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  • 1.
    Fransson, Emma
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Bergström, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS). Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    What Can We Say Regarding Shared Parenting Arrangements for Swedish Children?2018In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 59, no 5, p. 349-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Joint physical custody (JPC) refers to children living alternatively and about equally with both parents after a parental separation or divorce. The practice has been debated in relation to child well-being because of the frequent moves imposed on children and the potential stress from living in 2 homes. This study describes the background to the high frequency of Swedish children in JPC and the results from research on Swedish children’s well-being in this living arrangement. Children in JPC report better well-being and mental health than children who live mostly or only with 1 parent. No Swedish studies have found children’s health to be worse in JPC than in sole parental care from child age of 3 years and beyond. The existing literature cannot, however, inform us about the mechanisms behind the findings. The risks of selection effects into living arrangements are plausible. For this purpose, longitudinal studies are warranted.

  • 2.
    Trygged, Sven
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Hedlund, Ebba
    Kåreholt, Ingemar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI).
    Education and post-stroke separation among couples with mutual children2011In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 52, no 6, p. 401-414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study based on Swedish registers is to examine the influence of socioeconomic position on poststroke divorce and separation using education as a marker. People aged 18 to 64 who suffered a first stroke between 1992 and 2005 were included if they were married or cohabiting and had mutual children. The material included 42,026 first stroke cases and 424,281 nonexposed persons, both populations divided into three different educational groups. Results show that the risk of separation is much higher in the incident year and in the first poststroke year, above all among people with only compulsory (elementary) education.

  • 3.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Adolescent Educational Outcomes in Blended Families: Evidence from Swedish Register Data2014In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 55, no 7, p. 568-589Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Swedish register data, this article examines the association between having experienced the birth of a younger half-sibling and two educational outcome measures among Swedish 9th graders from 1998 to 2007. The data set, with the full population of 9th graders (N = 874,812), enables us to differentiate between adolescents with maternal as well as paternal half-siblings. The results show that adolescents in postseparation families with half-siblings have lower overall grades and are less likely to be eligible for school continuation after 9th grade than those without half-siblings. The results point to interesting gender patterns both by the sex of the child and whether the half-sibling is maternal or paternal.

  • 4.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Family structure, gender, and adolescent emotional well-being2013In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 54, no 6, p. 476-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on gender differences in emotional well-beingof adolescents in five different family settings. It analyzestwo main mediators—economic deprivation and parental socialization—and is based on unusually rich survey data combiningparental and child reports as well as information from administrativeregisters. The results show lower well-being of childrenin single-mother families and stepfamilies. These associations aremainly mediated through parental socialization rather than economicdeprivation, except for girls in their early to midteens livingwith a single mother. Different patterns of lower well-being levelsfor boys and girls in different family settings are found.

  • 5.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Shared Physical Custody and Children’s Experience of Stress2017In: Journal of Divorce and Remarriage, ISSN 1050-2556, E-ISSN 1540-4811, Vol. 58, no 5, p. 371-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies shared physical custody in Sweden, the country in the world where the phenomenon is most prevalent. We ask whether children in shared physical custody settings are more likely to report high levels of stress compared to children living in sole custody. The analysis is based on data with combined information from parents, children, and administrative registers. The models are controlled control for interparental as well as parent–child relationship quality and parents’ income. The results show that children sharing residence equally have lower likelihood of experiencing high levels of stress. The results can be interpreted as evidence for a positive effect of continuing everyday-like parental relationships after a family dissolution.

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