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  • 1. Härter Griep, Rosane
    et al.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Santos, Itamar S.
    Rotenberg, Lucia
    Juvanhol, Leidjaira Lopes
    Goulart, Alessandra C.
    Aquino, Estela M.
    Benseñor, Isabela
    Work-family conflict, lack of time for personal care and leisure, and job strain in migraine: Results of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)2016In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 59, no 11, p. 987-1000Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Work-family conflict and time scarcity may affect health. We investigated the association between these issues and migraine, taking into account job strain.

    Methods

    Baseline data from ELSA-Brasil (6,183 women; 5,664 men) included four indicators of work-family conflict: time- and strain-based interference of work with family (TB-WFC, SB-WFC), interference of family with work (FWC) and lack of time for personal care and leisure (LOT). Migraine was classified according to International Headache Society criteria.

    Results

    Among women, definite migraine was associated with SB-WFC (odds ratio [OR] = 1.28; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.06–1.55), FWC (OR = 1.32; 1.00–1.75), and LOT (OR = 1.30; 1.08–1.58). Probable migraine was associated with SB-WFC (OR = 1.17; 1.00–1.36). High psychological job demands and low social support interacted with LOT in association with definite migraine. Among men, probable migraine was associated with LOT (OR = 1.34; 1.09–1.64), and there were interactions between job strain and WFC for probable migraine.

    Conclusions

    Balancing the demands of professional and domestic spheres could be highly relevant in the management of migraines.

  • 2. Santos, Aline E.
    et al.
    Araujo, Larissa F.
    Griep, Rosane H.
    Castro Moreno, Claudia R.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Stress Research Institute. University of São Paulo, Brazil.
    Chor, Dora
    Barreto, Sandhi M.
    Giatti, Luana
    Shift work, job strain, and metabolic syndrome: Cross-sectional analysis of ELSA-Brasil2018In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 61, no 11, p. 911-918Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Shift work and psychosocial stressors may contribute to higher metabolic syndrome (MetS) incidence. Few studies investigated whether the presence of both factors simultaneously has a synergic effect on risk of MetS. Methods: This cross-sectional analysis used baseline data (2008-2010) for 10960 current workers from ELSA-Brasil. Multiple logistic regression was used to estimate independent associations between shift work and job strain and MetS. An interaction between these factors was tested by including a multiplicative term in the final model. Results: Exposure to three-shifts a week (that is, three 12 h shifts of work followed by 36 h of rest) and high job-strain were independently associated with greater risk of MetS. We found no indication (P > 0.05) of interaction between working in shifts and job strain on MetS. Conclusions: Efforts to reduce job strain and shift work should be considered as part of a primary prevention strategy to reduce the risk of MetS.

  • 3.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Exploring the Interplay Between Work Stress and Socioeconomic Position in Relation to Common Health Complaints: The Role of Interaction2011In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 54, no 10, p. 780-790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This study explored the interplay between work stress and socioeconomic position and investigated if the interaction of work stress and low socioeconomic position is associated with poorer health. Methods A representative sample of the Swedish working population, including 2,613 employees (48.7% women) aged 19-64 years, was analyzed. The health outcomes were poor self-rated health, psychological distress, and musculoskeletal pain. Work stress was operationalized as job strain and effort-reward imbalance, and socioeconomic position as occupational class. Interaction analysis was based on departure from additivity as criterion, and a synergy index (SI) was applied, using odds ratios (ORs) from logistic regressions for women and men. Results/Conclusions In fully adjusted models, work stress, and in a lesser extent also socioeconomic position, was associated with higher odds for the three health complaints. The prevalence of poorer health was highest among those individuals jointly exposed to high work stress and low occupational class, with ORs ranging from 1.94 to 6.77 (95% CI 1.01-18.65) for poor self-rated health, 2.42-8.44 (95% CI 1.28-27.06) for psychological distress and 1.93-3.93 (95% CI 1.11-6.78) for musculoskeletal pain. The joint influence of work stress and low socioeconomic position on health was additive rather than multiplicative.

  • 4.
    Toivanen, Susanna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Health Equity Studies (CHESS).
    Mellner, Christin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Vinberg, Stig
    Self-employed persons in Sweden: mortality differentials by industrial sector and enterprise legal form : a five-year follow-up study2015In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, ISSN 0271-3586, E-ISSN 1097-0274, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 21-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: This study investigated mortality differentials between self-employed persons in Sweden, considering industrial sector, enterprise characteristics and socio-demographic factors.

    Methods: Data on 321,274 self-employed persons were obtained from population registers in Sweden. Cox proportional hazards models were used to compare all-cause and cause-specific mortality rate ratios by industrial sector and enterprise legal form, adjusted for confounders.

    Results: All-cause mortality was 10–32% higher in self-employed persons in Manufacturing and Mining, Trade and Communication, and Not Specified and Other sectors than in Agriculture, Forestry, and Fishing. Mortality from cardiovascular disease was 23% higher in Trade and Communication, and from neoplasms 17–51% higher in Manufacturing and Mining, Not Specified, and Other. Mortality from suicide was 45–60% lower in Personal and Cultural Services, and in Not Specified. Mortality was 8–16% higher in sole proprietorship than limited partnership.

    Conclusions: Further research of working conditions is warranted, considering industry and enterprise legal form.

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