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  • 1.
    Alnevall, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies.
    Fortunes of Feminism: From State-Managed Capitalism to Neoliberal Crisis: Fraser's Feminism in Three Acts: Women's Liberation, Identity Politics and Anti-Capitalism2014In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 338-340Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Arnberg, Klara
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Economic History.
    For Men, by Men? Women's Business Activities in the Pornographic Press Compared to the Overall Publishing Industry in Sweden 1950–19722013In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 21-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on women’s business positions in Swedish porn publishing from the 1950s to the 1970s, i.e. when pornography was legalized and when sexually explicit magazines made their commercial breakthrough. The research draws on statistical information on women’s entrepreneurial roles in the overall publishing industry, which is then compared with women’s agency in porn publishing. According to the findings, women seem to have had a slightly more central role in pornography than within the mainstream publishing industry. The analysis is also expanded with details about a few key female pornography entrepreneurs, tracing their publications and business strategies connected to the Freedom of the Press legislation. It is argued that women’s presence in pornographic print and in the overall publishing industry were in fact similar, with a high ratio of family businesses. Women’s entrepreneurship in pornography thus followed a more general historical pattern whereby women engaged in small-scale business with relatively low barriers to entry.

  • 3.
    Bergman, Helena
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    Engwall, Kristina
    Gunnarsson-Östling, Ulrika
    Johannesson, Livia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    What about the Future? The Troubled Relationship between Futures and Feminism2014In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 63-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This position paper argues that issues related to the future are worth emphasizing and discussing with more feminist fervour and engagement than is now the case within feminist studies and futures studies. It is concluded that feminists cannot just be critical from an outside perspective, but must engage in creating alternative futures. These futures should not be common goals around which to unite, but a way to inspire feminist thinking about different futures. The authors point out the problem that the futures studies field lacks feminist perspectives, and in this position paper they discuss the gap between futures studies and feminism.

  • 4.
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Symbolic Gender Boundaries in News Discourse on Psychotropics Use and Drinking: An Analysis of the Swedish Press Debate 2000–20092013In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 57-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychotropics and alcohol are psychoactive substances with different cultural meanings and opposing gender associations. This paper examines the Swedish press debate ongender and psychotropics and compares it with the press debate on gender and alcohol, aiming toidentify the conditions under which gendered moral boundaries of acceptable/unacceptableconsumption are defended. The study shows that boundaries acquire a heightened moral status innews stories (1) that deal with a topic related to cultural ideas about essential gender difference,(2) where the cultural status of the psychoactive substance is linked to selfish and/or hedonisticmotives, and (3) where innocent victims of consumption can be identified. Moreover, it shows thatthe “bad” characters constructed through this moral boundary are portrayed as exhibiting“excessive masculinity” and “insufficient femininity”. On the basis of these findings, it is arguedthat newspaper discourse on psychotropics and alcohol still relies quite heavily on gendered andheteronormative ideas.

  • 5.
    Carlson, Laura
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Law, Department of Law.
    Restraints on Women's Employment in Sweden2001In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 1, no 9, p. 21-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    women, night work, breast feeding, maternity leave, parental leave, maternity pay, parental pay

  • 6.
    Carlson, Åsa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy. University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Sex, Biological Functions and Social Norms: A Simple Constructivist Theory of Sex2016In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Feminist theory needs a constructivist account of biological sex for at least two reasons. The first is that as long as female and male are the only two sexes that are taken for granted, being cisgender, heterosexual, and preferably a parent will be the norm, and being intersexed, transgender, bi- or homosexual, infertile or voluntarily childless will be deemed failure. The second is the fact that, usually, sex and gender come together in the way that is expected, i.e. the fact that most females are women and most males are men needs to be explained. This paper provides a constructivist theory of sex, which is that the sex categories depend on norms of reproduction. I argue that, because the sex categories are defined according to the two functions or causal roles in reproduction, and biological function is a teleological concept involving purposes, goals, and values, female and male are normative categories. As there are no norms or values in nature, normative categories are social constructions; hence, female and male are not natural but social categories. Once we understand that biological normativity is social, biological norms of heterosexuality, fertility, and so on are no longer incontestable. In addition, as many gender norms also concern reproduction-socially mediated reproduction-this simple theory of sex explains the common confluence of sex and gender.

  • 7.
    Fjelkestam, Kristina
    Södertörn University College in Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tale of Transgression: Charlie and the Representation of Female Homosexuality in Interwar Sweden2005In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 9-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The first Swedish novel with a female homosexual protagonist, Charlie, was published in 1932, and this essay focuses on an analysis of three topoi in it, namely “the unveiling of a secret”, “the triangle of desire”, and “the scene at the mirror”. These topoi correspond to prevalent cultural representations of female homosexuality in the interwar period, under the headings of the three Ms: Masculinity, Mothering, and Mirrors, respectively. The main points of reference in the analysis are taken from sexology, psychoanalysis, and Radclyffe Hall's novel The Well of Loneliness, but it is argued that the narrative of Charlie transcends the restraining categories and normative classifications it presents.

  • 8.
    Gemzöe, Lena
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Gender Studies.
    Faux Feminism? A Reply to Mia Linnason’s Position Paper2010In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 18, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Karlsson Minganti, Pia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Ethnology.
    Muslim Women Managing Women's Shelters: Somaya, the Muslimwoman and Religion as Resource2015In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 93-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on Sisters’ Shelter Somaya in Sweden, an organization unique in its claim to be a women’s shelter by and for Muslim women, and in its combining of Islamic and secular feminisms. Examining the organization’s self-presentations, the author argues that there is, however, an ongoing shift from an emphasis on its Muslim profile to a dissolution of the very same. Looking into potential loss in the process (for clients, activists, allies, and feminism at large), the analysis draws on current research on anti-Muslim intolerance and normative secularism. The concept of the “Muslim woman” is employed to illustrate the stereotyping that continuously associates Muslim women with “victims” inhabiting shelters rather than capable “managers”. Intersectionality is pointed at as an emic strategy adopted by Somaya to overcome division, but also critically analysed as a consensus-creating signifier that hinders diversity. Thus,the article raises the increasingly important issue of the relationship between religion, gender, and feminism in the post-secular turn, and the author calls for critical self-reflection and creative affirmation in the interaction with heterogeneous others.

  • 10.
    Kvist, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Peterson, Elin
    Complutense University of Madrid, Spain.
    What Has Gender Equality Got to Do with It? An Analysis of Policy Debates Surrounding Domestic Services in the Welfare States of Spain and Sweden2010In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 185-203Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As more and more political institutions stress the significance of gender equality policies, it becomes important to investigate the different interpretations and meanings attached to the concept of gender equality in diverse policy contexts. In this article we are interested in problematizing visions of gender equality by studying the challenges that the growing amount of paid domestic work performed within European households poses for gender equality policies and practices in two European countries. The aim is to reveal normative assumptions and silences in relation to gender equality by comparing how “paid domestic work” has been framed in policy debates in Sweden and Spain. As welfare states, Sweden and Spain are generally considered to be very different, and in policies on care for children and the elderly the differences are perhaps most apparent. In both countries, however, paid domestic work in the home has become more and more common in the last two decades. The rise of paid domestic services in European households has been interpreted as due to the limitations or decline of welfare states, the ageing populations, and the increasing numbers of dual-earner families. These services are most often provided by women, predominantly of immigrant background, and involve a wide range of tasks, including care work. The phenomenon of an increasing sector of domestic (care) work poses a theoretical and methodological challenge to gender and welfare studies. This article argues that the analysis of debates surrounding domestic service in private households is a useful starting-point for an intersectional analysis by means of revealing the normative assumptions and marginalization embedded in gender equality policies. It uses a comparative frame analysis in combination with intersectional analysis to assess how interactions between gender, class, race, and sexuality have been articulated in the policy debates on domestic services in Spain and Sweden.

  • 11.
    Lindqvist, Anna
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Psychology.
    Gender Categorization of Perfumes: The Difference between Odour Perception and Commercial Classification2013In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 218-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The odour perception of perfumes is claimed to be associated with gender. Although a gender-sensitive research approach is desirable when the gender variable is in focus, a deeper analysis of this association is uncommon. In this study, 18 participants (aged 20–30 years) gender categorized 12 perfumes. A gender-sensitive approach was applied to the analysis of the gender associations when sniffing perfumes, in order to examine how the participants' gender categorizations correspond to the commercial classifications of the 12 perfumes. The results demonstrate that the participants' gender associations of the perfumes constitute a scale reflecting the perfumes' odour qualities, where only the perfumes perceived as extremely feminine or masculine were categorized in the same way as the commercial classifications. It is therefore argued that the gender dichotomy of femininity and masculinity does not correspond to the perceived gender associations of perfumes in the present study.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Ethnology, History of Religions and Gender Studies, Center for Gender Studies.
    Broad Anthology on Situated Health Studies: Kvinnor, kropp och hälsa [Women, Body, and Health], Elina Oinas & Jutta Ahlbeck-Rehn (Eds)2009In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 139-143Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Book review on a broad anthology on situated health studies

  • 13.
    Rosenberg, Tiina
    Lunds universitet.
    Sublime Politics2011In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 210-212Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Recesnion av Kristina Fjelkestams bok Det sublimas politik: Emancipatorisk estetik i 1800-talets konstnärsromaner, Stockholm: Makadam förlag, 2010

  • 14.
    Tjeder, David
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of History.
    What the gendering of men has engendered: [Recension av] Bo Nilsson. Maskulinitet: Representation, ideologi och retorik (Masculinity, Ideology and Rhetorics). 168 (Umeå : Boréa, 1999).[Recension av] Jens Ljunggren. Kroppens bildning: Linggymnastikens manlighetsprojekt 1790– 1914. (The Fostering of the Human Body). (Stockholm/Stehag: Symposon, 1999).2000In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 168-172Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Tornhill, Sofie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Pursuing Feminist Radicality2011In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 205-209Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Åse, Cecilia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Monarchical Manoeuvres: Gender, Nation and the Boundary Problem in Post-War Swedish Constitutional Development2013In: NORA: Nordic Journal of Feminist and Gender Research, ISSN 0803-8740, E-ISSN 1502-394X, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 172-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish monarchy is often regarded as a purely symbolic institution. Since the constitutional reforms of the mid-1970s, the head of state has lacked formal political power, and rules of succession have been gender-neutral since 1980. This article examines how the monarchy is constitutionally negotiated and the consequences this has for representations of nation and gender. I argue that the constitutional underpinnings of the Swedish monarchy naturalize the idea of a national community. This analysis elucidates the specific dynamics by which political discourse, such as constitutional texts, successfully establishes a supposedly apolitical domain. I also demonstrate the consequences, in terms of norms and ideals regarding gender, sexuality, and family life, of the present constitutional design. The analysis is based on official political documents and debates from the post-war period. Following a section on the evolution of the current regulations surrounding the monarchy, the paper analyses political discourse on the form of government in light of the boundary problem, namely, on what basis can a legitimate people (demos) be affirmed? I demonstrate that the monarchy gives Swedish democracy a national foundation; a legitimate demos is established through the idea of a pre-political national community, personified by the royal family and codified in the hereditary order of succession. In relation to nation and gender, the monarchy connects Swedish nationalism to representations of “blood” and genetic descent. One important conclusion is that the way the Swedish monarchy is constitutionally upheld works against attempts to challenge politically and discuss Swedish nationalism and its relationship to conservative gender norms. Another conclusion is that the monarchy's hereditary principle runs the risk of obstructing free and unfettered discussion of constitutional issues.

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