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  • 1.
    Bellander, Theres
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Landqvist, Mats
    Becoming the expert constructing health knowledge in epistemic communities online2018In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a discourse analytic framework, the article analyses health blogs and patient’s forum discussions in which parents to children with congenital heart defects recontextualize medical professional knowledge and share their own experiences. The study show how the two types of online media may serve as a means for parents to attain expert status in their own case by sharing lay knowledge expressed as an amalgamation of the two key perspectives – professional and experienced – as an indivisible unit. Monological discourses, such as narrating, in blogs and more direct and immediate responses in forum discussions are noted as examples of differences in how medical facts are explained and negotiated, how advice is provided and how patient expertise is created. The study also show how blogs and especially forum discussions are used to problematize the validity of actions and opinions of medical staff. The role of developing patient expertise in epistemic communities online may therefore come with a risk of spreading misrepresentation of medical cases.

  • 2. Bennett, W. Lance
    et al.
    Segerberg, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Digital Media and the Personalization of Collective Action: Social technology and the organization of protests against the global economic crisis2011In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 770-799Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes related to globalization have resulted in the growing separation of individuals in late modern societies from traditional bases of social solidarity such as parties, churches, and other mass organizations. One sign of this growing individualization is the organization of individual action in terms of meanings assigned to lifestyle elements resulting in the personalization of issues such as climate change, labour standards, and the quality of food supplies. Such developments bring individuals' own narratives to the fore in the mobilization process, often requiring organizations to be more flexible in their definitions of issues. This personalization of political action presents organizations with a set of fundamental challenges involving potential trade-offs between flexibility and effectiveness. This paper analyses how different protest networks used digital media to engage individuals in mobilizations targeting the 2009 G20 London Summit during the global financial crisis. The authors examine how these different communication processes affected the political capacity of the respective organizations and networked coalitions. In particular, the authors explore whether the coalition offering looser affiliation options for individuals displays any notable loss of public engagement, policy focus (including mass media impact), or solidarity network coherence. This paper also examines whether the coalition offering more rigid collective action framing and fewer personalized social media affordances displays any evident gain in the same dimensions of mobilization capacity. In this case, the evidence suggests that the more personalized collective action process maintains high levels of engagement, agenda focus, and network strength.

  • 3. Bennett, W. Lance
    et al.
    Segerberg, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The logic of connective action: Digital media and the personalization of contentious politics2012In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 739-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From the Arab Spring and los indignados in Spain, to Occupy Wall Street (and beyond), large-scale, sustained protests are using digital media in ways that go beyond sending and receiving messages. Some of these action formations contain relatively small roles for formal brick and mortar organizations. Others involve well-established advocacy organizations, in hybrid relations with other organizations, using technologies that enable personalized public engagement. Both stand in contrast to the more familiar organizationally managed and brokered action conventionally associated with social movement and issue advocacy. This article examines the organizational dynamics that emerge when communication becomes a prominent part of organizational structure. It argues that understanding such variations in large-scale action networks requires distinguishing between at least two logics that may be in play: The familiar logic of collective action associated with high levels of organizational resources and the formation of collective identities, and the less familiar logic of connective action based on personalized content sharing across media networks. In the former, introducing digital media do not change the core dynamics of the action. In the case of the latter, they do. Building on these distinctions, the article presents three ideal types of large-scale action networks that are becoming prominent in the contentious politics of the contemporary era.

  • 4. Bennett, W. Lance
    et al.
    Segerberg, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Knüpfer, Curd B.
    The democratic interface: technology, political organization, and diverging patterns of electoral representation2018In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 21, no 11, p. 1655-1680Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Democracies are experiencing historic disruptions affecting how people engage with core institutions such as the press, civil society organizations, parties, and elections. These processes of citizen interaction with institutions operate as a democratic interface shaping self-government and the quality of public life. The electoral dimension of the interface is important, as its operation can affect all others. This analysis explores a growing left-right imbalance in the electoral connection between citizens, parties, elections, and government. This imbalance is due, in part, to divergent left-right preferences for political engagement, organization, and communication. Support on the right for clearer social rules and simpler moral, racial and nationalist agendas are compatible with hierarchical, leader-centered party organizations that compete more effectively in elections. Parties on the left currently face greater challenges engaging citizens due to the popular meta-ideology of diversity and inclusiveness and demands for direct or deliberative democracy. What we term connective parties are developing technologies to perform core organizational functions, and some have achieved electoral success. However, when connective parties on the left try to develop shared authority processes, online and offline, they face significant challenges competing with more conventionally organized parties on the right.

  • 5. Bennett, W. Lance
    et al.
    Segerberg, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Walker, Shawn
    Organization in the crowd: peer production in large-scale networked protests2014In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 232-260Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How is crowd organization produced? How are crowd-enabled networks activated, structured, and maintained in the absence of recognized leaders, common goals, or conventional organization, issue framing, and action coordination? We develop an analytical framework for examining the organizational processes of crowd-enabled connective action such as was found in the Arab Spring, the 15-M in Spain, and Occupy Wall Street. The analysis points to three elemental modes of peer production that operate together to create organization in crowds: the production, curation, and dynamic integration of various types of information content and other resources that become distributed and utilized across the crowd. Whereas other peer-production communities such as open-source software developers or Wikipedia typically evolve more highly structured participation environments, crowds create organization through packaging these elemental peer-production mechanisms to achieve various kinds of work. The workings of these production packages' are illustrated with a theory-driven analysis of Twitter data from the 2011-2012 US Occupy movement, using an archive of some 60 million tweets. This analysis shows how the Occupy crowd produced various organizational routines, and how the different production mechanisms were nested in each other to create relatively complex organizational results.

  • 6.
    Christensen, Christian
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    WAVE-RIDING AND HASHTAG-JUMPING: Twitter, minority ‘third parties’ and the 2012 US elections2013In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 646-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With the description of the 2012 election as the ‘most tweeted’ political event in US history in mind, considering the relative media invisibility of the so-called ‘third-party’ presidential candidates in the US election process, and utilizing the understanding of retweeting as conversational practice, the purpose of this paper is to examine the use of Twitter by the four main ‘third-party’ US presidential candidates in the run-up to the 2012 presidential election in order to better understand (1) the volume of tweets produced by the candidates; (2) the level of interaction by followers in the form of retweeting candidate/party tweets; and, (3), the subject and content of the tweets most retweeted by followers of the respective parties. The ultimate goal of the paper is to generate a broader picture of how Twitter was utilized by minority party candidates, as well as identifying the issues which led followers (and their respective followers) to engage in the ‘conversational’ act of retweeting.

  • 7.
    Larsen, Rasmus Klocker
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm Environment Institute.
    Powell, Stina
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Sriskandarajahb, Nadarajah
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
    Peterson, Tarla Rai
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Urban and Rural Development, Uppsala.
    Towards a learning model of ICT application for development: lessons from a networked dialogue in Sweden2010In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 43-63Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Niknam, Niloofar
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Journalism, Media and Communication (JMK).
    HIDDEN MEDIA The mobile phone in an Iranian cultural context with a focus on Bluetooth messaging2010In: Information, Communication and Society, ISSN 1369-118X, E-ISSN 1468-4462, Vol. 13, no 8, p. 1172-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Exchanging Bluetooth messages via mobile phones, in a short period of time, have become a popular way of communication among the Iranian youth. A quick look at the content of Bluetooth messages shows that they vary from pure entertaining videos to serious religious or political audio files, or even pornographic images. However, Bluetooth messaging in this research is considered as a medium of interpersonal communication, which serves several functions for youngsters. Approximately 120 young people between the age of 17 and 30 living in different areas of Tehran were surveyed regarding their consumption of this technology, their attitude towards it and their gender-based behaviours in using the technology. The results show that Bluetooth is a leisure technology which is seen both as a threat to, and promise for, youth in the society. It helps young people get access to different contents, express their needs and represent their own culture.

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