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  • 1.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Review of David Birdsong (ed.): Second Language Acquisition and the Critical Period Hypothesis. Lawrence Erlbaum, 1999.1999In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 571-575Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Abrahamsson, Niclas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hyltenstam, Kenneth
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The role of language aptitude in first language attrition: The case of prepubescent attriters2010In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 443-464Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While language aptitude has been investigated actively within second language research, there is a current dearth of research on the effects of aptitude in cases of attrition. The aim of the present investigation was to explore the role of language aptitude for L1 proficiency in speakers who experienced a break with their L1 setting prior to puberty. Twenty-five L1 SpanishL2 Swedish bilinguals residing in Sweden participated in the study, and 15 native speakers of Spanish living in Chile were recruited as controls. The L1 proficiency was measured by means of a grammaticality judgement test (GJT) and language aptitude data were obtained through the Swansea Language Aptitude Test (Meara et al. <xref ref-type="bibr" rid="B36">2003</xref>). Results showed a positive correlation between GJT performance and language aptitude. More specifically, the bilinguals with above-average aptitude were more likely to score within the native range on the GJT than those with below-average aptitude. It was also seen that among the participants with below-average aptitude, GJT scores were related to daily L1 use. In view of these findings, we suggest that language aptitude has a compensatory function in language attrition, helping the attriter to retain a high level of L1 proficiency despite reduced L1 contact.

  • 3.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Ramirez-Galan, Pedro
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Language Aptitude in First Language Attrition: A Study on Late Spanish-Swedish Bilinguals2016In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 621-638Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Language aptitude remains one of the most understudied predictor variables in L1 attrition research. The current study seeks to address this gap by investigating the effects of language aptitude on L1 retention in late attriters. Forty L1 Spanish - L2 Swedish bilinguals living in Sweden participated in the study, along with 20 functionally monolingual L1 speakers of Spanish. L1 proficiency was measured by means of a grammaticality judgement test (GJT) and language aptitude data were obtained through the LLAMA Language Aptitude Test (Meara 2005). Additional data on the participants' linguistic background were also collected. Results revealed a robust difference in GJT scores between the bilinguals and the control group. However, degree of language aptitude was not found to exert a significant influence on the bilinguals' GJT performance. Instead, the only significant predictor for GJT performance was linguistic identification, showing that those participants with strong L1 identification were more accurate in judging L1 grammaticality. The lack of aptitude effects on L1 attrition is discussed against the background of age-related attrition susceptibility.

  • 4. Cekaite, Asta
    et al.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Language play, a collaborative resource in children's L2 learning2005In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 169-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Within communicative language teaching, ‘natural’ language has had a privileged position, and a focus on form has been seen as something inauthentic or as something that is inconsequential for learning (for a critique, see Kramsch and Sullivan 1996; Cook 1997). Yet in the present study of an immersion classroom, it was found that children with limited L2 proficiency recurrently employed form-focused language play in spontaneous peer conversations. Our work involves a distinct focus on multiparty talk, and it is shown how language play is, in many ways, a collaborative affair, initiated by the children themselves. Playful mislabelings and puns often generated extended repair sequences that could be seen as informal ‘language lessons’ focused on formal aspects of language. Simultaneously, shared laughter and shifting alignments between peers were central aspects of the local politics of classroom life. The joking was quite rudimentary. Yet it included artful performance and collaborative aestheticism, involving alliteration and other forms of parallelisms, as well as code switching, laughing, and artful variations in pitch, volume and voice quality. The paper illustrates the need to integrate language play in models of L2 learning.

  • 5.
    Ganuza, Natalia
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hedman, Christina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    The Impact of Mother Tongue Instruction on the Development of Biliteracy: Evidence from Somali-Swedish Bilinguals2019In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 108-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates if participation in mother tongue instruction (henceforth MTI) impacts the biliteracy proficiency of young bilinguals, drawing on examples from Somali–Swedish bilinguals and Somali MTI in a Swedish school context. In the study, biliteracy was operationalized as reading proficiency and vocabulary knowledge in two languages, which was tested with measures of word decoding, reading comprehension, and vocabulary breadth and depth. The study was designed to allow for cross-sectional, longitudinal, and cross-linguistic analyses of data. Overall, the results showed that participation in MTI contributed positively to participants’ results on Somali reading comprehension, beyond the influence of chronological age, age of arrival, and reported home language and literacy use. Furthermore, higher results in Somali were associated with higher results on the same measures in Swedish, in particular for the reading measures. In sum, the results indicate that MTI has an impact on some aspects of literacy proficiency in the mother tongue, despite the restricted time allocated for it (<1 h/week). They also indicate that MTI, albeit indirectly, may benefit the stated proficiencies in the language of schooling.

  • 6.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Review of Ryuko Kubota and Angel M. Y. Lin (eds): Race, Culture, and Identities in Second Language Education: Exploring Critically Engaged Practice.2011In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 244-247Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Bello-Nonjengele, Basirat
    Game changers? Multilingual learners in a Cape Town primary school2016In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 37, no 4, p. 451-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article engages with Bourdieu’s notion of field as a ‘space of play’ to explore what happens to the educational field and the linguistic regimes operating within it in a site in which new discourses and practices of identity, language, ‘race’, and ethnicity become entangled with local economies of meaning. The context is a primary school in a low-income neighbourhood in Cape Town, South Africa. We draw on multilingual classroom and playground data from observations, interviews, and audio-recorded peer interactions among Grade 6 learners to illuminate the strategic mobilization of linguistic repertoires in encounters across difference: as identity-building resources and as means of shaping new interaction orders, restructuring hierarchies of value, subverting indexicalities, and sometimes resignifying racial categories. We further draw attention to a set of circumstances in which local actors have the potential to change, not only the rules of the game, but the game itself.

  • 8.
    Kuteeva, Maria
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    McGrath, Lisa
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The theoretical research article as a reflection of disciplinary practices: The case of pure mathematics2015In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 215-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen an interest in the generic structure of empirical research articles across a variety of disciplines. However, significantly less attention has been given to theoretical articles. This study aims to begin to address this imbalance by presenting the results of an investigation into the organizational and rhetorical structure of theoretical pure mathematics research articles. The data set combines a close analysis of 22 peer-reviewed articles and semi-structured interviews with their authors. While there is considerable variation in terms of the major section headings and content, the results reveal an overall structure that differs from a typical empirical research article. We argue that this alternative structure is produced by the dual argumentation—mathematical and meta-mathematical—which runs throughout the text. Moreover, triangulation with the interview data indicates that the structural patterns of the theoretical pure mathematics research article can be viewed as a reflection of the research practices and epistemology of the discipline.

  • 9.
    Negretti, Raffaella
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. Chalmers Technical University, Sweden.
    Calibrating Genre: Metacognitive Judgments and Rhetorical Effectiveness in Academic Writing by L2 Graduate Students2017In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 38, no 4, p. 512-539Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several strands of applied linguistic research have emphasized the importance of genre awareness for academic writing students. Although metacognitive behaviors have been linked to L2 writing proficiency and performance, there is still the need for an account of how and why different metacognitive behaviors can help L2 academic writers to apply genre knowledge in authentic situations. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, this study borrows the framework of calibration from educational psychology to highlight the relationship between the accuracy of graduate students’ metacognitive judgments and the quality of their texts. Within an authentic setting, the nature of metacognitive judgments is calibrated against the assessment of rhetorical effectiveness by teacher raters using genre analysis criteria. Findings show that individual differences in rhetorical effectiveness can be better understood when accuracy of metacognitive judgments is considered along two qualitative dimensions: depth and alignment. Differential achievement relates to the ability to apply genre knowledge to the text, and misalignments in task perceptions and criteria. Implications for genre pedagogy and further research are discussed.

  • 10.
    Williams, Sarah
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Hammarberg, Björn
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Language switches in L3 production: Implications for a polyglot speaking model1998In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 295-333Article in journal (Refereed)
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