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  • 1.
    Brosig, Benjamin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Binnick, Robert. The Past Tenses of the Mongolian Verb: Meaning and Use (Empirical Approaches to Linguistic Theory I). Leiden and Boston: Brill, 20122013In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 235-241Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Khalkha Mongolian has four past tense suffixes, -v, -san, -laa and -jee, and their semantic difference has been the subject of considerable disagreement in the literature. Robert Binnick discussed these suffixes in two earlier papers (1979, 1990). With The past tenses of the Mongolian verb (henceforth PTMV) he has now dedicated a full monograph to solving this problem.

  • 2.
    Bylund, Emanuel
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Athanasopoulos, Panos
    Oostendorp, Marcelyn
    Motion event cognition and grammatical aspect: Evidence from Afrikaans2013In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 51, no 5, p. 929-955Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on the relationship between grammatical aspect and motion event construal has posited that speakers of non-aspect languages are more prone to encoding event endpoints than are speakers of aspect languages (e. g., von Stutterheim and Carroll 2011). In the present study, we test this hypothesis by extending this line of inquiry to Afrikaans, a non-aspect language which is previously unexplored in this regard. Motion endpoint behavior among Afrikaans speakers was measured by means of a linguistic retelling task and a non-linguistic similarity judgment task, and then compared with the behavior of speakers of a non-aspect language (Swedish) and speakers of an aspect language (English). Results showed the Afrikaans speakers' endpoint patterns aligned with Swedish patterns, but were significantly different from English patterns. It was also found that the variation among the Afrikaans speakers could be partially explained by taking into account their frequency of use of English, such that those who used English more frequently exhibited an endpoint behavior that was more similar to English speakers. The current study thus lends further support to the hypothesis that speakers of different languages attend differently to event endpoints as a function of the grammatical category of aspect.

  • 3.
    Koptjevskaja-Tamm, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    New directions in lexical typology2012In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 373-394Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Linell, Per
    et al.
    Universitetet i Linköping.
    Gustavsson, Lennart
    Universitetet i Linköping.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University.
    Interactional dominance in dyadic communication: a  presentation of initiative-response analysis.1988In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, no 26, p. 415-442Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Miestamo, Matti
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Maj-Britt Mosegaard Hansen and Jacqueline Visconti (eds.): The Diachrony of Negation. Studies in Language Companion Series 160. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 20142016In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 871-875Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    The morphologization of negation constructions in Nalca (Mek, Tanah Papua), or, how nothing easily moves to the middle of a word2018In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 1413-1461Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Mek language Nalca has undergone a rapid synthetization of verbal negation by way of two successive stages of asymmetric negation, the first one involving referential zeroing with a verbal noun, the second one reintroducing person marking with an auxiliary in analogy to non-verbal predicates. This development can be traced in texts in the more conservative closely related Mek language Eipo. Referential zeroing originally had the connotation of absolute negation (more than the denial of one specific event). As Nalca negation was integrated into inflectional morphology, it developed some of the hallmarks of autonomous morphology - morphomes and empty morphs. Nalca negation illustrates how grammaticalization and analogy can go hand-in-hand. The fusion of verbal negation is a case of the morphologization of a construction which does not occur in isolation but in concert with other similar processes, together entailing a fragmentation of negation marking. Finally, the Nalca development shows that cases of fusion of verbal negation must be taken into account when dealing with the interplay of existential negation and verbal negation in terms of cyclic processes.

  • 7.
    Wälchli, Bernhard
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Cysouw, Michael
    Lexical typology through similarity semantics: Toward a semantic map of motion verbs2012In: Linguistics, ISSN 0024-3949, E-ISSN 1613-396X, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 671-710Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses a multidimensional probabilistic semantic map of lexical motion verb stems based on data collected from parallel texts (viz. translations of the Gospel according to Mark) for 100 languages from all continents. The crosslinguistic diversity of lexical semantics in motion verbs is illustrated in detail for the domain of 'go', 'come', and 'arrive' type contexts. It is argued that the theoretical bases underlying probabilistic semantic maps from exemplar data are the isomorphism hypothesis (given any two meanings and their corresponding forms in any particular language, more similar meanings are more likely to be expressed by the same form in any language), similarity semantics (similarity is more basic than identity), and exemplar semantics (exemplar meaning is more fundamental than abstract concepts).

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