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  • 1.
    Abrahamson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol in courtship contexts. Focus group interviews with young Swedish women and men2004In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 31, p. 3-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Abrahamson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Perceptions of heavy drinking and alcohol problems among young adults2003In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 30, p. 815-837Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Abrahamson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Young women’s and men’s different worlds of alcohol, fear and violence in focus group discussions with 18 year olds in Stockholm.2006In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 33, p. 2-27Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Carstairs, Catherine
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Becoming a “hype”: heroin consumption, subcultural formation and resistance in Canada, 1945-19612002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 91-115Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 1940s and 1950s a new subculture of heroin use developed in Vancouver and Toronto. The users were primarily working-class or poor and often came from troubled family backgrounds. Heroin use was a way of satisfying longings and cravings and of establishing a sense of identity and community. Heroin's status as a banned substance with a frightening reputation ensured that consuming it was also an act of defiance and resistance against community norms. This paper explores the use of heroin as a consumer commodity and symbol of resistance, and locates the development of this drug-using subculture in the distinctive socio-economic and cultural circumstances of post-World War II Canada. (Author' s abstract)

  • 5.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sweden, the EU and the alcohol traveller’s allowances2010In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 3--38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Restrictive alcohol policies have a long history at the national level in Sweden; however, with the accession to the European Union the international component of alcohol policy has become clearer, and the national policies have been eroded. Sweden had to abandon low traveller’s allowances and gradually adopt the considerably higher European levels by January 1, 2004. On the EU level the traveller’s allowances were an issue long before Sweden’s accession, and high allowances were a conscious way of forcing down high taxes as an instrument of harmonization. The purpose of the article is to analyze how the changes and the Swedish government’s actions on the traveller’s allowances issue have been understood. Analyzing this case contributes to understanding the major changes that have occurred in Swedish alcohol policy since the mid-1990s. Different narratives from interviews, official documents, and news articles make it possible to understand alcohol policy developments in Sweden in relation to the EU. The article finds that there are five main narratives which have been used to try to explain the development of the traveller’s allowances question: the Misinterpretation Explanation, the Double Accounts Explanation, the Impotence Explanation, the Humility Explanation, and the Optimism Explanation. The article also shows that the different narratives have developed over time, indicating a learning process among Swedish authorities on the functioning of EU policy processes.

  • 6.
    Cisneros Örnberg, Jenny
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Impacts of Tourism on Drinking and Alcohol Policy in Low-And Middle-Income Countries: A Selective Thematic Review2014In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 145-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article considers impacts of the drinking patterns of tourists from high-consumption, high-income societies on low- and middle-income societies, thematically reviewing a rather sparse literature. Drinking — indeed, drinking more than at home — fits well into the context of tourism. Heavy drinking by tourists has a substantial impact on many elements in the host society, increasing consumption levels particularly among young people working within the tourism sector. Tourist industry interests have often successfully argued for policies that result in a wider general availability of alcohol in the society, and provision for tourists has often served as an entry point in the society for the global alcohol industry. National and international consideration of policies to reduce alcohol problems should take into consideration the potential adverse influences on national alcohol policies arising from tourism.

  • 7. Cunningham, J.A.
    et al.
    Blomvist, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Koski-Jännes, A.
    Cordingley, J.
    Callaghan, R.
    Characteristics of former heavy drinkers: results from a natural history of drinking general population survey2004In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 357-369Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Edman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Swedish Drug Treatment and the Political Use of Conceptual Innovation 1882–19822012In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 429-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the concepts applied to drug use and drug users in Sweden during the years 1882–1982. As a theoretical point of departure, concepts are treated as political tools and conceptual descriptions as political work. From an analysis of 43 public reports, three distinct periods stand out. In the first period, 1882–1962, there was no specific political need for conceptualclarity. During the second period, 1964–1969, the political need for certain (medicalized) concepts is more evident. Drug users were understood as sick and as potential objects for compulsory treatment. In the third period, during the mid-1970s and early 1980s, the process was reversed: specific concepts of sick drugusers gave way to creating the political means for bringing alcohol and other drug users under joint treatment legislation.

  • 9.
    Eriksson, Lena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Edman, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Knowledge, Values, and Needle Exchange Programs in Sweden2017In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 105-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the turn of the millennium, calls for evidence-based drug policy have become increasingly louder. In response, researchers have generated a large body of evidence in support of measures such as needle exchange programs (NEPs), while another strand of research testifies that policy makers often neglect to take the research evidence into account and hence fail to introduce these programs. This article studies the interplay between research-based knowledge, values, and policy making during 16 years of intense parliamentary debate in Sweden on the needle exchange issue. In 2000, the future of the two existing experimental NEPs was uncertain; in 2006, the regulations were reformed; and in 2015, they underwent a government inquiry. Both the reform and the inquiry aimed at regulating and expanding the programs. The analysis is guided by work done within the tradition of science-policy nexus, where the increased emphasis on evidence-based political measures is problematized. As drug policy arouses normative and ethical concerns, the analysis also explores values. The study illustrates the central role that values play in a policy field which is repeatedly declared to be science based. Within the overall framework of the Swedish drug policy ideology of a drug-free society, the advocates of NEPs framed drug misuse as a consequence of either an unjust society or a disease, arguing that because misuse is a condition beyond the control of the individual, the Swedish welfare state has an obligation to take care of those affected. For their part, the opponents framed drug misuse as a result of misguided attitudes, which would only be corrected by restrictions and prohibition. In their view, NEPs are a tool for drug policy liberalization. In the debate between the two positions, research evidence played only a minor role.

  • 10.
    Eriksson, Mimmi
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Olsson, Börje
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Osberg, Johanna
    Alcohol prevention in the Swedish workplace – who cares?2004In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 263-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we discuss what interest, and whose interest, there is in working with alcohol and drug prevention in workplaces. As the Swedish alcohol policy has weakened, alternative ways for primary prevention are sought. Public reports have pointed out the workplace as one arena for prevention that could compensate for the government's diminishing alcohol control. Will this work? What conditions are necessary in order to work successfully with these issues in a corporate environment? Several studies have suggested that there is little interest in working with prevention in workplaces, and this study supports this finding. This study involved interviews at 16 companies in Sweden with personnel managers, employees (in focus groups), union representatives, and in some cases the company's health care department. In a preliminary stage the findings verified our hypothesis that the overall interest in primary prevention in reality is not that strong. The participants in the study believed that the responsibility lies in intervention when the alcohol or drug problem has arisen, and there is really not much the company can do to prevent people from using alcohol or drugs.

  • 11. Fraser, Suzanne
    et al.
    Ekendahl, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    “Getting Better”: The Politics of Comparison in Addiction Treatment and Research2018In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 87-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The alcohol and other drug field is characterized by great diversity in kinds of treatment and treatmentphilosophies. Even the kinds of problems treatment is expected to address vary significantly, althoughagreement seems to exist that the general purpose is to help people “get better.” This article considersthis diversity, drawing on a qualitative project conducted in three countries: Australia, Canada, andSweden. Inspired by the project’s multisite approach and the questions it raises about comparativeresearch, the article critically engages with the notion of “comparison” to think through what is atstake in making comparisons. Analyzing 80 interviews conducted with policy makers, service provi-ders, and peer advocates, the article maps key ways treatment is conceptualized, identifying in them acentral role for comparison. Participants in all sites invoked the need to consider addiction a multi-faceted problem requiring a mix of responses tailored to individual differences. Related notions of“holism” were also commonly invoked, as was the need to concentrate on overall improvements inwell-being rather than narrow changes in consumption patterns. In conducting this analysis, this articleposes a series of critical questions. What kinds of comparisons about quality of life, the self, and well-being do treatments for addiction put into play? What categories and criteria of comparison arenaturalized in these processes? What kinds of insights might these categories and criteria authorize,and what might they rule out? In short, what does it mean to understand alcohol and other drug useand our responses to it as intimately intertwined with the need to “get better,” and what happenswhen we scrutinize the politics of comparison at work in getting better through addiction treatment?We conclude by arguing for the need to find new, fairer, ways of constituting the problems we pre-sently ascribe to drugs and addiction.

  • 12.
    Heimdahl, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Balancing Between Hope and Realism: Exploring Professional Accounts of the Transition Into Parenthood of Pregnant Women Who Use2018In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pregnancy for women who use substances has sometimes been referred to as a “window of opportunity” for lifestyle change. In this article, the aim is to analyze professional accounts of the transition of substance-using pregnant women into parenthood. Focus groups were carried out with professionals working at specialized maternity care units in Sweden. The analysis is guided by the discursive psychological concept of “ideological dilemma” and focuses on contradictory elements of commonsense-making in the participants’ discussions. The results suggest that professionals articulate two, partly contradictory, ideals: on the one hand, “believing in the patient” and, on the other, “being realistic.” In their descriptions of their work with patients, professionals emphasize the significance of adjusting the self-image of the patients and increasing their awareness of their “abuse” problems in order to prevent future clashes between high expectations and reality. At the same time, they also underline that interacting with and treating those patients with the most serious problems as individuals with unforeseen strengths and resources is a matter of professional duty.

  • 13.
    Lalander, Philip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Who directs whom?: Films and reality for young heroin users in a Swedish town2002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, no Spring, p. 65-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through interviews and observations the researcher investigates the links between a “real” heroin-based subculture in the Swedish town Norrköping and the simulated subcultures in different films. Drawing on Goffman's theories of everyday-life dramatics, the focus is on how the young heroin users idealize a personal front and a façade in creating an image of themselves as genuine outsiders. From films they internalize a media package that they use for self-reflection. This package includes 1. knowledge about how to perform to create an outsider identity; 2. an image of success, a fast-reward system that is contrasted to the “mainstream's” view of how a career should be done; 3. an alternative morality in which the established “rule enforcers” are not seen as superior when it comes to moral issues. When internalizing this media package, by interpretations and negotiations in the group, outsider acts and symbols become something of value, a subcultural capital.

  • 14.
    Landberg, Jonas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Effects of the transition to beverages with lighter alcohol content in Sweden 1950-20012011In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 541-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article was to study whether the transition to lighter beverages in Sweden has been associated with a decrease in alcohol-related harm. The analyses were based on Swedish aggregate time-series data on alcohol consumption and different forms of alcohol-related mortality for the period 1950-2001. A descriptive trend comparison revealed that, since the 1970s, the mortality rates per liter for most studied outcomes followed the trend in proportion of spirits fairly well. Time-series model estimations only partially supported this picture: Beverage-specific models revealed that, of all beverages, spirits was significantly related to most different forms of mortality, but in models that included proportion of spirits (controlling for total consumption), the association was only significant for male liver cirrhosis. In conclusion, the findings do not support the idea that the composition of beverages in the total composition has an independent effect on alcohol-related harm. However; because per capita consumption of spirits was significantly related to more forms of mortality than beet" or wine, we cannot rule out alcohol policy measures directed towards the consumption of stronger beverages as being noneffective in terms of reducing alcohol-related harm.

  • 15.
    Leifman, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    A comparative analysis of drinking patterns in six EU countries in the year 20002002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, no Fall, p. 501-548Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper compares different aspects of drinking habits in six EU countries: France, Italy, Germany, the UK, Finland and Sweden. Frequency of drinking is highest in France and Italy, lowest in Finland and Sweden, and increases with age in France and Italy in particular, but also in Germany. The average consumed quantity per drinking occasion is highest in Finland, Sweden and the UK and lowest in France and Italy, and the youngest show the highest quantity per drinking occasion in most countries. Also intoxication-oriented drinking is most common in Finland, Sweden and the UK, and in all countries except Italy the youngest report the highest frequency of intoxication. The youngest show the highest mean alcohol consumption in Finland, Sweden and the UK, but the lowest in France, Italy and Germany. In all six countries, men consume at least twice as much alcohol as women.

  • 16.
    Leifman, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The six-country survey of the European comparative alcohol study: comparing patterns and assessing validity2002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, no Fall, p. 477-500Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper introduces a set of analyses of national surveys carried out in six countries—Finland, Sweden, Germany, Great Britain, France and Italy-as part of the European Comparative Alcohol Study (ECAS). The ECAS survey data were collected especially for the purpose of country comparisons. Therefore not only were the questions made as similar as possible in all six countries, but also the mode of data collection (telephone interviews), the sampling procedure (random sampling of telephone numbers), and the time of data collection (spring 2000). Despite all these efforts to ensure a high comparability, the crucial question of comparability of alcohol surveys in general, and of the ECAS six-country survey in particular, was raised at an early stage, since large differences were found among the six samples in response rates and in estimates of volume of drinking in relation to recorded per capita consumption (coverage rate). This paper pays attention to some of the validity problems in survey data in general and to the specific problems associated with this comparative survey approach in particular.

  • 17.
    Månsson, Josefin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Ekendahl, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Protecting Prohibition: the Role of Swedish Information Symposia in Keeping Cannabis a High-Profile Problem2015In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 209-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent years, political discussions about how to deal with cannabis use have become increasingly centered on harm reduction and liberalization in large parts of the Western world. In Sweden, however, no such re-framing of the issue has occurred. There has been political status quo with emphasis on prohibition and zero tolerance. This study aims to elucidate how the cannabis policy discourse in Sweden is characterized today to legitimize restrictive drug policy and counter global changes. Two symposia dedicated to dissemination of cannabis information in Sweden were analyzed to understand how policy players, service providers, and other professionals invited to speak at these events argue to maintain cannabis use a high-profile societal problem that necessitates prohibition. With the help of Carol Bacchi’s theoretical approach “What’s the Problem Represented to be,” we critically analyzed how cannabis is constructed in the material. This meant focusing on what policy and service provision that is described as meaningful and effective as a way to understand what the problem of cannabis is represented to be. Our analysis showed, among other things, that cannabis-positive attitudes are seen as utterly problematic, that youth users are portrayed as extremely vulnerable, and that current government responses are perceived as righteous and compassionate. It also showed how speakers at symposia construct a morally upright “us” who promote “reliable” scientific evidence about the dangers of cannabis. In this way, the choice between keeping prohibition and trying liberalization stands out as one between letting reliable or unreliable research guide drug policy. We conclude that youth becomes a perfect category to rationalize current problematizations; a vessel that may carry and protect drug prohibition in a globalized world where cannabis is increasingly handled like an ordinary commodity.

  • 18.
    Palm, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Priorities in Swedish alcohol and drug treatment: Policies, staff views and competing logics2006In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 33, p. 367-399Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Ramstedt, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol consumption and the experience of adverse consequences: a comparison of six European countries2002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 549-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes prevalence rates of self-reported experiences of alcohol-related problems in six Western European countries and examines how self-reported consumption of alcohol is associated with the likelihood of experiencing these problems. Of particular interest is to assess whether alcohol is more strongly associated with the likelihood of experiencing adverse consequences in Northern Europe than in countries in Central and Southern Europe. Data on self-reported volume of drinking and binge drinking and of experiences of various alcohol-related problems from a general population survey undertaken in Finland, Sweden, Germany, the UK, France and Italy during the spring of 2000 were analyzed. The number of respondents was about 1,000 men and women (ages 18-64) in each country. In the assessment of the link between drinking and harm, results showed that the overall prevalence of alcohol-related harm was highest in Finland and the UK and lowest in Southern Europe. A general positive association was found between volume of drinking and problems, although some country differences were observed. The risk curve analysis also revealed that problems occurred at fairly low drinking levels. In the multivariate logistic regression analyses, the volume of drinking and a measure of binge drinking were both statistically significant predictors of most problems in most countries. A major conclusion is that both volume of drinking and binge drinking are important determinants of the risk of experiencing adverse consequences from drinking in all six European countries.

  • 20.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    "Contemporary Drug Problems” then and now – an editor’s envoi2010In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 193-196Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Intoxicated ientities: acohol's power in Mexican history and culture / by Tim Mitchell2004In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 585-588Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Review of: From Hunting to Drinking: The Devastating Effects of Alcohol on an Australian Aboriginal Community, by David McKnight (London & New York: Routledge, 2002), 224 p.2003In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 30, p. 911-913Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The political response to alcohol and drug advice in Australia: Comparing the response to two expert reports2010In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 525-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines the contents and policy response to two expertreports, one on drugs and one on alcohol, which were commissionedby the government of Victoria, Australia. The drug report was awide-ranging response to what was seen as a crisis, but its mainrecommendations were not adopted. The recommendations wereprimarily in a highly contested policy area, but the lack of actionmay also have reflected a dramatic reduction in heroin overdosedeaths shortly after the report appeared. The alcohol report wascommissioned in a narrow frame of loosening liquor licensingrestrictions to increase competition, defined as taking precedenceover public health and order considerations. Its recommendationswere quickly adopted, setting the stage for a political furor a decadelater over alcohol-fueled violence. The lessons from the decade ofexperience after the reports are considered.

  • 24.
    Room, Robin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Bullock, Sandra
    Can alcohol expectations and attributions explain Western Europe's north-south gradient in alcohol's role in violence?2002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, p. 619-648Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent time-series analyses provide further support to the idea of a north-south gradient in Western Europe in alcohol's role in homicide. Differences in drunken comportment have long been hypothesized as part of the explanation. Five items about expectations about alcohol's role in violence, and the potential excuse-value of intoxication, were asked of 1,000 adults in an RDD survey in each of six countries: Finland, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Germany, France and Italy. The results were not in the expected direction. Finnish respondents were more likely than others to value not showing any effects after drinking. Italian, French and British respondents were the most likely to believe that getting drunk leads to violence. Italian, German and British respondents were most likely to believe that friends should forgive and forget after drunken anger, and Italians and British were the most likely to excuse behavior because of drunkenness. The results are discussed, and the interplay of the items, and within-population variations in responses to them, are explored comparatively in the six national samples.

  • 25.
    Room, Robin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sato, Hanako
    Drinking and drug use in youth cultures: 1. Building identity and community2002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 5-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Room, Robin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Sato, Hanako
    Drinking and drug use in youth cultures: 2. Intoxication, camaraderie, and control2002In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 245-251Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Roumeliotis, Filip
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Drug use and affective politics: The political implications of social emotional training2016In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 331-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how a Swedish program for social emotional learning establishes a relationship between the subject and emotions, and the political implications of this relationship. This includes an examination of how emotions fit with notions of “evidence-based policy” in the drug field. The key questions are: (1) How are emotions constituted in programs of social emotional training (SET)? (2) How is the subject and its relationship to emotions and social norms constituted in this program? (3) What are the political implications of the relationship between the subject and emotions? The article shows that the SET program seeks to instill in the subject the ability to identify and control emotions in order to become an emotionally mature subject. The program establishes a neurodisciplinary regime where the subject is to “re-wire” its synaptic links through repetition, decoupling emotions from their cultural context. Emotions are thus reified as internal entities arising from the central nervous system. The SET program constructs a social bond which demands adherence to specific social norms governing democratic participation. The subject is expected to control its emotions and engage in cooperation, negotiation, and conflict resolution within a model of democratic communication. Refusal or inability to adhere to the norms implicit in this model of communication risk relegating the subject to the sphere of the irrational, thereby disqualifying certain practices and responses from the sphere of the political. This is what happens to drug users, as drug use is constructed as an expression of irrationality. The SET program also pacifies individuals politically by turning issues such as drug use, unemployment, and education into matters of acquiring skills rather than political action.      

  • 28.
    Samuelsson, Eva
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Substance use and treatment needs: constructions of gender in Swedish addiction care2015In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 188-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Men’s and women’s drinking tend to elicit different societal reactions, which may be attributed to different perceptions of masculinity and femininity. This study analyzes addiction care practitioners’ constructions of substance use and treatment needs in relation to gender. Data were collected by means of six focus group interviews with 30 addiction care practitioners. An interpretative repertoire of difference emerged, whereby women were constructed as being different from men in psychological, social, and biological respects. The practitioners related to gender in addiction care as an ideological dilemma resulting from the contradictory ideals of on the one hand treating everybody equally and on the other giving special attention to what is regarded as women’s needs. Reflections emerged regarding the need to be aware of one’s own stereotyped assumptions, and also to be attentive toward men’s specific problems, thus constituting a reflective repertoire. In order to avoid potentially stereotyped treatment, the application of a gender-sensitive approach should acknowledge the variety of ways in which femininity and masculinity may be performed.

  • 29.
    Stenius, Kerstin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    “Problematic Intoxications”: Conceptualizing “Abuse” of Illicit Drugs in Postwar Social Treatment Legislation in Finland2012In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 537-564Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes conceptualizations of “drug abuse” in the Finnish postwar parliamentary committees and debates that, in 1961, resulted in the first law for treatment of both alcohol and drug abuse problems. How was the abuse of narcotic drugs viewed as a new problem that merited new solutions? How was abuse of drugs regarded as similar to abuse of alcohol? And how were the conceptual problems solved in this process? The analysis is influenced by theories of conceptual history and focuses on committee reports, parliamentary debates, and postwar research. While abuse of narcotic drugs was a much smaller problem, it was conceived of as more dramatic and, through intoxication, linked to similar social problems as alcohol abuse. The focus on intoxication as a common denominator is shown in the later conceptual development in the substance abuse field in Finland: “päihdehuolto” = care of intoxicant users.

  • 30.
    Stenius, Kerstin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Witbrodt, Jane
    Engdahl, Barbro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Weisner, Constance
    For the marginalized or for the integrated?: A comparative study of addiction treatment systems in Sweden and the U.S.2010In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 37, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article compares the roles of two different addiction treatmentsystems, one in Stockholm county, surrounding the Swedish capital,and the other in a county in Northern California, in relation tomarginalized and socially integrated misusers. It investigates: (a)whether the Swedish treatment system, as suspected, treats moremarginalized clients than the American system, (b) where in the twosystems those with stronger or weaker social ties show up, and (c)what kind of formal and informal pressures the sociallymarginalized and more integrated groups experience.

  • 31.
    Storbjörk, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Events as precipitators to treatment: Important for both well-integrated and marginalized alcohol and drug users of a Swedish treatment system2009In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 36, no 1/2, p. 345-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    "Women and Men in Swedish Alcohol and Drug Treatment" studies how people with alcohol and drug problems come to treatment. The focus is on different alcohol- and drug-related life events in the year prior to treatment and whether or not these events contributed to treatment entry. The importance of these events is also studied in relation to level of marginalization. The representative crosssectional sample includes 1865 clients (71% men) interviewed inperson when entering inpatient and outpatient treatment facilities. Most respondents reported events in the year prior to treatment and these were also perceived as contributors to treatment. Events related to significant others and health workers seem to be of greatest importance for treatment entry. These events happen to a lot of the problematic alcohol and drug users and are viewed as strong contributing factors by the respondents. More marginalized people and misusers with more severe addiction problems experience more events. A curvilinear relationship (somewhat Ushaped) was found between level of marginalization and events as contributors to treatment: the least marginalized people are most likely to report events as contributors, people in between are the least likely and the most marginalized people are likely to report events as contributors to treatment, given that they have experienced the event.

  • 32.
    Storbjörk, Jessica
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The interplay between perceived self-choice and reported informal, formal and legal pressures in treatment entry2006In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 611-643Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on the interplay between reported informal, formal and legal pressure and self-choice in treatment entry. The representative sample of those entering treatment for alcohol or drugs problems in Stockholm County, Sweden includes 1865 clients (71% men). Most respondents reported that it was their own idea to come to treatment (81%). It was also common to report reasons for entering treatment indicating different forms of perceived pressures, especially informal pressures (75%), but also formal and legal pressures. Informal pressure from someone close was a particularly important reason for treatment entry. Informal pressure was found to be positively associated with the feeling of self-choice in treatment entry, whereas perceptions of formal pressure (and particularly legal pressure) mainly were negatively related to self-choice. Most of those reporting self-choice in treatment entry also reported informal, formal, or legal pressure as reasons for coming to treatment.

  • 33.
    Trolldal, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Availability and sales of alcohol in four Canadian provinces: A time-series analysis2005In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34. Wilkinson, C.
    et al.
    Room, Robin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Alcohol and Violence: Relationships, Causality, and Policy2011In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 185-190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An introduction to the topics discussed within the issue is presented, including an article on the relationship between binge drinking and assault among young people in England and Wales, another article on the influence of setting where people drink the most, and another article on the expected effects of alcohol on aggression in the context of alcohol-related violence.

  • 35.
    Winter, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Coproduction of Scientific Addiction Knowledge in Everyday Discourse2016In: Contemporary Drug Problems, ISSN 0091-4509, E-ISSN 2163-1808, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 25-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The phenomenon of addiction enables studies of how society governs citizens and produces (healthy) bodies through classifications and definitions within treatment, science, and politics. Definitions and explanations of addiction change over time, and collective narratives of addiction in society are shared between scientific, official, and colloquial discourses. It is thus reasonable to argue that scientists, clinicians, and practitioners, as well as politicians, journalists, and laypersons, co-create addiction as a (bio)medical, social, and cultural phenomenon defined by varying actions, experiences, contexts, and meanings. The mass media is a key link between science and citizens. Explanations and definitions of the nature and causes of, and solutions for, addiction are provided by science and communicated to the rest of the society in popular scientific representations. While the language of scientific discourse is actively used, reproduced, and redefined in everyday language, laypersons are seldom acknowledged as active participants in studies of knowledge coproduction. This study examines how 25 newspaper readers interpret and explain dimensions of addiction phenomena through their own knowledge and interpretation of scientific representations in the media. The analysis shows how (popular) scientific biomedical addiction discourse interacts with newspaper readers’ interpretations, focusing on lay discussion of the causes of and solutions for addiction, how lay coproduction of scientific explanations is made, and how we can understand it. The study contributes to our understanding of the complex network of interacting and competing actors coproducing knowledge of addiction, emphasizing laypersons’ involvement in this process.

1 - 35 of 35
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