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  • 1.
    Blåsjö, Mona
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Christensson, Johan
    University of Gävle, Sweden.
    Questions as literacy practice and boundary object in a teacher education setting2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 48, p. 85-95Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Danielsson, Kristina
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Modes and meaning in the classroom – The role of different semiotic resources to convey meaning in science classrooms2016In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 35, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study is framed within social semiotic perspectives on multimodality, and it has a twofold aim. The primary aim is to analyze the ways in which teachers draw on different semiotic resources when introducing a new scientific concept in secondary school science classrooms, and to link the results to modal affordance. A secondary aim is to try out parallel analyses of different modes in multimodal meaning making using the ideational meta-function of the SFL framework. Analyses are based on instructional episodes when chemistry teachers introduced the atom as a scientific phenomenon. The main focus of the analyses is on processes used in different modes and how these depict the atom as either static or dynamic. The framework proved fruitful, and analyses revealed important patterns as to what aspects of the atom were given through what mode(s), something which could partly be linked to modal affordance. The results are discussed in relation to its implications for research and education.

  • 3.
    Hedman, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Magnusson, Ulrika
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Language Education.
    Student ambivalence toward second language education in three Swedish upper secondary schools2020In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 55, article id 100767Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper explores the relatively unique educational design of the school subject Swedish as a second language (SSL) through ethnographic fieldwork in three linguistically diverse schools in Sweden. A main point is the importance of carefully considering the local educational context in relation to its organizational design and embeddedness in language ideologies and linguistic hierarchies when researching and discussing educational practices designed for linguistically and culturally diverse students. Since L2 education2 may become part of a negative social categorization of students (e.g. Talmy, 2011), we focus on student perspectives, i.e. 15 students’ narrated experiences of SSL in upper secondary schools where SSL is a voluntary subject3 and the teachers are highly qualified. On the basis of stance analysis (Du Bois, 2007, Jaffe, 2009), we discuss both the students’ motives for choosing SSL and their reasons for continuing to study SSL. Findings show an ambivalence toward the subject, which is related to conflicting discourses surrounding it (Hedman & Magnusson, 2018). On the one hand, the narratives reflect that SSL may be associated with negative societal discourses on immigration and L2 use; on the other, they provide examples of affordances of SSL, i.e. counter images to these discourses (cf. contrastive insights, Hymes, 1996). Not least, pedagogical scaffolding of advanced content was analyzed as a main reward. The fact that attending SSL in these schools was not an exception, separating a few from the majority, also allows for a problematization of “mainstream”.

  • 4.
    Kaufhold, Kathrin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English.
    Creating translanguaging spaces in students’ academic writing practices2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 45, p. 1-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Postgraduates increasingly write in multilingual contexts. Studies have focused on developing bilingual expertise or harnessing expressions of writer identity. Yet, the role of students’ linguistic ideologies and their writing experiences has so far not been problematised. Based on Busch’s sociolinguistic model oflinguistic repertoire (2012), this paper investigates how students develop their academic writing across language codes and registers in the multilingual contexts of a Swedish university. The qualitative, longi-tudinal study presents data from two students including interviews based on the students’ written text relating to their master’s thesis. Findings show that students’ linguistic ideologies and their experiences can enable or restrict their capacity to draw on their varied repertoires. When enabled, students create translanguaging spaces for meaning making in collaboration with peers and institutional actors. I argue that the metaphor of translanguaging space can be fruitfully applied as a pedagogic tool.

  • 5.
    Milani, Tommaso M.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    Voices of authority in conflict: The making of the expert in a Swedish language debate2007In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 99-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper aims to investigate an aspect of a recent public debate about bilingual education in Sweden. Focusing on the textual exchanges between some of the academics who intervened in the debate in the columns of one of the leading Swedish dailies, Dagens Nyheter, the paper will draw upon performativity theory to argue that expertise in language debates is a complex phenomenon which is constantly enacted and contested through discourse. Rather than pre-positing who is the expert and therefore speaks with authority in a given matter, the paper will try to tease out some of the strategies that social actors, under certain discursive constraints, deploy to construct their competence in a specific issue, thus investing their statements with authority.

  • 6.
    Rydell, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Being ‘a competent language user’ in a world of Others – Adult migrants’ perceptions and constructions of communicative competence2018In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 45, p. 101-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates the lived experience of language (Busch, 2017) in relation to perceptions of what it means to be ‘a competent language user’. How to define language competence is an ongoing discussion in applied linguistics. However, relatively little attention has been given to the lived experiences of adult migrants with respect to their perceptions of competence. Drawing on an analysis of focus group discussions with adult migrants enrolled in a language program in basic Swedish, this article builds on understandings of communicative competence as a relational construct shaped by intersubjective processes. Corroborating the relational view of competence is the importance given to emotional perspectives on competence and the role played by assessments, both those made by others and internalized self-assessments. Meanwhile, discourses on the language competence of adult migrants often frame successful language learning as an individual responsibility and achievement, obscuring the relational process underlying the perceptions and constructions of communicative competence.

  • 7.
    Stroud, Christopher
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Kerfoot, Caroline
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. University of the Western Cape, South Africa.
    Towards rethinking multilingualism and language policy for academic literacies2013In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 396-405Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The language policy of the University of the Western Cape (2003) reflects the temperedtraces of historically and politically charged negotiations. We argue that a reinterpreta-tion of ‘policy failure’ as responsive engagement with complex new forms of linguisticand social diversity can lead to a critical rethinking of the nature of multilingualism andlanguage policy in a South African tertiary education sector in transformation. We submitthat university language policies need to consider (a) how the complex linguistic and non-linguistic repertoires of students can be mobilised for transformative discipline-specificcurricula and pedagogies, and (b) the concept of multilingualism both as a resource anda transformative epistemology and methodology of diversity. We suggest a policy devel-opment process that moves from micro-interaction to macro-structure, tracing processesof resemiotisation, interrogating legitimised representational conventions, and reshapinginstitutional practices and perceptions. We discuss the implications for register formationand for broader epistemological access and ownership.

  • 8.
    Åhlund, Anna
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Corrections as multiparty accomplishments in L2 classroom conversations2015In: Linguistics and Education, ISSN 0898-5898, E-ISSN 1873-1864, Vol. 30, p. 66-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Much research on classroom talk has had a dyadic teacher-student bias. This study documents multiparty aspects of repair work through analyses of talk in a classroom community. Drawing on 40h of video-recordings from Swedish L2 lessons in a language immersion classroom, participant contributions were analyzed as those of a party (Schegloff, 1995), rather than merely as individual contributions. The detailed analyses of correction trajectories reveal that both the teacher and the students produced exposed corrections (Jefferson, 1987) as well as embedded corrections (corrective recasts). The analyses illuminate the teacher's sustained efforts in tailoring classroom talk to the classroom community's displayed understanding and varying skills, something that involved a continuous balancing act between form-accuracy and conversational progressivity. Moreover, the analyses document student agency (e.g. vicarious responses, chorus responses and peer corrections). In moving away from a dyadic bias, this study of repair work contributes to situated analyses of classroom corrections.

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