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  • 1. Andersson, Marta
    ‘I know that women don’t like me!’.: Presuppositions in therapeutic discourse.2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 721-737Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköpings universitet.
    Review of Family dinner talk by Shoshana Blum-Kulka1999In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 287-292Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aarsand, Pål
    Response cries and other gaming moves: Toward an intersubjectivity of gaming2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, p. 1557-1575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the ways in which response cries (Goffman, 1981) are deployed as interactional resources in computer gaming in everyday life. It draws on a large-scale data set of video recordings of the everyday lives of middleclass families. The recordings of gaming between children and between children and parents show that response cries were not arbitrarily located within different phases of gaming (planning, gaming or commenting on gaming). Response cries were primarily used as interactional resources for securing and sustaining joint attention (cf. Goodwin, 1996) during the gaming as such, that is, during periods when the gaming activity was characterized by a relatively high tempo. In gaming between children, response cries co- occurred with their animations of game characters and with sound making, singing along, and code switching in ways that formed something of an action aesthetic, a type of aesthetic that was most clearly seen in gaming between game equals (here: between children). In contrast, response cries were rare during the planning phases and during phases in which the participants primarily engaged in setting up or adjusting the game.

  • 4. Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Thorell, Mia
    Family politics in children's play directives1999In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 25-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on children's role play directives as displays of gender stereotypes and power hierarchies in family life. Studies on politeness have primarily focused on directives at the mitigation end of a politeness continuum. The present study has particularly addressed the aggravation end of the continuum and, as predicted, family role play was rich in aggravations. A specific type of escalation, called threat-tell sequences, showed how the children successively moved from a metapragmatic level to a pragmatic level, and at times ultimately to a level of embodied action. Focusing in depth on children's embodied role play directives in face-to-face interaction, this study shows how politeness models need to be expanded in order to account for aggravated moves and paradoxical communication.

  • 5.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.
    An analysis of polyadic lingua franca speech: A communicative strategies framework2014In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 66, p. 122-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports on an analysis of the communicative strategies (CSs) used by speakers in spoken lingua franca English (ELF) in an academic setting. The purpose of the work has primarily been to outline the CSs used in polyadic ELF speech which are used to ensure communication effectiveness in consequential situations and to present a framework that shows the different communicative functions of a number of CSs. The data comprise fifteen group sessions of naturally occurring student group-work talk in content courses at a technical university. Detailed qualitative analyses have been carried out, resulting in a framework of the communication strategies used by the speakers. The methodology here provides us with a taxonomy of CSs in natural ELF interactions. The results show that other than explicitness strategies, comprehension checks, confirmation checks and clarification requests were frequently employed CSs in the data. There were very few instances of self and other-initiated word replacement, most likely owing to the nature of the high-stakes interactions where the focus is on the task and not the language. The results overall also show that the speakers in these ELF interactions employed other-initiated strategies as frequently as self-initiated communicative strategies.

  • 6.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Pragmatic strategies in English as an academic lingua franca:  Ways of achieving communicative effectiveness2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 950-964Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will report the findings of a study that has investigated spoken English as a lingua franca (ELF) usage in Swedish higher education. The material comprises digital recordings of lectures and student group-work sessions, all being naturally occurring, authentic high-stakes spoken exchange, i.e. from non-language-teaching contexts. The aim of the present paper, which constitutes a part of a larger study, has been to investigate the role pragmatic strategies play in the communicative effectiveness of English as a lingua franca. The paper will document types of pragmatic strategies as well as point to important differences between the two speech event types and the implications of these differences for English-medium education. The findings show that lecturers in ELF settings make less frequent use of pragmatic strategies than students who deploy these strategies frequently in group-work sessions. Earlier stages of the present study (Björkman, 2008a, Björkman, 2008b and Björkman, 2009) showed that despite frequent non-standardness in the morphosyntax level, there is little overt disturbance in student group-work, and it is highly likely that a variety of pragmatic strategies that students deploy prevents some disturbance. It is reasonable to assume that, in the absence of appropriate pragmatic strategies used often in lectures, there is an increased risk for covert disturbance

  • 7.
    Björkman, Beyza
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The pragmatics of English as a lingua franca in the international university: Introduction2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 4, p. 923-925Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Forsberg, Fanny Lundell
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of French, Italian and Classical Languages.
    Erman, Britt
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    High level requests: a study of long residency l2 users of English and French and native speakers2012In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 44, no 6-7, p. 756-775Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With few exceptions the field of L2 pragmatics has focussed on intermediate and advanced learners and there is little knowledge to date regarding highly proficient, immersed L2 speakers' pragmatic performance. This study concerns L2 speakers having been immersed culturally and professionally for a considerable length of time. Our focus is on-line production of the request sequence by Swedish speakers of L2 English and L2 French having lived and worked approximately 10 years in the L2 country against matched native controls. The task is a role play between an employee and her/his boss implying high demands on the pragmatic knowledge of the participants. Our main results indicate that both groups of L2 users significantly underuse lexical and syntactic downgraders. It is argued in this paper that this underuse is not due to a lack of pragmalinguistic resources, i.e., they use the same types as the native speakers, but is of a socio-pragmatic nature, i.e., they do not downgrade to the same extent. Furthermore, L2 users significantly underuse 'situation-bound' routinized formulaic sequences for expressing the Head act. This result, in contrast, points to a lack of pragmalinguistic resources.

  • 9.
    Gerholm, Tove
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Children's development of facework practices - An emotional endeavor2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 13, p. 3099-3110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses the origin and development of facework practices in young children by focusing on two kinds of practices in child–parent interaction: (1) situations in which a child’s verbal and nonverbal emotive expressions indicate a need to save face; and (2) situations in which a child uses various strategies in order to save face. Through illustrations from a longitudinal material of child–adult interaction it is argued that emotive reactions constitute the base for face awareness in children. This awareness in time turns to child facework practices, a process aided and shaped by the interactional routines with parents. The central aim of the article is to highlight these two aspects of facework, one internal, emotional and related to face; the other external and interactional. As a second aim the article will enforce that the way we analyze interaction must be transparent in that it can be understood, reviewed and contested by others.

  • 10. Henricson, Sofie
    et al.
    Nelson, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism.
    Giving and receiving advice in higher education. Comparing Sweden-Swedish and Finland-Swedish supervision meetings2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 109, p. 105-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article we compare advice-giving in academic supervision meetings at Swedish-speaking university departments in Sweden and Finland. Working within the field of variational pragmatics and analyzing interaction in detail we show how Sweden-Swedish and Finland-Swedish supervisors and students, as experts and non-experts in an institutional setting, initiate and respond to advice. The data consist of video and/or audio recordings of eight naturally occurring supervision meetings. All meetings show a similar pattern regarding the frequency and sequential structure of advice initiation and reception. The main differences between the two data sets occur in how advice is formulated and acknowledged. In the Sweden-Swedish data, advice is often given with strong mitigation and responded to by upgraded acknowledgements. In the Finland-Swedish data, advice delivery is more succinct and acknowledgements are often neutral.

  • 11.
    Jonsson, Carla
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Functions of code-switching in bilingual theater: An analysis of three Chicano plays2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 1296-1310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study examines functions of code-switching in Chicano theater, i.e. in writing intended for performance. The investigation focuses on local functions of code-switching. These are functions that can be seen in the text and, as a consequence, can be regarded as meaningful for the audience of the plays. In the study these functions are examined, focusing on five loci in which code-switching is frequent, namely quotations, interjections, reiterations, 'gaps' and word/language play. The data of the study consists of three published plays by a Chicana playwright. The study concludes that code-switching fills creative, artistic and stylistic functions in the plays and that it can be used to add emphasis to a certain word or passage, to add another level of meaning, to deepen/intensify a meaning, to clarify, to evoke richer images and to instruct the audience about a particular concept. Code-switching is also used to mark closeness, familiarity, to emphasize bonds, and to include or, on the contrary, to mark distance, break bonds and exclude. Complex identities of the characters as well as the plots of the plays are constructed and developed by means of language. Code-switching is thus used to enhance and support the representation of the characters.

  • 12.
    Kunitz, Silvia
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Scriptlines as emergent artifacts in collaborative group planning2015In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 76, p. 135-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By adopting a process-oriented, praxeological approach to planning research, this study illustrates how group planning is collaboratively achieved as a situated activity during interactions-for-classroom-tasks. Such approach, based on the theoretical tenets of Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis, gives an emic (i.e., participant-relevant), non-mentalist account of planning as a nexus of situated discursive and embodied practices. The analysis focuses on a planning session during which three adult learners of Italian as a foreign language prepare for a classroom presentation in their L2; the final planning product is a written script for the presentation. Specifically, the participants' plan for their classroom presentation emerges as orally formulated scriptlines, which are collaboratively shaped until they come to constitute a written script for the presentation. Overall, this process-oriented study provides a moment-by-moment documentation of the participants' planning practices, such as inscribing, writing aloud, translating into their L2, and retranslating into their L1. The findings suggest that teachers should give students planning time in the classroom, in order to observe the students' practices and make sure that their respective interpretations of the final task follow the same agenda. Moreover, the direct observation of the planning process could provide an opportunity for assessment for learning.

  • 13. Lindström, Jan K.
    et al.
    Norrby, Catrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wide, Camilla
    Nilsson, Jenny
    Intersubjectivity at the counter: Artefacts and multimodal interaction in theatre box office encounters2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 108, p. 81-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigates the interplay between language, material and embodied resources in one specific type of service encounters: interactions at theatre box offices. The data consist of video recorded interactions in Swedish at three box offices, two in Sweden and one in Finland. Cases representative of the interactions are selected for a multimodal micro-analysis of the customer--seller interactions involving artefacts from the institutional and personal domain. The study specifically aims at advancing our understanding of the role of artefacts for structuring and facilitating communicative events in (institutional) interaction. In this way, it contributes to the growing research interest in the interactional importance of the material world. Our results show that mutual interactional focus is reached through mutual gaze in strategic moments, such as formulation of the reason for the visit. Artefacts are central in enhancing intersubjectivity and mutual focus in that they effectively invite the participants for negotiation, for example, about a seating plan which can be made visually accessible in different ways. Verbal language can be sparse and deictic in these moments while gaze and pointing to an artefact does more specific referential work. Artefacts are also a resource for signalling interactional inaccessibility, the seller orienting to the computer in order to progress a request and the customer orienting to a personal belonging (like a bag) to mirror and accept such a temporary non-accessibility. We also observe that speech can be paced to match the deployment of an artefact so that a focal verbal item is produced without competing, simultaneous physical activity.

  • 14.
    Norrby, Catrin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Wide, Camilla
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Lindström, Jan
    Helsinki University, Finland.
    Nilsson, Jenny
    Institute for Language and Folklore, Sweden.
    Interpersonal relationships in medical consultations: Comparing Sweden Swedish and Finland Swedish address practices2015In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 84, p. 121-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates how interpersonal relationships are expressed in medical consultations. In particular, we focus on how modes of address are used in the two national varieties of Swedish: Sweden Swedish and Finland Swedish, with the aim to compare the pragmatic routines in the two varieties. Thus the study contributes to the field of variational pragmatics, where national varieties of pluricentric languages are recognised as important research objects.  Address practices are analysed in two comparable corpora of video recordings from Sweden and Finland using both a quantitative and a qualitative CA-inspired method. There are several differences between the data sets: the Sweden Swedish data are characterised by exclusive use of the informal T pronoun (du ‘you’) and an overall higher frequency of direct address compared to the Finland Swedish data. In some medical consultations in the latter Swedish data the formal V pronoun (ni) is used. The qualitative analysis confirms these differences and the tendency is that the Sweden-Swedish medical consultations are more informal than the Finland-Swedish ones, which are characterised by more formality and maintenance of social distance between the interlocutors. The different pragmatic orientations at the micro level of communication can also be related to socio-cultural preferences at the macro level in society – the development towards greater informality and intimate language is more pronounced in Sweden than in Finland. 

  • 15.
    Pagin, Peter
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Philosophy.
    Assertion Not Possibly Social2009In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 41, p. 2563-2567Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In his paper ‘Why assertion may yet be social’ (Pegan, this issue), Philip Pegan directs two main criticisms against my earlier paper ‘Is assertion social?’ (Pagin, 2004). I argued that what I called ‘‘social theories’’, are inadequate, and I suggested a method for generating counterexamples to them: types of utterance which are not assertions by intuitive standards, but which are assertion by the standards of those theories. Pegan’s first criticism is that I haven’t given an acceptable characterization of the class of social theories. His second criticism is that I have overlooked some alternatives, and that there are social theories that are not affected by my argument. In Section 1 I discuss the first, and in Section 2 the second.

  • 16.
    Pauletto, Franco
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Galeano, Giorgia
    Endearment and address terms in family life: Children’s and parents’ directives in Italian and Swedish dinnertime interaction2017In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 109, p. 82-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this study is on the use of endearment terms and affective resources (including other address terms, as well as nonverbal calibration) in requests sequences in inter-generational interaction, expanding prior work on requests as social action. This study documents verbal and embodied practices in dinnertime talk (30 hours of video) deployed by both parents and children in order to get things done. The analyses show ways in which endearment terms were recurrently deployed in request sequences, marking both trouble and social intimacy. Moreover, the data show that endearment terms were exclusively deployed by the parents, but not by their children. The adults and children drew on different repertoires of affective resources: the children deployed an array of nonverbal and nonvocal means to display their affective stances. In addition, the parents resorted to endearment terms, nicknames, and diminutives, as lexical devices invoking intimate bonds in a context where social solidarity might be at stake. Finally, while children’s requests target an immediate action concerning food and food-related activities rooted in the here and now of the interaction, parental requests can be often analyzed as redressive actions, prompted by the child’s (troublesome) behavior.

  • 17.
    Pedersen, Jan
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    The different Swedish tack: An ethnopragmatic investigation of Swedish thanking and related concepts2010In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 1258-1265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, people thank each other a lot. The reasons for this are partly linguistic, as the Swedish tack is different from e.g. English thanks. It encompasses both the meaning of 'thanks', and that of 'please'. More interestingly, there are cultural reasons for this. For ethnic Swedes, there are some higher-order cultural scripts, such as equality, self-sufficiency, consensus seeking and conflict avoidance, which make people say tack a lot in order to show that they agree, and in order not to be indebted to other people. For ethnic Swedes, it is culturally important to pay your way, to return favours (tjanster och gentjanster to retain the equilibrium between individuals. If this practise is not observed, the equilibrium is disturbed, and you end up in a debt of gratitude (tacksamhetsskuld), which can be very unpleasant for an ethnic Swede. This means that s/he thinks that s/he loses her independence and the equilibrium between him/her and the other person. This may result in ethnic Swedes seeming inhospitable, as they are reluctant to make other people feel tacksamhetsskuld. This study of the cultural key word tack and its related notions shows that there are peculiarities in the Swedish language that can be accessible to outsiders through the natural semantic metalanguage.

  • 18.
    Posio, Pekka
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    You and we: Impersonal second person singular and other referential devices in Spanish sociolinguistic interviews2016In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 99, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present investigation deals with the variable use of referential devices expressing generic or speaker-oriented reference in a corpus of sociolinguistic interviews where Spanish informants talk about their studies and work experience. The analysis focuses on impersonal second person singulars (2SG-imp), which are compared with the first person singular (1SG) and plural (1PL), uno ‘one’ and reflexive-based impersonal constructions. Quantitative analysis shows that age, gender and familiarity between the speakers are significant factors in accounting for the inter-speaker variation. There is a negative correlation between age and 2SG-imp usage and a positive correlation between age and 1PL usage, and female speakers use both constructions more than men. I discuss the relation of the choice of referring expressions and the expression of intersubjectivity in the interviews. Qualitative analysis of the interview content suggests that there is a connection between the choice of referential devices and generational differences in the choice of individual vs. collective perspective and the inclusion of the addressee.

  • 19.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Rapport building in student group work2011In: Journal of Pragmatics, ISSN 0378-2166, E-ISSN 1879-1387, Vol. 43, no 12, p. 2932-2947Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do students build rapport in online group work, especially if all they have to work with is asynchronous text? Taking this question as a point of departure, this paper presents research into the ‘interactional’ function in group work among university students, specifically investigating rapport-building language use, defined as communicative acts promoting social concord. Rapport building is examined in online student group work, using written material in the form of discussion board messages (from the Mid-Sweden Corpus of Computer-Assisted Language Learning). To help bring out what is characteristic of the online type of discourse, spoken face-to-face material also representing student– student interaction (from the Michigan Corpus of Academic Spoken English) is included. Frequency word lists based on the two sets of material were used in combination with concordancing in order to find which of the most frequent expressions functioned as rapport building, thus combining corpus-based and discourse-analytical methods. A taxonomy of rapport-building discourse functions was developed, containing four major categories: discourse-structuring, intratextual, face-saving and bonding units. Each of these covers specific discourse functions; in the case of bonding units, these are Agreeing; Aligning with in-group; Commiserating; Complimenting; Seeking agreement; Offering encouragement; Thanking; Responding to thanks; and Chatting.

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