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  • 1. Aarskaug Wiik, Kenneth
    et al.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Cohabiting and Married Individuals' Relations With Their Partner's Parents2017In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 1111-1124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Norwegian survey data on partnered individuals ages 18 to 55 (N = 4,061; 31% cohabitors), the current study investigated differences across marital and cohabiting unions regarding the patterns of contact with the parents of the partner. In addition to investigating the frequency of such contact, we assessed the nature of and perceived quality of contacts with the partner's parents. The authors grouped respondents according to whether they had children with their partner and controlled for a range of selection characteristics. Results confirmed that parents with preschool children met their in-laws more frequently than the childless, irrespective of union type. Married respondents as well as cohabitors with preschool children reported better relations with their partner's parents than childless cohabitors. Taken together, the results imply that having small children was more decisive for the relationship with the parents of the partner than getting married, particularly with regard to contact frequency.

  • 2.
    Billingsley, Sunnee
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Ferrarini, Tommy
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Family Policy and Fertility Intentions in 21 European Countries2014In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 76, no 2, p. 428-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    European countries show substantial variation in family policy and in the extent to which policies support more traditional male-breadwinner or more gender egalitarian earner-carer family arrangements. Using data from the European Social Survey, the authors implemented multilevel models to analyze variation in fertility intentions of 16,000 men and women according to individual-level characteristics and family policy across 21 European countries. Both traditional and earner-carer family support generosity were positively related to first-birth intentions for men and women. In contrast, only earner-carer support maintains its positive relationship with second birth intentions. Family policy is not in general related to third and higher order parity intentions.

  • 3. Brons, M. D. (Anne)
    et al.
    Härkönen, Juho
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Parental Education and Family Dissolution: A Cross-National and Cohort Comparison2018In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 80, no 2, p. 426-443Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is the first study to systematically analyze whether the association between parental education and family dissolution varies cross-nationally and over time. The authors use meta-analytic tools to study cross-national variation between 17 countries with data from the Generations and Gender Study and Harmonized Histories. The association shows considerable cross-national variation, but is positive in most countries. The association between parental education and family dissolution has become less positive or even negative in six countries. The findings show that the association between parental education and family dissolution is generally positive or nil, even if the association between own education and family dissolution is in many countries increasingly negative. The authors find suggestive evidence that the association is related to the crude divorce rate, but not to the generosity of the welfare state in these countries. The implications of these findings for understanding the stratification in family dissolution are discussed.

  • 4.
    Drefahl, Sven
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    The Married Really Live Longer? The Role of Cohabitation and Socioeconomic Status2012In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 74, no 3, p. 462-475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Numerous studies have shown that married women and men experience the lowest mortality. Legal marital status, however, does not necessarily reflect today's social reality because individuals are classified as never married, widowed, or divorced even when they are living with a partner. Denmark is one of the forerunners of developments in coresidential partnerships and one of only a few countries where administrative sources provide individual-level information on cohabitation for the whole population. Using register information from Statistics Denmark on 3,888,072 men and women ages 18–65, the author investigated mortality differences by living arrangement with hazard regression models. Overall, premature mortality was found to be lowest for married persons, followed by cohabiting persons. Adjusting for socioeconomic status reduced excess mortality of nonmarried individuals. Moreover, a mortality-crossover effect emerged in which cohabiters with above-average socioeconomic status had a lower risk of dying than married people. This finding was particularly pronounced for men.

  • 5.
    Evertsson, Marie
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Nermo, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Dependence Within Families and the Household Division of Labour: A Comparison Between Sweden and the United States2004In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 66, no 5, p. 1272-1286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article assesses the relative explanatoryvalue of the resource-bargaining perspectiveand the doing-gender approach for the divisionof housework in the United States and Swedenfrom the mid-1970s to 2000. The data used arethe Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID)and the Swedish Level of Living Survey. Overallresults show that housework was truly genderedwork in both countries during the entire period.Even so, the results indicate that, unlike Swedishwomen, U.S. women seem to increase theirtime spent in housework when their husbandsare to some extent economically dependent onthem, as if to neutralize the presumed genderdeviance on the part of their spouses.

  • 6. Ma, Li
    et al.
    Turunen, Jani
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology. Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Rizzi, Ester
    Divorce Chinese Style2018In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 80, no 5, p. 1287-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated divorce during China's social and economic transformation period from 1970 to 2012. Specifically, the study examined the trend development of divorce and demonstrated how marriage formation type and individual socioeconomic characteristics were associated with the likelihood of divorce across time. Event-history analysis was applied to longitudinal data from the China Family Panel Studies (2010-2012 waves). The results showed a threefold increase in divorce from the pre-1990s to the 1990s. Surprisingly, the trend shifted to a plateau toward the 2000s. When cohabitation was in its rapidly diffusing stage in the 1990s, individuals who cohabited prior to marriage had a substantially higher likelihood of divorce. As cohabitation became increasingly common in the 2000s, its effect on divorce weakened. The role of socioeconomic characteristics in divorce also varied across time. This study enriches the knowledge of family dynamics in contemporary Chinese society.

  • 7.
    Mood, Carina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden.
    Jan O., Jonsson
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI). Institute for Futures Studies, Sweden; Nuffield College, UK.
    Brolin Låftman, Sara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    The Mental Health Advantage of Immigrant-Background Youth: The Role of Family Factors2017In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 419-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children of immigrant background, despite problems with acculturation, poverty, and discrimination, have better mental health than children of native parents. We asked whether this is a result of immigrant families' characteristics such as family structure and relations. Using a new comparative study on the integration of immigrant-background youth conducted in England, Germany, the Netherlands, and Sweden (N= 18,716), particularly strong associations with mental health (internalizing and externalizing problems) were found for family structure, family cohesion, and parental warmth. Overall, half of the advantage in internalizing and externalizing problems among immigrant-background youth could be accounted for by our measures of family structure and family relations, with family cohesion being particularly important.

  • 8.
    Rostila, Mikael
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Saarela, J.
    Death does not heal all wounds: Mortality following the death of a parent2011In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 73, p. 236-249Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People linked through social ties are known to have interdependent health. Our aim was to investigate such collateral health effects in the context of offspring mortality after a parent's death in children aged 10–59 years. The data (N = 3,753,368) were from a linked-registers database that contains the total Swedish population. In minor children, we found elevations in mortality risks associated with a parent's death. Adult offspring experienced a reduced mortality risk recently after a parent's death, which over time approached, and in some instances even exceeded, that of the general population. Mother's death tended to have a stronger influence than father's death, unnatural parental deaths had a stronger effect than natural ones, and male offspring were more vulnerable than female offspring.

  • 9.
    Stenberg, Sten-Åke
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Inheritance of Welfare Recipiency: An Intergenerational Study of Social Assistance Recipiency in Postwar Sweden2000In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 228-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intergenerational transmission of welfare dependency has received increasing attention among social scientists, especially in the United States, as greater availability of longitudinal data has shed new light on this issue. It remains unclear, however, to what extent the intergenerational correlation of welfare recipiency observed in the United States reflects or interacts with unobserved variables, the racial composition of the population, and the institutional structure of social policies. This study focuses on Sweden, a country with an ethnically homogenous population and institutional social policy structures that differ from those in the United States. It utilizes an internationally unique longitudinal data set to test hypotheses on the inheritance of welfare benefit recipiency as indicated by reliance on means‐tested social assistance. A clear intergenerational effect is observed. This effect, however, reflects a combination of social assistance in the family of origin, children's school adjustment, and parental criminality. Children who lack this combination of problems do not show signs of intergenerational welfare dependency.

  • 10.
    Wiik, Kenneth
    et al.
    Statistisk sentralbyrå, Oslo.
    Noack, Turid
    Statistisk sentralbyrå, Oslo.
    Bernhardt, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    A Study of Commitment and Relationship Quality in Sweden and Norway2009In: Journal of Marriage and Family, ISSN 0022-2445, E-ISSN 1741-3737, Vol. 71, no 3, p. 465-477Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Scandinavian countries are often cited as examples of countries where cohabitation is largely indistinguishable from marriage. Using survey data from Norway and Sweden (N=2,923) we analyzed differences between cohabitors and married individuals in relationship seriousness, relationship satisfaction and dissolution plans. Our analyses reveal that cohabitors overall are less serious and less satisfied with their relationships and are more likely to consider ending their current relationship than are married respondents. The views of cohabitors who report that they intend to marry their current partner within 2 years, however, differ much less from those of married respondents than cohabitors with no marriage plans. This finding suggests that even in Scandinavia cohabitors are a heterogeneous group.

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