fictitious media futures are then used to propose an analytical dimension of speculative solutions. As a general conclusion, the paper points to how imagined technologies calls for a more rigorous discussion of the intentionality and morality of (designed and imagined) machinery; the emergence of cyborg subjectivity; and the normativity perpetuated by designs that potentially limit our imaginable future.

  • 6. Twidalle, Michael
    et al.
    Hansen, Preben
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Agile Research2019In: First Monday, ISSN 1396-0466, E-ISSN 1396-0466, Vol. 24, no 1-7Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we ask: “how might we take the ideas, the methods and the underlying philosophy behind agile software development and explore applying them in the context of doing research — even research that does not involve software development?” We look at some examples of agile research methods and think about how they might inspire the design of even better methods. We also try to address some potential criticisms of an approach that aims to minimize a need for Big Design Up Front by developing tighter iteration cycles, coupled with reflection and learning as part of a process for doing research.

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