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  • 1.
    Dahlquist, Marina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Media Studies.
    Stockholm Olympics at the Movies2014In: International Journal of the History of Sport, ISSN 0952-3367, E-ISSN 1743-9035, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 588-599Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is a contribution to the special issue on the Olympic Games in Stockholm in 1912 commissioned by Christian Widholm. The text discusses the 1912 Olympics as a major media event with a special focus on the production, distribution and reception of moving pictures

  • 2.
    Edvinsson, Therese Nordlund
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Before the Sunshine: Organising and Promoting the Olympic Games in Stockholm 19122014In: International Journal of the History of Sport, ISSN 0952-3367, E-ISSN 1743-9035, Vol. 31, no 5, p. 563-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1910, two years before the Olympics in Stockholm, The General Secretary of the Swedish Games Mr Kristian Hellstrom assured that the competitors should expect the most exciting time of their lives. As long as they lived, they would remember the sport event. To make the competitors feeling welcomed, it required a successful organisation. The present article examines the promotional work behind the Stockholm Olympics. The event was the first Olympic Games with a professional advertising campaign and an official poster. Initially, the intention was to establish a solid organisation consisting of a specific Advertising and Reception Section. The General Secretariat was in charge of advertising, for instance contacts with the media in Sweden and worldwide. They also organised a specific Advertising and Information Committee' that worked with advertisement. Finally, the promotional work did not only focus on the sport event. The tourism of Sweden was also the object of marketing. This article argues that promotional work on different levels made it possible to modernise and internationalise the event. By analysing Hellstrom's work as General Secretary, it is possible to understand the intensity of promotional activity, which resulted in an innovative campaign.

  • 3.
    Tolvhed, Helena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    The sports woman as a cultural challenge: Swedish popular press coverage of the olympic games during the 1950s and 1960s2012In: International Journal of the History of Sport, ISSN 0952-3367, E-ISSN 1743-9035, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 302-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, popular press coverage of summer and winter Olympic Games in Swedish popular and illustrated magazines during the 1950s and 1960s is analysed as part of a process of everyday affirmation of national and gender identity. First, it is shown how Swedish male athletes are represented in the media as active and forceful male bodies, competing for national honour. The article then moves on to an analysis of representation of female Olympians, and how ‘our’ Swedish girls are discursively linked to a Western, attractive and modern womanhood. In the Cold War context of the 1950s and 1960s, female athletes from Communist states were held out as contrasting examples. Media representation focusing on the good looks and attractiveness of female athletes is read as cultural negotiations of the challenge of women's sport. It is argued that female Olympians were visually and textually represented as women rather than as athletes. This is related to the Swedish historical context, where the female body was a crucial site and symbol for the separation of gendered spheres. The article concludes that the configuration of femininity does not, as in the decades around 1900, refer to biology but rather to social and cultural necessities.

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