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  • 1.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Harvests and grain prices in Sweden 1665-18702012In: Agricultural History Review, ISSN 0002-1490, Vol. 60, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the impact of harvests and international markets on Swedish grain prices, 1665-1870. The paper finds that harvests at a national level had a greater impact on domestic grain prices than international grain prices. However, at a regional level, grain prices tended to be affected more by harvests outside the region. Furthermore, in the long term, foreign prices became a more important determinant of national grain prices. The conclusion is that, under certain circumstances, grain prices can be used as an indicator of harvest fluctuations and to construct historical national accounts, at least at a sufficiently aggregated level. Such an endeavour needs to be combined with a careful analysis of the impact of prices in the surrounding area.

  • 2. Lennartsson, Tommy
    et al.
    Westin, Anna
    Erikson, Marja
    Flygare, Iréne A.
    Isacson, Maths
    Morell, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Between nature and society: the interpretation of an early 19th century Swedish farmer's diary2015In: Agricultural History Review, ISSN 0002-1490, Vol. 63, no 2, p. 265-285Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Myrdal, Janken
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Sapoznik, Alexandra
    Technology, labour, and productivity potential in peasant agriculture: England, c.1000 to 13482017In: Agricultural History Review, ISSN 0002-1490, Vol. 65, p. 194-212Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The period between the eleventh and fourteenth centuries was one of rising population and increasing pressure on land and resources. Access to land per person and per household declined as peasant arable holdings were fragmented to make room for this growing population, and an increasing proportion of the population was left reliant on smallholdings from which to earn a living. How so many people were able to live off of so little land is a crucial problem in our understanding of the high and late medieval economy. Through examination of illuminated manuscripts, religious iconography, archaeological findings and written records, we identify a series of agricultural techniques, well suited to the growing number smallholding peasants, and argue that peasants were able to achieve high levels of land productivity through the labour-intensive use of small-scale technologies.

  • 4. Robson, Elly
    et al.
    Costello, Eugene
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Morgan, John
    Roundtable: environmental histories of agriculture in early modern Britain and Ireland2023In: Agricultural History Review, ISSN 0002-1490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this roundtable, three early-career historians discuss relationships between early modern agricultural and environmental history in Britain and Ireland. The discussion focuses on how the growing field of environmental history can both contribute to and ask new questions of agricultural history, particularly through an attention to each subdiscipline’s history, sources, methods and key debates. Britain and Ireland provide the geographical focus due to their rich traditions of early modern agricultural history, which contrast with the relatively recent development of early modern environmental histories of the region. The contributors bring their varied disciplinary training in environmental, social and intellectual history and archaeology to bear on questions that trace and blur the boundaries of environmental and agricultural history and offer fresh perspectives on their future intersections.

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  • 5. Skoglund, Martin Karl
    Farming at the Margin: Climatic Impacts on Harvest Yields and Agricultural Practices in Central Scandinavia, c.1560‐19202023In: Agricultural History Review, ISSN 0002-1490, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 203-233Article in journal (Refereed)
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