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  • 1. Bowden, Jacqueline A.
    et al.
    Delfabbro, Paul
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Miller, Caroline L.
    Wilson, Carlene
    Alcohol consumption and NHMRC Guidelines: has the message got out, are people conforming and are they aware that acohol causes cancer?2014In: Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, ISSN 1326-0200, E-ISSN 1753-6405, Vol. 38, no 1, p. 66-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine self-reported alcohol consumption and relationships betweenconsumption, awareness of the 2009 NHMRC guidelines of no more than two standard drinksper day, drinking in excess of the guideline threshold and perceptions of alcohol as a risk factorfor cancer.

    Methods: Questions were included in annual, cross-sectional surveys of about 2,700 SouthAustralians aged 18 years and over from 2004 to 2012. Consumption data for 2011 and 2012were merged for the majority of analyses.

    Results: In 2011 and 2012, 21.6% of adults drank in excess of the guideline threshold (33.0%males; 10.7% females). While 53.5% correctly identified the NHMRC consumption thresholdfor women, only 20.3% did so for men (39.0% nominated a higher amount). A large minoritysaid they did not know the consumption threshold for women (39.2%) or men (40.4%). In2012, only 36.6% saw alcohol as an important risk factor for cancer. Important predictors ofexcess consumption for men were: higher household income; and not perceiving alcohol as animportant risk factor for cancer. Predictors for women were similar but the role of householdincome was even more prominent.

    Conclusions: Men were nearly three times as likely to drink in excess of the guidelines aswomen. The majority of the population did not see an important link between alcoholand cancer. Awareness of the latest NHMRC guidelines consumption threshold is still low,particularly for men.

    Implications: A strategy to raise awareness of the NHMRC guidelines and the link betweenalcohol and cancer is warranted.

  • 2. Mugavin, Janette
    et al.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). La Trobe University, Australia.
    MacLean, Sarah
    Callinan, Sarah
    Strategies associated with low-risk drinking: a population-based study2018In: Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, ISSN 1326-0200, E-ISSN 1753-6405, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 315-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To examine the relative frequency of use of seven strategies to moderate drinking (SMD) among low-risk and risky drinkers.

    Methods: Cross-sectional data from the 2013 National Drug Strategy Household Survey was used. The analytical sample included 11,462 Australians aged 18-64 who had consumed alcohol in the previous year. Logistic regression was used.

    Results: Analyses indicated a curvilinear relationship between use of SMD and alcohol consumption. Across the seven SMD, constant use of a strategy, compared with never using a strategy, was associated with low-risk drinking. Never using a strategy, compared with using one rarely, was also associated with low-risk drinking. When used occasionally, strategies that implied less alcohol consumed per hour (e.g. refuse unwanted drinks) increased the likelihood of low-risk drinking, whereas less direct strategies (e.g. counting drinks) increased the likelihood of risky drinking.

    Conclusions: Adult Australians who drink at low levels use a range of strategies to moderate their alcohol consumption. Overall, consistent use of one or more SMD was associated with low-risk drinking patterns.

    Implications: Public health responses to risky drinking may be enhanced by promoting the consistent use of SMD as a way to reduce overall alcohol consumption.

  • 3. Ogeil, Rowan P.
    et al.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD). University of Melbourne, Australia; Turning Point, Australia.
    Matthews, Sharon
    Lloyd, Belinda
    Alcohol and burden of disease in Australia: the challenge in assessing consumption2015In: Australian and New Zealand journal of public health, ISSN 1326-0200, E-ISSN 1753-6405, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 121-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Alcohol consumption is one of the major avoidable risk factors for disease, illness and injury in the Australian community. Population health scientists and economists use estimates of alcohol consumption in burden of disease frameworks to estimate the impact of alcohol on disease, illness and injury. This article highlights challenges associated with estimating alcohol consumption in these models and provides a series of recommendations to improve estimates. Methods: Key challenges in measuring alcohol consumption at the population level are identified and discussed with respect to how they apply to burden of disease frameworks. Results: Methodological advances and limitations in the estimation of alcohol consumption are presented with respect to use of survey data, population distributions of alcohol consumption, consideration of patterns' of alcohol use including bingeing', and capping exposure. Key recommendations for overcoming these limitations are provided. Implications and conclusion: Alcohol-related burden has a significant impact on the health of the Australian population. Improving estimates of alcohol related consumption will enable more accurate estimates of this burden to be determined to inform future alcohol policy by legislators.

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