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  • 1. Healy, Karen
    et al.
    Lundström, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sallnäs, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    A Comparison of Out-of-home Care for Children and Young People in Australia and Sweden: Worlds Apart?2011In: Australian Social Work, ISSN 0312-407X, E-ISSN 1447-0748, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 416-431Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we present a comparative analysis of out-of-home care in Australia and Sweden. We compare the age structure of the out-of-home care population and the types of out-of-home care services provided to children and young people in both countries. Our analysis reveals that in Australia the out-of-home care service system is focused mainly on children who are deemed to be abused or neglected within their families, while in Sweden the majority of the out-of-home care population are teenagers who cannot live with their families for emotional or behavioural reasons. These population differences intersect with variations in the forms of service provision in both countries, with a much greater reliance on home-based care in Australia than in Sweden, while there is more extensive use of residential care in Sweden. We envisage that this paper will demonstrate how the age structure of the out-of-home care population, though rarely considered in international comparative child welfare research, reveals much about the assumptions on which State intervention with children and young people is based. We intend that this analysis will assist social workers to better understand and address the gaps in the quality and comprehensiveness of out-of-home care service provision to children and young people in both countries.

  • 2.
    Healy, Karen
    et al.
    University of Queensland.
    Lundström, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sallnäs, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Response to Katz's Comment on “Comparison of Out-of-home Care for Children and Young People in Australia and Sweden: Worlds Apart?2011In: Australian Social Work, ISSN 0312-407X, E-ISSN 1447-0748, Vol. 64, no 4, p. 437-442Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 3. Höjer, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Voices of 65 Young People Leaving Care in Sweden: "There Is So Much I Need to Know!"2014In: Australian Social Work, ISSN 0312-407X, E-ISSN 1447-0748, Vol. 67, no 1, p. 71-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to examine young care leavers’ experiences of supportive and nonsupportive factors after leaving care. Telephone interviews were conducted with 65 young people, between 18 and 26 years old, who had left care in Sweden within the previous 3 months to 3 years. The care-leaving process was in many cases described by the young people as badly planned and compressed. Some interviewees received support from the formal network (social services, foster carers, residential homes, contact persons) for housing (37) and financial matters (36), but few received support from the formal network concerning employment (14) and education (11). Emotional support was mainly provided by partners and friends. Altogether, the results suggest that access to support is a helpful factor for young people leaving care, but also that many of our interviewees had no such access, from neither formal nor informal networks.

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