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  • 1.
    Darhour, Hanane
    et al.
    Ibn Zohr University, Ouarzazate, Morocco.
    Dahlerup, Drude
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sustainable representation of women through gender quotas: A decade's experience in Morocco2013In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 41, no pt2: SI, p. 132-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article surveys the adoption and implementation of gender quota provisions in the three Moroccan parliamentary elections, 2002, 2007 and 2011, following the first adoption of gender quotas. Despite being effective in bringing a substantial number of women into the parliament, the question should be asked, can gender quotas, once introduced, lead to more sustainable political representation for women? By introducing the concept of sustainable representation, defined as a durable, substantial political representation of women, this article points to the importance of studying how gender quotas may or may not alter some of the barriers, which prevents women’s equal participation and representation. This study of the nomination and election of women through three subsequent elections in Morocco since the adoption of gender quotas, traces the evolution of the reserved seat system from a controversial and fragile system set by a ‘honorary agreement’ to an expanded and finally legalized system. The analysis suggests that the political uprising in the neighboring countries during 2010-11 created a political transitional atmosphere for the reform of the Moroccan constitution, and provided an opportunity for institutionalizing the principle of gender equality in the 2011 constitution. In exploring the link between  the reserved seat system and having women elected in the general district seats in Moroccan elections, the article scrutinizes the widespread supposition in the quota literature that quotas in the form of reserved seats tend to block the nomination of women to constituency seats, thus constituting a kind of glass ceiling.

  • 2. Gil Araujo, Sandra
    et al.
    Gonzalez-Fernandez, Tania
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Anthropology.
    International migration, public policies and domestic work Latin American migrant women in the Spanish domestic work sector2014In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 46, p. 13-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on the Spanish case, in this article we explore the connection between migration policies, family policies, gender regimes and the insertion of Latin American migrant women into the domestic work sector. Over the first decade of the twenty-first century, Latin America became the main region of origin of migrants who had settled in Spain, being women the first link in these migration chains. The main factors that have affected the configuration of this feminization are linked to migration policies and patterns of migration, the features of the welfare state, the characteristics of the labor market and the way in which gender organizes and stratifies migration and domestic work. The achievement of national middle class women's rights to conciliate their professional and family life through outsourcing domestic work to non-national women also brings with it a deep inequality in terms of citizenship.

  • 3.
    Jansson, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Feeding children and protecting women: The emergence of breastfeeding as an international concern2009In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 240-248Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Mahlck, Paula
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Academic women with migrant background in the global knowledge economy: Bodies, hierarchies and resistance2013In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 36, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Across the globe, academic work is changing in order to meet the demands of the global knowledge economy. This process of change is characterised by the dominant discourses of competition, accountability and excellence, which produce an imaginary of a seemingly disembodied researcher. Departing from a Swedish higher education and research policy landscape, the aim of this article is to explore how, in comparison with their Swedish colleagues, women academics with a migrant background make representations of the good researcher in their work practices. This involves exploring how processes of racialisation - including processes of whiteness are at work when different layers of migration are read through a white Swedish normality. The results indicate that whiteness is an attributed quality and contributes to constructing success, and that racialised researchers stand out as being particularly invisible representations within a Research Excellence framework. In this article I suggest that this visibility/invisibility paradox (Mirza 2009) can be interpreted not only as a reflection of the number of racialised researchers in Swedish higher education, but also as a general discourse of colour-blindness and Swedish white privilege.

  • 5.
    Rojas, Yerko
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Social Research (SOFI).
    Stickley, Andrew
    Informal social capital in childhood and suicide among adolescent and young adult women: A cross-sectional analysis with 30 countries2014In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, no 42, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using data from the Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) Study 2005/2006, and World Health Organization (WHO), this study examined the relationship between girls' informal social capital and female suicide rates in adolescence and young adulthood in 30 European and North American countries. Regression analyses using normal, robust and bias-corrected confidence intervals were used for this purpose. Informal social capital (involvement with friends after school) among 15 year-old girls explained,9% of the total variation in the young female suicide rate. This effect was of approximately the same magnitude as that of the corresponding male suicide rate. Although the findings of this study provide support for the common notion that female suicide can be understood in relation to male suicide, the association we observed between female informal social capital in adolescence and early adult female suicide highlights the need for more female-specific studies on suicide.

  • 6.
    Waltman, Max
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Sweden’s prohibition of purchase of sex: the law's reasons, impact, and potential2011In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 449-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 1999, Sweden passed a law criminalizing the purchase of sex and decriminalizing the prosti­tuted person. The law was part of an omnibus bill against violence against women, recognizing prostitution as related to such violence. This article analyzes the reasons for the Swedish law and documents the law’s impact, concluding that the law has significantly reduced the occur­rence of prostitution in Sweden compared to neighboring countries. In addition, it addresses some important remaining obstacles to the law’s effective implementation and responds to vari­ous common critiques of (and misinformation about) the law and its effects. Finally, this article argues that, in order to realize the law’s full potential to support escape from prostitution, the civil rights of prostituted persons under current law should be strengthened to enable them to claim damages directly from the tricks/johns for the harm to which they have contributed.

  • 7.
    Webster, Natasha Alexandra
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography.
    Haandrikman, Karen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Human Geography. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Thai women entrepreneurs in Sweden: Critical perspectives on migrant small businesses2017In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 60, p. 17-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thai migrant women are an important and visible part of the small business community in Sweden, most notably through restaurants, massage spas and small shops. In this paper we explore the overlap between migration and entrepreneurship and position ourselves within the feminist entrepreneurial framework. We ask: which Thai women become entrepreneurs? How does being migrant women shape their entrepreneurial activities and practices? Our paper employs a mixed-method design to explore Thai migrant businesses, giving a detailed overview of which women become entrepreneurs based on register data, and providing space for the narratives of women. We find a gendered approach to understanding the business activities of Thai women business practitioners does challenge normative perspectives on entrepreneurship. We show that family structure, migration length, education and partner's labor market status all play important roles. Furthermore, we find that small businesses are sites of negotiation and contestation.

  • 8.
    Winter, Katarina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    Bogren, Alexandra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD).
    The realization of sexed bodies: stable and fragile gender dichotomies in Swedish media representations of biomedical alcohol research2013In: Women's Studies: International Forum, ISSN 0277-5395, E-ISSN 1879-243X, Vol. 37, p. 53-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During recent decades, biomedical research has increasingly entered the press scene, particularly in media stories of healthy bodies and lifestyles. One of the fields where this is visible is in the discussion of alcohol consumption and problems, a field where references to biological sex differences are common. This paper analyzes how facts about sexed bodily difference are made real in Swedish newspaper stories of biomedical alcohol research. Our findings indicate that newspapers represent the body at different levels of abstraction; from detailed descriptions at the molecular level (hormones and genes), through discussion at the molar level (body parts, organs and disease), to more general discussion at the social level (inner nature, sensitivity, and responsibility). We also find a double metaphorical meaning of the word alcohol: alcohol is a solution (a soluble liquid) that also dissolves the dimorphism of bodily sex difference.

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