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  • 1.
    Egelund, Tine
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Lausten, M
    Prevalence of mental health problems among children placed in out of home care in Denmark2009In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 156-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper concerns the prevalence of mental health problems among children in family foster and residential care within a Danish context. All children, born in Denmark in 1995, who are or formerly have been placed in out-of-home care (n= 1072), are compared with a group of vulnerable children of the same age, subjected to child protection interventions but living at home (n= 1457, referred to as the ‘in home care children’), and to all contemporaries who are not child protection clients (n= 71 321, referred to as the ‘non-welfare children’). Prevalence data are established on the basis of national administrative register data, including data on psychiatric diagnoses of the children, and on survey data scoring children in out-of-home care, in home care children, and non-welfare children by means of the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Results show that 20% of children in out-of-home care have at least one psychiatric diagnosis compared to 3% of the non-welfare children. Almost half of the children in care (48%) are, furthermore, scored within the abnormal range of SDQ, compared to 5% of the non-welfare children.

  • 2.
    Forsman, Hilma
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Foster carers’ experiences of a paired reading literacy intervention with looked-after children2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 409-418Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that paired reading, a structured literacy intervention, is a promising method for improving looked-after children's literacy skills. The aim of this study was to explore variations in foster carers' experiences of conducting the intervention. Interviews were carried out with 15 Swedish foster carers with varying experiences in programme compliance and of practicing the method. Findings suggest that the intervention process starts with getting carers involved, which seems to be dependent on a positive carer attitude. Integrating the reading training in the everyday life is another important aspect, which evolves around motivating the child and prioritizing the reading sessions. Furthermore, the results emphasize the need of having a flexible approach when delivering the intervention. The results suggest that it is possible to engage foster carers in literacy training for looked-after children and that paired reading can provide a model for competent reading and also result in improved child/carer relations. However, participants need support, and in some cases adjustments in the day-to-day delivery of the intervention are required.

  • 3.
    Hultman, Elin
    et al.
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Alm, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Magnusson, Karin Falth
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Vulnerable children's health as described in investigations of reported children2013In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 117-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores whether the social services weigh in health aspects, and what these may be, when investigating reported children's life situation. Information about physical and psychological health aspects for 259 children in 272 investigations was included. Overall, information about children's health was limited. Problematic emotions were the most commonly reported health aspect in the investigations, whereas suicidal thoughts, self-harm behaviour and gastrointestinal and renal diseases were mentioned least of all. A cluster analysis revealed that the low level of health information group included the largest sample of data and consisted of investigations with minimal information about children's health. The three other cluster groups, Neurological diseases and psychosomatic symptoms, Emotional health and Physical and psychological health and destructive behaviour, consisted of investigations conducted mostly according to the model called Children's Needs In Focus (BBIC, in Swedish, Barns Behov i Centrum). Although these investigations also produced limited information, they provided more than those assessed as having a low level of information about health aspects. The conclusion is that it is necessary to increase information about health aspects in investigations if social welfare systems are to be able to fulfil their ambition of supporting vulnerable children's need of health care.

  • 4. Höjer, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Young people leaving care in Sweden2010In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 118-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The transition from a placement in care to an independent life can be a problematic phase for young people. In Sweden, special care-leaving services are almost non-existent. What then happens to young people when they leave a placement in out-of-home care? This paper draws on the results of a study in which 16 young care leavers between the ages of 18 and 22 years were interviewed. Telephone interviews were also performed with the young care leavers' parents, social workers, foster carers and institutional staff. The aim of the study was to investigate how young care leavers perceive the transition from care to an independent life. The Swedish welfare model, the prolonged transition to adulthood and the family-oriented welfare discourse have been used as analytical perspectives. The results show that young care leavers have a pronounced need for social, emotional, practical and financial support. Whilst such support is occasionally provided by foster carers and residential staff, it is seldom given by social services or biological parents. This group is at risk of facing severe problems in the transitional phase from care to independent life, a fact that is not acknowledged by the Swedish welfare system.

  • 5.
    Linell, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The process of disclosing child abuse: a study of Swedish Social Services protection in child abuse cases2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no Supplement S4, p. 11-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents findings from a study of judgements concerning 137 children (13–18 years) where protection by the Swedish Social Services was applied for. The paper explores the disclosure of physical, sexual and emotional child abuse including experiences of domestic violence and the process following a disclosure. A central finding is that the majority of children (71%) could be described as having intentionally disclosed the abuse. The findings also suggest that many of the children had come a long way in an emotional and cognitive process before the decision to disclose, and that disclosure was often made in conjunction with a decision to leave the alleged abusers. These findings support previous research suggesting children's intentional disclosure as an important predictor of decisions regarding alternative care. Another finding is that the process following the disclosure was described by the children as intensely challenging with active pressure and threats from relatives and feelings of fear, guilt and ambivalence. These findings have implications for both practice and research on how the safeguarding system can help children in the process of disclosure and protect those who do disclose.

  • 6.
    Pålsson, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Conditioned agency? The role of children in the audit of Swedish residential care2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no S2, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At a policy level, governments increasingly stress the importance of children's rights and their ability to participate in decision-making in child welfare services. An example of this is that the Swedish inspectorate targeting children in residential care is required to consult children and to take account of their opinions. This paper details a study exploring the influence that the inspectorate grants children and particularly how children's views influence the inspection process. The study draws on interviews and observations of inspectors as well as an analysis of a representative sample (n = 147) of documentation from inspections performed during 2012. The result indicates different inspectorial rationales, which in turn influence the importance children's opinions are assigned in the inspection process. Moreover, the findings demonstrate difficulties in giving children's views substantial impact on the inspection process. This can be attributed to the fact that most of the regulatory quality criteria used by the authority diverge from the aspects of care that children attach most importance to. The study adds empirical findings to how the participation of children is realized during inspection.

  • 7.
    Shanks, Emelie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Jonsson, Ulf
    Wiklund, Stefan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Rozental, Alexander
    Harmful care. To what extent is terminology from medicine and clinical psychology applicable to out‐of‐home care?2019In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research concerning outcomes for children who have been placed in out‐of‐home care has indicated that the care may have unwanted consequences. However, there has been no coherent terminology for differentiating between different types of such unwanted consequences. In this article therefore, we attempt to disentangle different aspects of potentially harmful care for looked after children, as well as to discuss potential pathways to more systematically approach and report adverse events for this group. In this endeavour, we turn to two adjacent disciplines, medicine and psychology, where these issues have received more interest. The applicability of the concepts used in these fields is discussed, and it is concluded that although they provide some help in categorizing different aspects of harmful care, the complexity of out‐of‐home care makes existing models difficult to adopt without adjustments. This has consequences for the possibility of evaluating care in research, as well as for monitoring adverse events in practice. Importantly, the causality will often be unknown. We therefore suggest that it is essential to shed more light on how decisions should be made about when to intervene or not in out‐of‐home care, despite limited information.

  • 8. Söderqvist, Åsa
    et al.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Bülow, Pia
    Home sweet home? Professionals' understanding of ‘home’ within residential care for unaccompanied youths in Sweden2016In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 591-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of unaccompanied minors arriving in Sweden continues to rise. The majority are placed in residential care units. This qualitative study aims to increase the understanding given by the professionals to the concept of ‘home’ within the framework of residential care for unaccompanied young people. Data are based on participatory observations at two residential care units, followed up by individual interviews with staff. The findings confirm that the concept of home has a complex meaning involving both objective aspects such as physical buildings, and more subjective components that can be seen as state of mind. The staff's desire to offer an ‘ordinary home’ fails because of the surveillance, their dominant positions and especially due to the legal restrictions that were not initially meant for this target group. Unaccompanied young people have to be considered based on their own specific needs in order to make it possible for society to offer the most suitable care.

  • 9.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sallnäs, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Berlin, Marie
    Placement breakdowns in long-term foster care – a regional Swedish study2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, p. 15-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used a regional sample of children in long-term foster care to investigate the prevalence of placement breakdown in adolescence, and to assess risk factors/risk markers for placement disruption. The sample consisted of all 136 foster children in the region, born 1980–1992, who on their 12th birthday had been in the same foster family for at least 4 years. They were followed in case files until date of disruption or their 18th birthday. Data on conditions before and during placement were retrieved from case files, and analysed in bi- and multivariate models. Results showed that one in four placements broke down in adolescence. The median child who experienced a breakdown was 14 years old, and had been in the same foster home for more than 10 years. Prominent risk factors were (i) being placed after age 2 and (ii) having a birth sibling in the same foster home. We also uncovered strong risk markers that can be viewed as precursors of placement disruption. When the child or the foster parents repeatedly over time expressed dissatisfaction with the placement, this ended with a placement breakdown in 60% of cases. Implications for practice are discussed.

  • 10.
    Överlien, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    ‘Do you want to do some arm wrestling?’: children's strategies when experiencing domestic violence and the meaning of age2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 680-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is, by analysing children's and young people's discourses, to investigate their strategies in response to domestic violence episodes, in relation to their age. The empirical data come from individual interviews with children and young people (ages 8–20 years) who had experienced domestic violence and lived at refuges for abused women. The thematic analysis shows that the children describe a wide range of strategies before, during and after a violent episode, that all children act regardless of age and that strategies vary according not only to age but also to situation and context. The theoretical framework used is the sociology of childhood, and the analysis engages with theoretical concepts of age, agency and positioning.

  • 11.
    Øverlien, Carolina
    Norwegian Centre for Violence and Traumatic Stress Studies (NKVTS), Norway.
    ‘He didn't mean to hit mom, I think’: positioning, agency and point in adolescents' narratives about domestic violence2014In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 156-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyses the narratives of adolescents who have experienced domestic violence. It focuses on what we can learn about being an adolescent who experiences domestic violence, using a narrative approach. Attentive to both form and content, the paper sheds light on why the narrative is being told, who the actors in the narratives are, who are positioned in the forefront/background and what the point of the narrative is. The analysis shows that through the storytelling, the father's position as the reluctant/dangerous/weak aggressor is negotiated, the mother is positioned both in the background as a victim and in the forefront as an actor resisting his violent behaviour. The children position themselves as actors with power to alter the progress, to protect and stop the violence. The point of the narratives is to describe the father as the aggressor, and to describe the important role of the children. This picture of the father, mother and child questions the traditional understanding of the father as the aggressor, the mother as the victim and the child as a powerless bystander being exposed to the violence, and underlines the complexities of the dynamics in families living with domestic violence.

1 - 11 of 11
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