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  • 1.
    Arnberg, Klara
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Ekonomisk-historiska institutionen.
    Under the Counter, Under the Radar?: The Business and Regulation of the Pornographic Press in Sweden 1950-19712012Ingår i: Enterprise & society, ISSN 1467-2227, E-ISSN 1467-2235, Vol. 13, nr 2, s. 350-377Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the process leading to decriminalization of pornography in Sweden in 1971 is analyzed. The interplay between the structural institutional level and company behavior is stressed, with an emphasis on business strategies. The article shows that the division between hard-core and soft-core pornographic magazines in Sweden was quite different than the development in the United Kingdom and the United States. It also shows how the business strategies used by hard-core pornographers challenged the obscenity legislation and regulation of national distribution, making them obsolete. Even though there was fierce competition between the pornography companies, producers formed joint alternative distribution channels crucial to the survival of the industry.

  • 2.
    Arnberg, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekonomisk historia och internationella relationer.
    Gustavsson, Martin
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Socialantropologiska institutionen, Stockholms centrum för forskning om offentlig sektor (SCORE). Stockholm School of Economics, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tamm Hallström, Kristina
    Under the Influence of Commercial Values: Neoliberalized Business-Consumer Relations in the Swedish Certification Market, 1988-20182023Ingår i: Enterprise & society, ISSN 1467-2227, E-ISSN 1467-2235, Vol. 24, nr 3, s. 647-675Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the 1990s, a new model for market control organized through tripartite standards regimes (TSR), has expanded globally and affected most market exchanges through standard-setting, accreditation, and certification. This article investigates business-consumer relations under this regime, with a specific focus on the functions of accreditation and certification. In our case study of Sweden, a new picture of consumer protection under late capitalism evolves. Seeing it as a form of neoliberalization, the article uncovers a transition between two regimes of control; from one built on a potential conflict between consumer and business interests, to one based on the assumption that business interests are beneficial for all parties. Although business interest was formulated as pleasing the consumer-or the customer-by both certification firms and the Swedish Accreditation Authority, in practice consumer interest as something worth protecting was made abstract in the era of the TSR.

  • 3.
    Arnberg, Klara
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekonomisk historia och internationella relationer.
    Hagström, Jim
    Wartime segmentation: Class, gender, and nation in the marketing of consumers, Sweden 1939–19452024Ingår i: Enterprise & society, ISSN 1467-2227, E-ISSN 1467-2235, s. 1-32Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    In line with recent research that regards the Second World War as a “defining moment” rather than a temporary disruption to the development of consumer societies, this paper explores how consumers were imagined in nonbelligerent Sweden. The main empirical source material consists of business-to-business advertisements from newspaper and magazine publishers aimed at potential advertisers. There, publishers portrayed their readers as suitable consumers, and, given that the division of the press constituted the main infrastructure for reaching different consumer groups, this is interpreted as a key to understanding market segmentation processes. The findings show how geographical, demographic, and psychological factors were considered in optimizing advertising influence and reaching classed and gendered target audiences. Although the segmentation process consolidated during the war, focusing on stable, large consumer groups, the imagined consumer also underwent fundamental changes, combating anxiety and despair through dreams of both future and present patriotic consumption.

  • 4.
    Åström Rudberg, Elin
    Stockholms universitet, Samhällsvetenskapliga fakulteten, Institutionen för ekonomisk historia och internationella relationer. Department of Economic History, Uppsala University.
    Doing Business in the Schools of the Welfare State: Competing “Entrepreneurial Selves” and the Roots of Entrepreneurship Education in 1980s Sweden2023Ingår i: Enterprise & society, ISSN 1467-2227, E-ISSN 1467-2235, Vol. 24, nr 4, s. 1066-1092Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This article concerns the rise of young entrepreneurship education programs in 1980s Sweden, which entered schools surprisingly early and quickly, backed by organized Swedish business. The increased popularity of entrepreneurship education toward the end of the twentieth century in many European welfare states is usually associated with a shift toward neoliberal, market-oriented, policies. It is argued here that an important reason for young entrepreneurship’s success was its ability to connect with the Swedish tradition of cooperation and democratic decision making, in combination with values such as individualism and competition. A case in point is the surprising compatibility between progressive pedagogical ideas and “neoliberal” entrepreneurialism. The article is based on a study of Ung Företagsamhet (Young Entrepreneurship, henceforth UF), the Swedish version of the American organization Junior Achievement, and the ambition of the consumer cooperative movement’s think tank, Koopi, to offer a different kind of entrepreneurship education. In the analysis, the concept of “the entrepreneurial self” is applied to these two different programs, and the results show how they clashed, but also overlapped, in ways that help explain the success of UF. The article is a contribution to our understanding of how entrepreneurship discourse emerged and manifested itself in everyday environments in the late twentieth century, and as such also contributes to the history of Nordic neoliberalism.

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