Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alm, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Future orientation climate in the school class: Relations to adolescent delinquency, heavy alcohol use, and internalizing problem2016In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 70, p. 324-331Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known, based on previous research, that adolescents' thoughts and feelings about their future are related to the risk of delinquency, alcohol use as well as health. However, other well-known facts are that adolescents' actions are substantially shaped in interaction with peers and that, during adolescence, individuals spend a considerable amount of the day at school, in interaction with classmates. Despite this, there is an almost complete lack of studies exploring to what extent the school climate, as measured by thoughts and feelings about the future, can influence individual adolescents. The aim of the current study is to investigate whether the future orientation (FO) climate, measured at the school class level, is related to delinquency, alcohol use and internalizing problems at the individual level, among a sample of Swedish students 14–15 years of age. The data used come from the Swedish part of the Youth in Europe (YES!) study, which is part of the larger project Children of Immigrants - Longitudinal Survey in Four European Countries (CILS4EU). In the present paper, we use data from the first wave, collected among 8th grade students in 2010/11 (n = 4119–4364). The method used was multilevel modeling (linear probability models (LPM) and linear regression analysis). The results showed that, in school classes where a high proportion of students had a positive future orientation, the risk of heavy alcohol use at the individual level was lower, also after adjusting for individual FO and for individual- and class-level socioeconomic conditions. A similar, but not statistically significant, tendency was found for delinquency. In addition, having a high proportion of students with a positive FO in a school class was associated with fewer internalizing problems, also after controlling for individual FO and socioeconomic conditions at the individual and school class level. We conclude that the surrounding school class, in terms of its general future orientation climate, may play a role for individual outcomes in the form of problem behaviors and mental health.

  • 2.
    Azad, Azade
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology, Clinical psychology.
    Ginner Hau, Hanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Special Education.
    Adolescent females with limited delinquency – At risk of school failure2018In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 95, p. 384-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During adolescence, risk behaviors (e.g., running away from home, truancy, alcohol/drug use, and delinquency) increase, and most individuals who at some point commit crimes do so during their teenage years. Since the crime rate is so high during adolescence, juvenile delinquency can be regarded as a normal rather than a deviant behavior. Delinquent females have historically been under-researched. However, the little research that is available indicates that low-risk female offenders (females with limited delinquency receiving community-based measures), may be at risk of suboptimal development. The objective of the present study was to provide a basic description of this group of offenders by using their self-reports on delinquency, drug and alcohol use, school, peers, family and mental health. The self-reports of 138 females between 15 and 20 years of age sentenced to youth service in Stockholm, Sweden, were compared to young females in residential care and to a reference group of adolescent females without known adjustment problems. The results showed that the youth service females did not have a higher number of accumulated problems than the reference group with regard to criminal acts, drug and alcohol use, peers, mental health, and in some regards also for family. However, the youth service group reported various school-related problems and failures, more in line with the residential group. This suggests that interventions aimed at helping the young females develop strategies for becoming more academically successful are important.

  • 3.
    Berlin, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    School performance in primary school and psychosocial problems in young adulthood among care leavers from long term foster care2011In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 2489-2494Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used data from Swedish national registers for ten entire birth year cohorts (1972–1981) to examine psychosocial outcomes in young adulthood for youth that left long term foster care after age 17, comparing them with majority population peers, national adoptees and peers who had received in-home interventions before age 13. The population was followed in the registers from age 16 to 2005. Data were analyzed in Cox regression models.

    Youth who left long term foster care had six-to eleven fold sex and birth year adjusted excess risks for suicide attempts, substance abuse and serious criminality from age 20, and for public welfare dependency at age 25. Overrisks were considerably lower for the in-home intervention group and the national adoptees. Adjusting results for poor school performance in the final year in primary school (ages 15–16) reduced overrisks by 38–52% for care leavers from long term foster care.

    Irrespective of issues of causality, poor school performance seems to be a major risk factor for future psychosocial problems among youth who age out of long term foster care. The results suggest that promoting foster children's school performance should be given high priority by agencies.

  • 4.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Östberg, Viveca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Cyberbullying and subjective health: A large-scale study of students in Stockholm, Sweden2013In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 112-119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increase in the use of mobile phones and the Internet has given rise to new opportunities for people to meet and communicate. However, there are also dark sides to these new forms of communication. One of these is cyberbullying, i.e. bullying via mobile phone and the Internet. Given that cyberbullying is a relatively new phenomenon, empirical knowledge is still limited and particularly so in Sweden, which in international comparison has reported low rates of bullying in general. The aim of the study is to investigate: 1) the prevalence of cyberbullying among students in Stockholm, Sweden; 2) the overlap between cyberbullying and traditional forms of school bullying, and 3) the association between the experience of cyberbullying and subjective health. The study uses the Stockholm School Survey of 2008 which is a total population survey of students in grade 9 of compulsory school (i.e. aged 15-16) and in the second year of upper secondary school (i.e. aged 17-18) in Stockholm and eighteen of its surrounding municipalities (N=22,544). About 5% of the students are victims of cyberbullying, 4% are perpetrators, and 2% are both victims and perpetrators. There is some overlap between cyberbullying and traditional bullying: those who are victims of traditional bullying are at increased risk of also being victims of cyberbullying; while being a traditional bully is strongly associated with the likelihood of also being a cyberbully. However, many students who are involved in cyberbullying are not involved in traditional bullying. OLS regression analyses show that being a victim of cyberbullying remains associated with worse subjective health when being the victim of traditional bullying and socioeconomic factors are taken into account. In addition, perpetrators of cyberbullying as well as students who are both victims and bullies, have worse subjective health than those who are not involved in cyberbullying.

  • 5.
    Brännström, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Karlsson, Henrik
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Childhood risk factors for disability pension among adult former Swedish child welfare clients: Same or different as for majority population peers?2018In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 84, p. 94-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contributes to the literature on preventing social exclusion, here indicated by collecting disability pension in adulthood, by asking whether the pattern and strength of childhood related risk factors is the same for high-risk child welfare clients, as for their peers in the majority population. Longitudinal register data on > 500,000 Swedes, including around 18,000 former child welfare clients, were analyzed by means of linear probability models and calculations of population attributable fractions. Systematic comparisons of effect sizes suggest that the differences in pattern were marginal, but there were significant differences in strength. Overall, poor educational achievement and low educational attainment were the two most prominent risk factors across all groups, also when prevalence was taken into account. In the majority population, the hypothetical reduction of collecting disability pension was on the scale of 20% if either of the two risk factors could be eliminated. Among child welfare alumni, however, the hypothetical reduction was even larger, nearly 30% on average. Prevention strategies targeting poor school performance and low educational attainment may thus substantially reduce the prevalence of disability pension among adults with a history of child welfare involvement.

  • 6.
    Brännström, Lars
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Risk factors for teenage childbirths among child welfare clients: findings from Sweden2015In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 44-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study contributes to the literature on preventing teenage childbirths by asking whether the pattern and strength of risk factors is the same for high-risk child welfare clients, as for their peers in the majority population. Longitudinal register data on more than 700,000 Swedish females, including around 29,000 child welfare clients, were analyzed by means of linear probability models and calculations of population attributable fractions. Comparisons of effect sizes suggest that the differences in pattern were marginal, but there were notable differences in strength. The girls' school failure was the most prominent risk factor across all groups, also when prevalence was taken into account. In the majority population, the hypothetical reduction of teenage childbirths is on the scale of 30% if this risk factor could be eliminated. In the child welfare subgroups, however, the hypothetical improvement was even larger, around 40%. Reducing the high rate of school failure could thus yield a profound reduction in teenage childbirths in child welfare subgroups, where the incidence of teenage childbirth is substantially higher compared to other peers.

  • 7.
    Fallesen, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Rockwool Foundation Research Unit, Denmark.
    Downward spiral: The impact of out-of-home placement on paternal welfare dependency2016In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 66, p. 45-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we test how out-of-home placement affects men's labor market attachment, and in so doing we provide a novel parallel to existing research on how fatherhood affects men, which focuses almost exclusively on a child's arrival. Using population panel data from Denmark that include all first time fathers whose children were placed in out-of-home care from 1995 to 2005, we find that having a child placed in care is associated with up to a 4 percentage point increase in welfare dependency. Having a child placed in out-of-home care appear to aggravate conditions that likely necessitated the out-of-home placement to begin with, thereby likely necessitating longer duration of out-of-home placements. Thus, out-of-home placements have substantial secondary costs for parents and society.

  • 8.
    Forsman, Hilma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Interventions aiming to improve school achievements of children in out-of-home care: a scoping review2012In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 34, no 6, p. 1084-1091Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The educational underachievement of children in out-of-home care has been known for decades. In this scoping review, we compiled and analyzed – with a narrative approach – evaluated interventions that aimed to improve foster children's school achievements. Despite a comprehensive searching strategy, only eleven relevant studies were found, indicating that little has been done in intervention research to improve educational outcomes for children in public care. Nine out of the eleven interventions reported some positive results. Literacy was improved in most studies, while evaluated attempts to enhance numeracy skills yielded mixed results. Positive results came from a range of different interventions, e.g. tutoring projects and structured individualized support. We conclude that most focused interventions seem to improve foster children's poor academic achievements, but tutoring projects have so far the best empirical support from evaluations with rigorous designs. Also there's a definite need for more intervention research.

  • 9.
    Fransson, Emma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Sarkadi, Anna
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Bergström, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Why should they live more with one of us when they are children to us both?: Parents' motives for practicing equal joint physical custody for children aged 0–42016In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 66, p. 154-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Joint physical custody, i.e., children spending an equal amount of time in both parents' home after a separation or divorce, is increasing in many countries. In line with the national policy to promote paternal involvement in parenting, two-thirds of Swedish preschoolers with non-cohabiting parents live in two homes. Internationally, there has been a debate regarding the benefits or risks with joint physical custody for infants and toddlers. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the reasons given by divorced parents for sharing joint physical custody of children 0-4 years of age. Interviews were conducted with 46 parents (18 fathers and 28 mothers) and analyzed using systematic text condensation. Two themes emerged in response to the research question. In the theme Same rights and responsibilities, parents described that joint physical custody was 'a given' as both parents were seen to have equal rights to and responsibility for the children. Both men and women described involved fatherhood as an ideal goal. In the theme For the sake of the child, parents emphasized that joint physical custody was in the best interest of the child. Some parents had conflicts with their ex-spouses, but were still convinced of the benefits of joint physical custody and strove to make it work.

  • 10. Gornick, Janet C.
    et al.
    Jäntti, Markus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Child poverty in cross-national perspective: Lessons from the Luxembourg Income Study2012In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 558-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper draws on the Luxembourg Income Study (LIS) microdata to paint a portrait of child poverty across a diverse group of countries, as of 2004-2006. We will first synthesize past LIS-based research on child poverty, focusing on studies that aim to explain cross-national variation in child poverty rates. Our empirical sections will focus on child poverty in 20 high- and middle-income countries including three Latin American countries, newly added to LIS. We will assess poverty among all households and among those with children, and using multiple poverty measures (relative and absolute, pre- and post-taxes and transfers). We will assess the effects of crucial micro-level factors - family structure, educational attainment, and labor market attachment - considering how the effects of these factors vary across counties. Finally, we will analyze the extent to which cross-national variation in child poverty is explained by families' characteristics and/or by the effects of (or returns to) those characteristics. Those returns encompass both market and state-generated income.

  • 11.
    Hjalmarsson, Simon
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mood, Carina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Do poorer youth have fewer friends? The role of household and child economic resources in adolescent school-class friendships2015In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 57, p. 201-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Poverty among children and adolescents attracts considerable research interest, and many are concerned with the potential consequences of poverty for children's well-being and development. Research is however lacking on the consequences of economic hardship for children's social relations. This article asks whether adolescents with a lack of economic resources have fewer school-class friends than others, something we would expect given the modern view of poverty as a lack of economic resources that has negative social consequences. We take a child-centred perspective in explicitly acknowledging the role of the child's own economic and material resources alongside the more traditional measurement of parental incomes, and we use sociometric (network) data to assess children's school-class friendships. We find that adolescents with the lowest family incomes and those who often miss out on activities due to a lack of economic resources receive on average fewer friendship nominations and are more likely to experience social isolation in the school class. Access to an own room is also of some importance for the number of friends. These results point towards the importance for adolescents' social relations of having the economic and material possibilities to participate in the social life and in activities undertaken by peers. The estimated effects of household income and of students' own economic situation are largely independent of each other, suggesting that the common practice of assessing child economic conditions through parental income gives an incomplete picture. We suggest that policies directly targeting children's activities and social participation may be a relatively direct and cost-effective way of reducing the impact of economic resources and greatly improve the everyday lives of many adolescents and promote their social inclusion. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

  • 12. Höjer, Ingrid
    et al.
    Sjöblom, Yvonne
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Procedures when young people leave care: Views of 111 swedish social services mangers2011In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 33, no 12, p. 2452-2460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In western societies, there is a general tendency towards a protracted transition to adulthood for young people, who thereby may become increasingly dependent on support from family. Young people leaving a placement in out-of-home care often lack such support, and will thus have a disadvantageous position compared to their peers. With the purpose of looking into the procedures when young people leave a placement in out-of-home care, telephone interviews were performed with 111 managers of social service units in two Swedish regions (West Sweden, and Stockholm Region), using a structured interview schedule. Answering rate was 99.1%.

    Only 6% of the managers had information of the young people's whereabouts once they had left care. 86-88% had general support programmes for all young people concerning housing, employment etc. but only 2-4% had specific programmes for young people leaving care. A majority of the managers were attentive of the difficulties the young people leaving care may encounter, but displayed little awareness of the consequences of a prolonged transition to adulthood, and the need for continued support after leaving care. Several managers referred to the general support of the Swedish welfare state, meaning that young people leaving care had the same access to support as all other young people in Sweden. Consequently, young people leaving care are at risk of being invisible in the welfare system and facing a compressed transition to adulthood.

  • 13. Kaariala, Antti
    et al.
    Berlin, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. The National Board of Health and Welfare (Socialstyrelsen), Sweden.
    Lausten, Mette
    Hiilamoa, Heikki
    Ristikari, Tiina
    Early school leaving by children in out-of-home care: A comparative study of three Nordic countries2018In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 93, p. 186-195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have reported that children and adolescents who have been placed in out-of-home care for the protection of their safety and welfare face considerably high risks for early school leaving. Our study adds to the literature by comparing the association between children's exposure to placement in care and lack of secondary education (i.e. post-compulsory education after age 16) across three Nordic countries: Denmark, Finland, and Sweden. We use data from national registers for children born in 1987, following them until age 23. The datasets for Denmark (N = 55,995, of whom 3056 are in care), Finland (N = 58,855, of whom 1884 are in care), and Sweden (N = 100,152, of whom 3209 are in care) cover the entire birth cohort. To estimate and compare country-specific risks, we calculate average marginal effects from binary logistic regression and adjust the effects for birth mother's socio-economic and health-related background. As expected, the results show that in each country, children placed in care had a significantly higher risk for early school leaving. After adjusting for maternal background, young adults who experienced out-of-home care were 24 to 39 percentage points more likely than their peers never in care to have not completed secondary education. Those placed in care for the first time at teenage were the most likely to have low attainment. In Finland and Sweden, children in care had a similar excess risk for early school leaving, whereas in Denmark the risk was higher. We discuss these results and recommend developing effective interventions to improve the educational attainment of children in care. The difference between Denmark and the other two requires further investigation.

  • 14.
    Lundström, Tommy
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sallnäs, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Sibling contact among Swedish children in foster and residential care: Out of home care in a family service system2012In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 396-402Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates siblingcontact among Swedish fostered children in foster and residentialcare. The study also examines a potential link between siblingcontact and psychosomatic status. Highly structured interviews were conducted with 240 young people (13–18 years) in out of homecare. Results show unfulfilled desire for siblingcontact among children in Swedishout-of-homecare. Nearly 40% of the children interviewed see their siblings more seldom than monthly and a good half of the children—more girls than boys—want more siblingcontact. The longer the time the children have spent in care, the greater is the risk of being without contact with brothers and sisters; and the more seldom the children see their siblings, the more they crave contact. The Swedishfamilyservicesystem is obviously no guarantee of fostered children keeping their desired contact with brothers and sisters. Thus, an important task for social workers and others involved in the life of separated children is to open opportunities for contact—if the children want it. From achildren's rights perspective, it is fundamental to facilitate siblingcontact among fostered children according to their own wishes.

  • 15.
    Magnusson, Charlotta
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Brolin Loftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Self-reported mental health problems in adolescence and occupational prestige in young adulthood: A 10-year follow-up study2019In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 101, p. 174-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many studies have reported a negative association between mental health problems and school performance and some studies have shown long-term negative consequences of such health problems, especially in relation to education. However, less is known about the link between different types of self-reported mental health problems in adolescence and occupational prestige in young adulthood.

    Using prospective survey data collected among 10–18-year-olds who were followed up after ten years (n = 605), the present study investigated, firstly, whether different types of self-reported mental health problems in adolescence – i.e., psychological and psychosomatic complaints, aggression and concentration difficulties – were associated with occupational prestige in young adulthood even after adjusting for childhood socioeconomic conditions; secondly, whether any such associations were partly or fully accounted for by differences in school performance; and thirdly, whether any associations between self-related mental health problems and occupational prestige varied by gender.

    Linear (OLS) regression analyses showed that self-reported concentration difficulties in adolescence were negatively associated with occupational prestige ten years later among both men and women. Aggression in adolescence was also negatively associated with later occupational prestige, but this association was accounted for by concentration difficulties. Psychological and psychosomatic complaints in adolescence were not however associated with occupational prestige in young adulthood. For both men and women, the association between concentration difficulties and occupational prestige was fully accounted for by differences in school grades.

    The findings indicate that self-reported concentration difficulties in adolescence have implications for individuals' occupational prestige in young adulthood among men and women alike. The association could be understood to be mediated by differences in school performance. Thus, to offer adolescents more equal chances of reaching high positions in the labor market, irrespective of their mental health status, it is important to provide adequate support during schooling.

  • 16.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Brännström, Lars
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Disability pension among adult former child welfare clients: a Swedish national cohort study2015In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 56, p. 169-176Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using longitudinal register data on all persons born in Sweden 1973–1978, we report on prevalence of disability pension among young adults who were child welfare clients during their formative years, and explore risk factors for this long-term outcome. For most child welfare subgroups, prevalence approached or exceeded ten percent. Multivariate logistic regression analyses found high crude odds ratios of disability pension among child welfare alumni. These were substantially reduced – but not obliterated – after adjustments for a host of background factors. Decomposition analyses revealed that child welfare alumni’s poor school performance and low educational attainment accounted for most of the confounding effects. We also found that child welfare clients with a disability pension had far higher rates of psychosocial problems in their adult lives than other peers with a disability pension. Child welfare alumni should be regarded as a high risk group for future disability pension and for permanent exclusion from the labor market. Rates of suicidal behavior in adult age were extreme among some subgroups of child welfare alumni with a disability pension, which should be communicated to agencies who are likely to meet these groups (eg. primary health care).

  • 17.
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Cognitive, educational and self-support outcomes of long-term foster care versus adoption:  A Swedish national cohort study2011In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1902-1910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The benefits and pitfalls of different forms of substitute care have rarely been evaluated in comparison with each other. In this study we compared outcomes in youth and young adulthood of long-term foster care and adoption for children who came into the Child Welfare system at a young age. We linked ten national registers with data covering ten national birth cohorts to compare cognitive, educational and self-support outcomes for 900 adoptees with 3100 who grew up in foster care. Outcomes for 900 000 majority population peers were assessed for descriptive purposes. Comparisons adoptees/foster children were done in linear regression models and in Cox regression models with fixed person time. We adjusted the analyses for birth parental related selection/confounding factors (mental health problems, substance abuse and maternal education), and age at placement in substitute care.

    Crude outcomes for both groups were substantially weaker than for majority population peers. The foster children fell clearly short of adoptees on all outcomes; school performance at 15, cognitive competence at 18, educational achievement and self-support capability in young adult years, also after adjustments for birth parent related confounders and age at placement in substitute care.

  • 18.
    von Borczykowski, Annika
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Vinnerljung, Bo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Alcohol and drug abuse among young adults who grew up in substitute care: findings from a Swedish national cohort study2013In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 35, p. 1954-1961Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To what extent substitute long term care modifies intergenerational transmission of substance abuse has rarely been investigated. Using register data, we followed a national cohort born 1973-1985 consisting of 1012 national adoptees, 2408 former children from long term foster care, 348/846 environmental siblings of adoptees/foster children, and 952,935 majority population peers, from their 15th birthday to age 27-35. Using Cox regression, we calculated hazard ratios (HR) for hospital care and criminality associated with illicit drug/alcohol abuse, with adjustments for socio-demographic indicators of caring families, and substance abuse in caring and birth parents. Among 37% of foster children, 9% of adoptees, and 1% of majority population peers, both birth parents had indications of substance abuse. In age/sex adjusted models foster children had four to sevenfold elevated HR for substance abuse outcomes, and adoptees two to threefold HR, in comparison with majority population peers. Estimates were only marginally attenuated after adjustments for socio-demographic indicators and morbidity of caring parents. After adjustments for birth parental substance abuse, HR decreased to around 1.5 for adoptees and foster children equally. Biological children of substitute parents did not differ substantially from majority population peers.

  • 19. Wildeman, Christopher
    et al.
    Fallesen, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Rockwool Foundation Research Unit, Denmark.
    The effect of lowering welfare payment ceilings on children's risk of out-of-home placement2017In: Children and youth services review, ISSN 0190-7409, E-ISSN 1873-7765, Vol. 72, no SI, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although much research considers the relationship between family income and child maltreatment, contact with child protective services (CPS), and out-of-home placement, little research provides a strong causal test of these different relationships. And, as such, it remains unclear how increasing or decreasing the generosity of social welfare programs could affect children's risk of experiencing maltreatment, CPS contact, and out-of-home placement. In this article, we use Danish registry data and a 2004 policy shock to estimate the effect of a substantial decrease in welfare generosity—a monthly reduction in disposable income of 30% for those who were on a specific form of welfare for six consecutive months or more—on children's risk of out-of-home placement. Our results indicate that this decrease in welfare generosity increased children's risk of out-of-home placement by about 1.5 percentage points in any given year, representing an increase of about 25% in the annual risk of out-of-home placement. The results also indicate that in a similar group of welfare-dependent individuals who were not affected by the policy shock, there is only a negligible increase in the risk of out-of-home placement, further buttressing the case for causal effects. Taken together, this article shows that substantial changes in the economic conditions of the poorest families can have a substantial effect on the probability that their children will be placed in out-of-home care.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf