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  • 1.
    Berggren, Kalle
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Is everything compatible? A feminist critique of Hearn's composite approach to men and masculinity2018In: Australian feminist studies (Print), ISSN 0816-4649, E-ISSN 1465-3303, Vol. 33, no 97, p. 331-344Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its emergence in the late 1980s, research on men and masculinity has expanded considerably into an established area at the intersection of sociology, gender studies and related disciplines. There is now a wealth of empirical research but the theoretical debates have largely centred on Connell’s notion of hegemonic masculinity. This article focuses instead on the theoretical contribution of Jeff Hearn, arguably one of the central figures within critical studies on men and masculinities over the last few decades. The article identifies the main tenets of Hearn’s theoretical writing and tracks its development over time, and offers a critical discussion of Hearn’s theoretical position. The critique focuses on ambiguous treatments of central concepts and argues that tensions between perspectives such as materialist analysis, queer theory and intersectionality are not fully acknowledged in Hearn’s work.

  • 2.
    Shildrick, Margrit
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    (Micro)chimerism, Immunity and Temporality: Rethinking the Ecology of Life and Death2019In: Australian feminist studies (Print), ISSN 0816-4649, E-ISSN 1465-3303, Vol. 34, no 99, p. 10-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The recent upsurge of interest in the co-articulation of biopolitical and bioethical entanglements underpin both a concern for the putatively temporal thresholds of human life and the very conception of a bounded humanity itself. Taking a step further, I want to suggest that micro(chimerism) as a very specific form of somatic multiplicity, read together with the contemporary rethinking of the concept of immunity, instantiates a fundamental disordering of linear temporality. And that in turn calls for a further reconceptualisation of conventional bioethics. I acknowledge the force of an existing postmodernist bioethics that has attended to the materiality and viscerality of the body and challenged the meaning of human being but, until recently, it has not addressed the bookends of life and death. Once the teleology of the life course is contested, however, death is no longer an insult to being, but merely one event constituting an ongoing vitalism. I propose an atemporal bioethics of coexistence rather than one of successive existence that is faced always with its own finitude.

  • 3.
    Wendt, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    The Politisation of Feminist Research into Men's Violence against Women2012In: Australian feminist studies (Print), ISSN 0816-4649, E-ISSN 1465-3303, Vol. 27, no 71, p. 93-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2001, the first major study of the extent of men's violence against women in Sweden reported that almost every other woman had been exposed to male violence. This article investigates how this feminist-based survey was negotiated by the press and in national politics. The legitimacy of the investigation was undermined in a number of ways, both in the media and in politics. The report was defined as partial and not as reliable as 'conventional' criminological research. The resistance provoked by the investigation is here interpreted as a way of producing nationalistic notions, where 'Swedishness' is recreated as being woman-friendly, just and equal. In Sweden we have come a long way towards gender equality. In some respects-as regards female representation, for instance-we have come further than any other country in the world. Despite this, much remains to be done in a large number of fields. The work is of a long-term nature requiring determination, patience, commitment and not least-knowledge. (Regeringskansliet 2000, 3; emphasis added)

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