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  • 1.
    Barclay, Kieron J.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    SEX COMPOSITION OF THE WORKPLACE AND MORTALITY RISK2013In: Journal of Biosocial Science, ISSN 0021-9320, E-ISSN 1469-7599, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 807-821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study uses Swedish occupational register data to examine whether the proportion of men in administrative workplaces in the Swedish public service affects all-cause mortality risks amongst both males and females of working age. Using piecewise constant survival models to analyse occupational data from the Swedish administrative registers from 1995 to 2007, it was found that for males, a 1% increase in the proportion of males was associated with a 1.3% increase in mortality risk (hazard ratio, HR 1.013, 95% CI 1.007-1.020, p < 0.001), but no association was found for females (HR 1.004, 95% CI 0.996-1.012, p = 0.297). Adjustments were made for age, family status, education, occupational status, occupational segregation by sex, the total number of individuals in the workplace, level of government, region, period and variables reflecting the workplace structure by age, age by sex, occupation and education. A higher proportion of males may be related to (i) an increased exposure to risky health behaviours such as alcohol consumption and unhealthy dietary patterns, (ii) a tendency towards sickness presenteeism, and (iii) an increase in the levels of several well-established emotional stressors in the workplace, leading to an increased level of psychosocial stress. The findings and potential extensions of this research are discussed.

  • 2.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Effects of the fertility transition on birth seasonality in the Netherlands2008In: Journal of Biosocial Science, ISSN 0021-9320, E-ISSN 1469-7599, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 655-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Synchronous with the decline in fertility that took place in the post-war period in the Netherlands, patterns of birth seasonality changed as well. In this paper seasonal fluctuations in fertility in the Netherlands are examined using population register data for the period 1952 to 2005. The peak in births has changed from spring to summer and subsequently to August/September, thereby shifting from the European to the American pattern. The seasonal shift can be attributed to parity-specific changes. Before the transition, birth seasonality did not differ much between the different parities. In the transition period from higher to low fertility, differences between parities increased which persist up to today. At present, the overall seasonality pattern is determined by first births. Moreover, birth seasonality varies by maternal age. The findings stimulate the discussion on the role of planning as a cause of birth seasonality.

  • 3.
    Kolk, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sociology.
    Schnettler, Sebastian
    Parental Status and Gender Preferences for Children: is Differential Fertility Stopping Consistent with the Trivers-Willard Hypothesis?2013In: Journal of Biosocial Science, ISSN 0021-9320, E-ISSN 1469-7599, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 683-704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on evolutionary reasoning, Trivers & Willard (1973) predicted status-biased sex composition and parental investment with son-preferencing effects in higher, and daughter-preferencing effects in lower status groups. Previous research shows mixed results. This study uses event-history methods and Swedish register data to study one possible mechanism in isolation: do parents in different status groups vary in their proclivities to continue fertility based on the sex composition of previous offspring? The results show no support for the Trivers-Willard hypothesis on a wide range of different status indicators. Future research on the stated hypothesis should focus on physiological rather than behavioural mechanisms.

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