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  • 1.
    Florin, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Heightened Feelings! Emotions as 'Capital' in the Swedish Suffrage Movement2009In: Women's History Review, ISSN 0961-2025, E-ISSN 1747-583X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 181-201Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article deals with six Swedish suffragists who belonged to an informal network in the suffrage organisation and who corresponded over the twenty years that the struggle for the vote took in Sweden,  from 1902 to 1921. The analysis takes place on two levels; on the one hand it deals with the women's description of their emotial experience and on the other with how these feelings were constructed and used in political propaganda as a kind of "capital" - in demonstrations, public meetings or festive occasions. The suffragists on the barricades lived at a time of much drama and many tensions and the period generated powerful feelings that could be utilised in the campaign for the vote.The theoretical framework is Randall Collins model of "interaction rituals" where he argues that feelings are of great importance for social movements in particular.

     

  • 2.
    Kurvinen, Heidi
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History. University of Turku, Finland.
    Women's non-unionised activism in Swedish newsrooms, 1961-892019In: Women's History Review, ISSN 0961-2025, E-ISSN 1747-583XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, the trade union newspaper Journalisten is used to analyse the development of women's non-unionised activism in Swedish newsrooms between 1961 and 1989. By adopting a social movement approach to workplace activism, it is shown that the heyday of women journalists' collective action was in the 1970s. However, individual journalists before and after played a central role in campaigning for change in gendered work cultures, creating a space for feminist consciousness within the profession. Although not all women journalists were feminists, the feminist movement of the late 1960s and 1970s was a source of inspiration for some, giving impetus to non-unionised activism in various newsrooms.

  • 3. Persson, Alma
    et al.
    Sundevall, Fia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History and International Relations.
    Conscripting women: gender, soldiering, and military service in Sweden 1965–20182019In: Women's History Review, ISSN 0961-2025, E-ISSN 1747-583XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how women, men, and gender equality in the military have been debated, made sense of, regulated, and dealt with in Swedish contemporary history. It takes its empirical point of departure in 1965, when the issue of military conscription for women was first raised in Sweden, and ends with the implementation of so called gender-neutral conscription in 2018. The study is based on a wide range of sources, collected through a combination of extensive archival work, ethnographic studies, and interviews. The analysis shows how men have been the standard against which women were measured throughout the period studied. Women service members were simultaneously perceived both as a problem and as a solution to a range of problems in the organisation. Women’s ‘different’ bodies were considered problematic, while staff shortages and demands for specific personnel qualities rendered the ‘woman soldier’ a solution, in particular in relation to international missions.

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