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  • 1.
    Ahlbäck, Anders
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Changing views on gender and security: Finland's belated opening of military service to women in the 1990s2022In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 248-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article studies the historical shift in societal understandings of gender and security in Finland that led to the introduction of women's voluntary military service and the opening of the military professions to women in 1995. With a focus on how the gendered division of defence and military labour was conceptualized at various stages, the study analyses what caused Finland to lag behind its Scandinavian neighbours in this respect, and what caused a sweeping reform process to come about in the early 1990s. Drawing on press materials, parliamentary records and policymaking documents, it traces public debates and policymaking over two decades. It shows that women's defence work was a controversial issue, for both historical and political reasons. This caused an emphasis being placed on women's non-military tasks within a broad understanding of societal security during the 1980s. Around the end of the Cold War, a surge of neo-patriotism coincided with the normalization of formal gender equality to effect a significant shift in notions of female citizenship towards military participation. Positive Scandinavian examples of women's military integration were decisive at this point, as was the political impact of Finland acquiring its first female minister of defence.

  • 2.
    Al Fakir, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    ‘Rise up and walk!’ The Church of Sweden and the ‘problem of vagrancy’ in the early twentieth century2022In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, ISSN 0346-8755, Vol. 47, p. 156-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article examines how people within the Church of Sweden’s leadership tried to solve ‘the problem of vagrancy’ in Sweden in the early twentieth century. In focus are the priest John Melander and the deacon Josef Flinth, who advocated and realized various activities for categories of poor and mobile men in the population. These interventions, defined as help-to-self-help, differentiated between the ‘worthy’ and the ‘unworthy’ needy. In publications and lectures, Melander and Flinth presented arguments to transfer ‘unworthy’ categories to the ‘worthy’, thereby expanding the community of value. This expansion was conditioned, however, by boundaries drawn regarding ideas on belonging and ethnicity. Working in the borderlands of the community as part of a Christian calling, Melander and Flinth contributed to the expansion of social work in the early twentieth century.

  • 3. Aunesluoma, Juhana
    et al.
    Petersson, Magnus
    Silva, Charles
    Stockholm University.
    Deterrence or reassurance?: Nordic responses to the First Detente, 1953-19562007In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 183-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Historians remember 1953 for the death of Stalin and the ensuing relaxation of East-West tensions, now known as the First Detente. Based on recent Cold War scholarship supplemented by primary documentation, this comparative study looks at the Nordic reaction to the First Wtente 1953-1956 in terms of deterrence and reassurance. The results suggest that, while the Nordic governments uniformly welcomed a more relaxed international atmosphere and entertained hopes of genuine dialogue between East and West, they Often differed in their interpretations of Soviet motives and the genuineness of the post- Stalin foreign policy. The tendency to put added emphasis on reassurance (end hence less deterrence) was most apparent in the cases of Iceland and Finland. Danish and Swedish policy shared this tendency, but lacked the degree of consensus found in Iceland. Norway seems to have been the least amenable to a change in perspective. The course of the First Detente led to an even stronger emphasis on reassurance than had been the case previously. In all of the Nordic countries the invasion of Hungary had a similar alarming effect - it swung the pendulum back toward misgivings about Soviet intentions.

  • 4.
    Bergqvist, Kim
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Denmark and Europe in the Middle Ages, c.1000–1525: essays in honour of Professor Michael H. Gelting2015In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 678-683Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Biltekin, Nevra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Migrating Women and Transnational Relations: Swedish-American Connections since the 1920s2021In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 531-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the ways in which Swedish and Swedish-American women in the United States have maintained transnational connections with Sweden. Empirically, the article details the organizational profiles and activities of two associations: the American Daughters of Sweden, founded in 1926, and the Swedish Women’s Educational Association, formed in 1979. By studying the post-mass migration period, the article provides new insight into an era that has received little attention in Swedish-American scholarship. The study shows that women actively engaged in, and vigorously nurtured cultural, social and business-related contacts with Sweden. By establishing these transnational connections, women became prominent actors in upholding and redefining Swedish-American relations.

  • 6.
    Bjarne Larsson, Gabriela
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Wives or Widows and their Representatives2012In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 49-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The main purpose of this article is to scrutinize the opportunities married women had to administer their inheritance and reversions compared to widows' opportunities to administer their inheritance, dower and share from the former marriage. It has been claimed that medieval women had to wait until they were widowed to take charge over their own property. In this article I challenge this view. I argue that a noble woman's opportunities to act independently depended on the origins of the property she wanted to sell, and if male representatives from that family laid claim to the land or not.

    I investigate all written transactions carried out by freeholders and transactions carried out by noble families in two different regions in present-day Sweden during the period from 1300 to 1500. I establish in what type of transactions the women stood as sole executors in the charters, and if they were named as wives or as widows. I also investigate if they participated in varied forms of transactions when widowed compared to when they were in marriage.

    The principal result is that the wife of a freeholder did not execute deeds herself. This was done by her husband or, when she was young, by her brother. It was extremely rare that a woman of this status administered her inheritance herself, due to the stronger pre-emptive rights for men besides the brother in Jämtland. As wealthy widows, however, women in this position sometimes executed deeds, presumably because their brothers were dead. Noble women administered their property more frequently. Their pre-emptive rights were stronger and they therefore had more property to dispose of. In the absence of men from the noble family from where the land originated, noble women could act independently, irrespective of if they were widows or wives.

  • 7. Cederqvist, Johan
    et al.
    Lidström, Susanna
    Sörlin, Sverker
    Svedäng, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Science, Stockholm University Baltic Sea Centre. Gothenburg University, Sweden .
    Swedish environmental history of the Baltic Sea: a review of current knowledge and perspectives for the future2020In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 663-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Western culture, oceans have traditionally been perceived as timeless, separate from society and practically boundless in resources and absorptive capacity. As a result, the entangled histories of people and marine environments have largely been neglected in historical research. This is changing with the development of marine environmental history together with increasing recognition of oceans’ vulnerability and importance in earth systems. Against this background, we review the current state of historical knowledge of how different actors within Swedish society have perceived and impacted the Baltic Sea environment, as well as discovered and responded to marine environmental change. We find that this environmental history, as distinct from other forms of historical research, has so far received limited attention. While the environmental histories of terrestrial resources in Sweden – including forests, agriculture, minerals and energy – have been thoroughly studied, there is little comparative knowledge about the formation and development of the major scientific institutions and public agencies involved in Baltic Sea governance. In light of this, we discuss how knowledge about Sweden’s marine environmental history can be improved, and the importance this may have for the future sustainability of the Baltic Sea.

  • 8.
    Edvinsson, Rodney
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Major recessions in Sweden 1850–2000: From pre-capitalist to modern types of crises2010In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 403-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses historical national accounts to compare major recessions in Sweden from 1850 to 2000. A major recession is defined as an event when the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) in one year is below the level two years earlier. The sharpest declines in GDP coincided with the World Wars, crop failures and contractionary economic policies. One important distinction to be made is between pre-capitalist and modern types of crises. While the former were crises of underproduction, brought about by declines in agriculture and consumption, the latter were overproduction crises usually generated by declines in investment and industrial production. The article shows that in Sweden the transition from the one type to the other was a prolonged process.

  • 9.
    Frohnert, Pär
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    [Recension av: Sundberg, Kerstin: Stat, stormakt och säterier]: agrarekonomisk utveckling och social integration i Östersjöområdet2003In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 63-65Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Glete, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The Kreuger Group and the crisis on the Swedish stock market1978In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 251-272Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Glover, Nikolas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Imaging Community: Sweden in cultural propaganda then and now2009In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 246-263Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses the dynamic interplay between autostereotypes and xenostereotypes in the historical context of the Swedish Institute, the government agency responsible for Swedish cultural relations with other countries. More specifically it suggests empirical examples of how “national image” and “imagining the national” have infused one another in the post-war world. Drawing on the archives and publications of the Swedish Institute as well as the archives of the Press Department of the Swedish Ministry for Foreign Affairs, the article’s chronological emphasis lies on the late 1940s. Using this historical perspective, it concludes with some reflections on the Institute’s current Nation Branding strategies.

  • 12.
    Glover, Nikolas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Visions and Versions of Modern Sweden: Recent Theses on Swedish National Identities2008In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 33, no 2, p. 183-190Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    For the Wealth of the Realm: the transformation of the public sphere in Swedish politics, c. 1434-16502012In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 557-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the transformation of the representative public in late-medieval and early modern Sweden. While recognizing the importance of Habermas’s theory of the public sphere, the focus is on the progressive character of the royal administration and on how the interaction within the administrative setting eventually came to serve as a basis for political opinion. The interplay between local bargaining over taxes and political action at the national level is of critical importance. The state formation process served to empower new groups like peasants and burghers, who eventually learned how to wield rational arguments in order to defend their interests. This is demonstrated by here by focusing on the interaction between local officeholders and the tax-paying peasantry.

  • 14.
    Hallenberg, Mats
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Holm, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Johansson, Dan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Organization, Legitimation, Participation: State formation as a dynamic process - the Swedish example, c. 1523-16802008In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 247-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article suggests a new interpretation of the state formation process in Early Modern Sweden, focusing on three dimensions: The organization of the state as a way to use limited resources in a rational way, the legitimation of rulers in terms of beliefs and values current in society, and the participation of the subjects in state activities. Our model focuses on institutional change as a result of the intensity of interaction between rulers and subjects. Based on our own research, claims are made for new understanding of state formation in Europe that allows more room for political action from below.

  • 15.
    Heuman, Johannes
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Recension av: Schult, Tanja: A hero's many faces2010In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 223-225Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16. Huhtamaa, Heli
    et al.
    Charpentier Ljungqvist, Fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Swedish Collegium for Advanced Study, Sweden.
    Climate in Nordic historical research - a research review and future perspectives2021In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 46, no 5, p. 665-695Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article assesses the development and current state of climate history research conducted in the five Nordic countries and Estonia. The possible societal impacts of past climatic changes already interested a handful of Nordic historians in the early twentieth century, but the lack of data on past climate fluctuations constrained scholarship in this field until recently. The data availability has increased fundamentally over the past decades due to the advances of palaeoclimatology. However, these advances have created new challenges, related to the ability to utilize data from the natural sciences in historical research as well as acquiring a basic knowledge on climatology. In many European countries, climate history has established itself as a strong academic subfield and consequently has created approaches as to how to overcome some main pitfalls, like climate determinism, related to the early works in the field. These epistemological advances are just beginning to gain a foothold in Nordic historical research. Thus, the article concludes with ten recommendations to improve future research in Nordic climate history.

  • 17.
    Ikegami, Masako
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    THE END OF A NATIONAL' DEFENCE INDUSTRY?: Impacts of globalization on the Swedish defence industry2013In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 436-457Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the author scrutinizes the impacts of globalization on the Swedish national defence industry prompted by the end of the Cold War through the 1990s. Through analysing the data from international, Swedish government and industrial sources, the author establishes that the Swedish defence industry, due to its overreliance on arms exports as a result of post-Cold War globalization, has become increasingly irrelevant to Swedish defence needs. We may see the end of a national' defence industry in the Swedish case. The author further argues that overreliance on arms exports to extra-European markets leads to the erosion of Swedish national security and Swedish defence readiness. The author concludes that multinational business-interest analysis is needed to generate a closer examination of the export-oriented Swedish defence industry in the context of globalization.

  • 18.
    Jakobsson, Håkan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The Warship in Swedish Seventeenth-Century Society - A Cultural Construction?1999In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 24, no 3-4, p. 225-243Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19. Kristjánsdóttir, Steinunn
    et al.
    Larsson, Inger
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Åsen, Per Arvid
    The Icelandic medieval monastic garden - did it exist?2014In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 560-579Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the multidisciplinary project presented here, 12 known monastic grounds in Iceland were surveyed by a group of medievalists from different fields in the summers of 2009, 2010 and 2011. The aim of the survey was to increase knowledge of the Icelandic monastic garden and of the plants that were known and used there; to look for possible medieval cultural relict plants; to observe continental influence on the island; and to vitalize discussion and research. Landscape and plants were surveyed at the 12 monastic sites, and full botanical investigations made. Many of the plants found have a medieval past as medicinal and utility plants, and some of their properties may have been common knowledge to medieval Icelanders. An investigation of written sources and archaeological and archaeobotanical findings from excavated sites added to the investigators’ knowledge. So were there monastic gardens in Iceland in the Middle Ages? The answer is a rather confident yes. With all the evidence combined, the investigators were able to trace the deliberate use of medicinal, food and utility plants in the monastic contexts. Whether they were cultivated, tended in situ, gathered growing wild or imported is another matter. Continental influence was more evident than has previously been observed.

  • 20.
    Linnarsson, Magnus
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Postal service on a lease contract: the privatization and outsourcing of the Swedish postal service, 1662–16682012In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 296-316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the privatization of the Swedish postal service in the 1660s. In 1663 the Swedish state signed a lease contract for the management of the kingdom's postal service, handing over the leadership of the post to the nobleman Johan von Beijer. The purpose of this article is to show how the early modern Swedish state used private alternatives in executing its undertakings. An analysis of Johan von Beijer's lease contract will serve as an illuminating example of what such a private alternative might be. In order to answer the question of what influenced the choice of organization form, transaction cost theory is applied. Based on the analysis of the contract, and the negotiations between Beijer and the state, this article is able to complement and show the nuances of how the early modern Swedish state functioned in practice.

  • 21.
    Makko, Aryo
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Multilateralism and the Shaping of an 'Active Foreign Policy': Sweden during the preparatory phase of the CSCE2010In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 310-329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with the early reactions of Swedish decision-makers and diplomats on the idea and preparations for the convocation of the Conference on Security and Cooperation inEurope (CSCE), mainly during the years 1969–1971. On the basis of recently declassifieddiplomatic sources from the archive of the Swedish Foreign Ministry, the study outlines therole of Swedish diplomacy in the preparatory phase of the security conference as part of thewider context of European Neutrality during détente. It is the very first contribution to the historiography of the Helsinki process based on Swedish archival material, and suggeststhat the picture of Sweden’s widely mentioned active foreign policy at that time should befurther scrutinized. It also sheds new light on the paradox between Swedish involvement inEuropean and global politics.

  • 22.
    Malmberg, Bo
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Sommestad, Lena
    The hidden pulse of history: Age transition and economic change in Sweden, 1820-20002000In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 25, no 1-2, p. 131-146Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 23.
    Malmer, Elin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Sidenvall, Erik
    Lunds universitet, Teologiska institutionen.
    Christian Manliness for Women?: Contradictions of Christian youth organization in early 20th-century Sweden2009In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 394-413Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Monié-Nordin, Jonas
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Archaeology and Classical Studies.
    Olofsson, Sven
    Voices of the forests: Eviction, control, and the birth of the ‘Parish Lapp’ system in early modern Sweden2023In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 401-426Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the birth of the exploitative sockenlappssystemet (the ‘Parish Lapp’ system) in central Sweden during the early eighteenth century. Based on a foundation of control and eviction instituted in earlier laws, the 1720s saw a forceful rise in royal concern over the existence of nomadic Sámi in central Sweden. His Majesty King Fredrik I specifically expressed fear of damage to the resources of the forests through Sámi hunting, especially bird hunting. The period between 1720 and 1730 saw King Fredrik corresponding with the Royal Council, the county governors, and some groups of Sámi agents. The council sought to evict the Sámi and move them or have them move to the lappmarker. The Sámi agents claimed birth right and asserted that Sámi in central Sweden had no relationship to either the land or the Sámi in the northern part of the realm. This paper uses a historical anthropological perspective, based on a wide set of sources, including historical archaeology, history, and ethnography, in order to paint a bigger picture of the conflicted situation that led to the founding of the unique system of forced indenture: the so-called Parish Lapp system.

  • 25.
    Nordlund Edvinsson, Therese
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Servants and Bourgeois Life in Urban Sweden in the Early Twentieth Century2010In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 35, no 4, p. 427-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By 1900, most Swedish servants had a rural background. They had migrated to the city from the countryside to perform domestic service in private households. Here they met bourgeois ideals of the comfortable home where the masters could demand home-cooked meals, clean clothes and pleasant surroundings. Servants were needed in order to fulfil this ideal. Yet, the number of domestic servants declined strongly in urban Sweden during the first half of the Twentieth Century. This development is often called ‘the servant crisis’. We explore the background to the scarcity of servants, the relationships between masters and servants, and the role of servants in creating economic and cultural distinctions. We analyze the various adaptations of bourgeois households to the decline of domestic servants. Qualitative sources from private letters, diaries and autobiographies are combined with quantitative evidence from censuses.

  • 26.
    Nordquist, Margaretha
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Celebrating the Memory of Victory: Tracing the Memories of the Battle of Brunkeberg (1471)2020In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 121-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates different, but partly overlapping, memorializing processes linked to the Battle of Brunkeberg (1471). In the decades after the battle, memories of the battle not only served to construct the event as a narrative of victory that reinforced notions of legitimate power and a Swedish community, but also formed the basis of potentially divisive emotions of fear and anxiety among the people in periods of political turbulence. The analysis of memory as articulations of co-existing, partly contradictory, and selective narratives and symbolic expressions shows how various memory practices and formats intersect in the political culture and identities of the past.

  • 27. Pinto Costa, Paula
    et al.
    de Fonseca, Luís Adão
    Jensen, Kurt Villads
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Medieval Studies.
    Pimenta, Cristina
    Military Orders Between Territorialization and Periphery from the 12th to the 16th Century: A comparative perspective on Portugal and Denmark2016In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 141-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Military orders have historically played a key role in defining borders, both in a mental sense, by favouring an awareness of alterity in the most peripheral territories (Christians against Muslims and Christians against Pagans), and also in more direct ways, as owners of land in these territories. This article1 discusses both the influence, in the broadest sense, of territory and periphery upon the medieval military orders, and the relationship between the crown and the military orders. It will be done through a comparative historical analysis of two cases: Portugal and Denmark in the 12th–16th centuries. Both countries were placed at the periphery of the Western world in the Middle Ages, and they were both active agents in the Crusading movement.

  • 28.
    Piuva, Katarina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The Meaning of Normality: The controversy about the mental health campaign in Sweden 19692010In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 35, no 2, p. 198-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    At the height of the Swedish welfare society, a campaign with the aim of promoting mental health issues within the Swedish labour market was launched. The title and purpose of the campaign, 'Mental health - an action of increased understanding and solidarity at work', was to illuminate mental health issues at work. Surprisingly to the organizers, the mental health campaign stirred up major opposition, especially from the political left. The idea of mental hygiene in an industrial and workplace setting, a cross-breed between the values of the Human Relations School and psychiatric science, was received with deep mistrust. The campaign caused an agitated debate in the media about power relations between employers and employees. The political disagreements were exposed in a number of articles in the daily newspapers and in the evening papers during the summer of that year. This article undertakes an investigation of the campaign literature and the media debate. The interpretation of the debate highlights different opinions about the meaning of normal mental health. Four different views of normality and mental health which demonstrate the complexity of the issue are presented. Mental health could mean adjustment and harmony, it could be a medical weapon to suppress the working class, it could even mean a neutral state of absence of mental problems, or lastly it could be a claim for the right to live a normal life.

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  • 29.
    Retsö, Dag
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    Söderberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    The late-medieval crisis quantified: Real taxes in Sweden, 1320-15502015In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article aims to assess the size of secular taxes in medieval Sweden in real terms. The size of taxes is calculated as the quantity of butter and the number of oxen that could be bought for a given tax sum. In addition, nominal taxes are converted into grams of silver. Three distinctive periods are discerned: (1) a phase of low taxes 1320–1363; (2) a period of very high taxes from 1363 up to the Engelbrekt uprising in 1434; and (3) a new phase of low taxes up to the mid-16th century. A study of taxes at the regional and national levels makes it possible to evaluate the weight of the main regions of the kingdom (including Finland) in the central fiscal system at the end of the medieval era. A national overview of the situation around 1530 is put forward. During the period of high fiscal pressure in Sweden in the decades around 1400, taxes per taxpayer were much higher than those of England. In the low-tax periods, on the other hand, taxes were insufficient to create a working monopoly of violence. The result was drawn-out conflict between warlords for a large part of the 15th century and well into the 16th century.

  • 30.
    Sennefelt, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Young man, find your fortune: Guilds and the practices of social order in Sweden, 1650-17202019In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 45, no 3, p. 309-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article uses social practices to better understand the interrelations between a social ideology that decried aspiration and the practices of the young men bettering their lot in life when entering the Stockholm guilds. The path into guild membership is investigated regarding the inclusion of would-be members, their social networks, the materiality of documentation and the ideas, symbols and aspirations expressed in the process. The article shows that transition from one social position to another was laden with positive value and symbolism, and that this was underscored with the help of scores of participants apart from the would-be apprentice himself. These young men held a liminal position in society, but one that was understood as largely positive. They were deeply embedded within a local community, but with a direction in life, unmarried, skilled or wanting to acquire skill. While practices of social mobility opened paths for these young men, they also contained social order and the mobility of others.

  • 31.
    Strand, Sanna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    The birth of the enterprising soldier: governing military recruitment and retention in post-Cold War Sweden2022In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 47, no 2, p. 225-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The promise of becoming a normal or even ideal citizen of the nation-state has long been central to the politics of military recruitment and retention. However, what this promise has entailed, and how the image of the soldier has been constructed, varies across time and place. This article illustrates and historicizes the emergence of a distinct soldier image, closely associated with the neoliberal ideal of responsible, active, and entrepreneurial citizenship, in the context of Sweden. The paper adopts a genealogical approach and views ‘the enterprising soldier’ through the contemporary history of military reforms in post-Cold War Sweden. Central to these reforms was the move from universal conscription for men to a recruitment policy that gradually came to rely on voluntarism for all, a shift that culminated in the introduction of an all-volunteer force in 2010. To illustrate the significance and potential appeal of ‘the enterprising soldier’, the paper exemplifies how this image has been promoted and presupposed in three sites: (1) military recruitment materials, (2) military career planning schemes, and (3) military-private sector partnership programmes. Through this genealogical endeavour, this paper contributes new insights into how the image and promise of soldiering has transformed alongside neoliberal reforms of the armed forces.

  • 32.
    Svanberg, Johan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Labour migration and the Swedish labour market model: A case study of recruitment of Yugoslav workers to Svenska Fläktfabriken in Växjö, 1969-19702011In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 91-113Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Tydén, Mattias
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Broberg, Gunnar
    "Introduction": [Theme issue: Scandinavian Eugenics]1999In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 24, no 2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Uppenberg, Carolina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Contracted Coercion: Land, Labour and Gender in the Swedish Crofter Institution2023In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 48, no 5, p. 593-614Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the early modern rural setting, labour was organized with varying degrees of coercion depending on landowning, social standing, and gender. This article analyses the crofter institution, characterized by corvée labour (obligatory work as payment), from the perspective of gender and coercion. The purpose is to answer the question of how the crofter institution was created, shaped, enabled and questioned. The right to establish a croft made the position as head of household available for men but it also increased social stratification. While crofters were masters of their households in contract signing, their position was ambiguous when it came to the organization of labour. Regarding physical integrity, crofters could be forced by physical violence and were subject to rules not connected to work, such as subservience. I argue that this was made acceptable through marriage and allowing the position as head of household to landless men. Crofters held an intermediate position, caught between the market logic of leasehold of land and the coercive logic of labour extraction, and this continued to colour the crofter institution until its final dissolution in 1943.

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