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  • 1.
    Kotova, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute. The Swedish National Food Agency, Sweden.
    Frostne, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Abramsson-Zetterberg, Lilianne
    Tareke, Eden
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Bergman, Rolf
    Haghdoost, Siamak
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Paulsson, Birgit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Materials and Environmental Chemistry (MMK).
    Segerbäck, Dan
    Jenssen, Dag
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Molecular Biosciences, The Wenner-Gren Institute.
    Grawé, Jan
    Differences in micronucleus frequency and acrylamide adduct levels with hemoglobin between vegetarians and non-vegetarians2015In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 54, no 7, p. 1181-1190Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrients and food constituents can prevent or contribute to genotoxicity. In this study, the possible influence of a vegetarian/non-vegetarian diet on genotoxic effects was investigated in 58 non-smoking healthy vegetarians (V) and non-vegetarians (NV), age 21-37 years from the Stockholm area in Sweden. Physical activity and dietary habits were similar in both groups, with the exception of the intake of meat and fish. Using flow cytometry, we determined the formation of micronuclei (MN) in transferrin-positive immature peripheral blood reticulocytes (Trf-Ret) (Total: n = 53; V: n = 27; NV: n = 26). Dietary exposure to acrylamide was measured through hemoglobin (Hb) adducts in peripheral erythrocytes (Total: n = 53; V: n = 29; NV: n = 24). Hb adducts of both acrylamide and its genotoxic metabolite glycidamide were monitored as a measure of the corresponding in vivo doses. Our data demonstrated that compared with the non-vegetarians, the vegetarians exhibited lower frequencies of MN (fMN) in the Trf-Ret (p < 0.01, Student's t test). A multivariate analysis demonstrated that there was no association between the fMN and factors such as age, sex, intake of vitamins/minerals, serum folic acid and vitamin B12 levels, physical activity, and body mass index. The mean Hb adduct levels of acrylamide and glycidamide showed no significant differences between vegetarians and non-vegetarians. Furthermore, there were no significant relationships between the adduct levels and fMN in the individuals. The ratio of the Hb adduct levels from glycidamide and acrylamide, however, showed a significant difference (p < 0.04) between the two groups. These data suggest that the vegetarian diet might be beneficial in lowering genomic instability in healthy individuals. The measured Hb adduct levels indicate that the total intake of acrylamide does not differ between the two studied groups and does not contribute to the observed difference in fMN, although an influence of the diet on the metabolic rates of acrylamide was indicated. In addition, the observed significant difference in the background fMN in the two groups demonstrated that the MN analysis method has a sensitivity applicable to the biomonitoring of human lifestyle factors.

  • 2. Ma, Fei
    et al.
    Li, Qing
    Zhou, Xuan
    Zhao, Jiangang
    Song, Aili
    Li, Wen
    Liu, Huan
    Xu, Weili
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Aging Research Center (ARC), (together with KI). Tianjin Medical University, China.
    Huang, Guowei
    Effects of folic acid supplementation on cognitive function and A-related biomarkers in mild cognitive impairment: a randomized controlled trial2019In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 345-356Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. O'Callaghan-Gordo, Cristina
    et al.
    Kogevinas, Manolis
    Pedersen, Marie
    Fthenou, Eleni
    Espinosa, Ana
    Tsiapa, Xristina
    Chalkiadaki, Georgia
    Daraki, Vasiliki
    Dermitzaki, Eirini
    Decordier, Ilse
    Farmer, Peter B.
    Georgiadis, Panagiotis
    Georgiou, Vaggelis
    Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A.
    Merlo, Domenico Franco
    Romaguera, Dora
    Roumeliotaki, Theano
    Sarri, Katerina
    Törnqvist, Margareta
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Vande Loock, Kim
    von Stedingk, Hans
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Department of Environmental Science and Analytical Chemistry.
    Kleinjans, Jos
    Kirsch-Volders, Micheline
    Chatzi, Leda
    Maternal diet during pregnancy and micronuclei frequency in peripheral blood T lymphocytes in mothers and newborns (Rhea cohort, Crete)2018In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 57, no 1, p. 209-218Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose The study assessed whether diet and adherence to cancer prevention guidelines during pregnancy were associated with micronucleus (MN) frequency in mothers and newborns. MN is biomarkers of early genetic effects that have been associated with cancer risk in adults. Methods A total of 188 mothers and 200 newborns from the Rhea cohort (Greece) were included in the study. At early-mid pregnancy, we conducted personal interviews and a validated food frequency questionnaire was completed. With this information, we constructed a score reflecting adherence to the World Cancer Research Fund/American Institute for Cancer Research cancer prevention guidelines on diet, physical activity and body fatness. At delivery, maternal and/or cord blood was collected to measure DNA and hemoglobin adducts of dietary origin and frequencies of MN in binucleated and mononucleated T lymphocytes (MNBN and MNMONO). Results In mothers, higher levels of red meat consumption were associated with increased MNBN frequency [2nd tertile IRR = 1.34 (1.00, 1.80), 3rd tertile IRR = 1.33 (0.96, 1.85)] and MNMONO frequency [2nd tertile IRR = 1.53 (0.84, 2.77), 3rd tertile IRR = 2.69 (1.44, 5.05)]. The opposite trend was observed for MNBN in newborns [2nd tertile IRR = 0.64 (0.44, 0.94), 3rd tertile IRR = 0.68 (0.46, 1.01)], and no association was observed with MNMONO. Increased MN frequency in pregnant women with high red meat consumption is consistent with previous knowledge. Conclusions Our results also suggest exposure to genotoxics during pregnancy might affect differently mothers and newborns. The predictive value of MN as biomarker for childhood cancer, rather than adulthood, remains unclear. With few exceptions, the association between maternal carcinogenic exposures during pregnancy and childhood cancer or early biologic effect biomarkers remains poorly understood.

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