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  • 1.
    Börstell, Carl
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Sign Language.
    Pfau, Roland, Markus Steinbach & Annika Herrmann (eds.), A matter of complexity: Subordination in sign languages2016In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 39, no 3, p. 311-317Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Dahl, Östen
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Gregory Stump & Raphael A. Finkel, Morphological Typology: From Word to Paradigm, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 20132014In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 126-132Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Di Garbo, Francesca
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Matthew Baerman, Dunstan Brown & Greville G. Corbett. Morphological Complexity (Cambridge Studies in Linguistics 153). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 20172019In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 129-134Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Grigonyte, Gintare
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Kvist, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, Computational Linguistics.
    Velupillai, Sumithra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Henriksson, Aron
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Swedification patterns of Latin and Greek affixes in clinical text2016In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 39, no 1, p. 5-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Swedish medical language is rich with Latin and Greek terminology which has undergone a Swedification since the 1980s. However, many original expressions are still used by clinical professionals. The goal of this study is to obtain precise quantitative measures of how the foreign terminology is manifested in Swedish clinical text. To this end, we explore the use of Latin and Greek affixes in Swedish medical texts in three genres: clinical text, scientific medical text and online medical information for laypersons. More specifically, we use frequency lists derived from tokenised Swedish medical corpora in the three domains, and extract word pairs belonging to types that display both the original and Swedified spellings. We describe six distinct patterns explaining the variation in the usage of Latin and Greek affixes in clinical text. The results show that to a large extent affixes in clinical text are Swedified and that prefixes are used more conservatively than suffixes.

  • 5.
    heinat, fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Long object shift and reflexives2010In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 67-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short communication is concerned with long object shift of reflexives in Swedish. Only 3rd person reflexives can shift across their antecedent. For some reason this is possible even if the antecedent is 1st or 2nd person as well, but certain requirements on the antecedent are necessary. This paper shows that neither a purely syntactic nor a purely semantic analysis can account for all the facts. Instead the best analysis seems to be one that makes use of Bonet's (1995) post-syntactic morphological processes: feature delinking, feature erasure and feature insertion.

  • 6.
    heinat, fredrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Michael A. Arbib, How the Brain Got Language: The Mirror System Hypothesis2013In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 89-94Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 7. Henricson, Sofie
    et al.
    Mäntynen, Anne
    Nelson, Marie
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Savijärvi, Marjo
    OKAY as a content word: Regulating language and constructing centres of norms in Finnish, Finland-Swedish, and Sweden-Swedish academic writing consultation meetings2023In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on OKAY as a resource for regulating language and constructingnorm centres in authentic consultation meetings related to academic writing and recordedin Finland and Sweden. It gives an overview of all occurrences of OKAY in theinteractional data in question, revealing that the word occurs frequently in academicwriting consultations in Finnish, Finland Swedish, and Sweden Swedish. There aresimilarities in the frequency of its use and the distribution of occurrences betweencounsellor and student in the Finnish and the Finland-Swedish data, whereas the SwedenSwedish counselling interactions follow a slightly different pattern. Through the lens ofconversation analysis and systemic–functional linguistics, we further demonstrate how thecounsellors and the students use the evaluative content word OKAY as a resource forregulating both academic writing and the counselling interaction, and thereby positionthemselves epistemically and orient towards different centres of norms.

  • 8.
    Janson, Tore
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    Rudolf Botha & Martin Everaert (eds.), The Evolutionary Emergence of Language: Evidence and Inference2014In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 451-457Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Juvonen, Päivi
    Stockholm University.
    Repair in Second-Language Instruction1989In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, ISSN ISSN 0332-5865, Vol. 12, p. 183-204Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Larsson, Ida
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Terje Lohndal (ed.), In Search of Universal Grammar: From Old Norse to Zoque (Linguistik Aktuell/Linguistics Today 121). Amsterdam & Philadelphia, PA: JohnBenjamins, 2013. Pp. 3612013In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 36, no 3, p. 387-392Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Miestamo, Matti
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics, General Linguistics.
    A typological perspective on negation in Finnish dialects2011In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 83-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper looks at negation in Finnish dialects from a typological perspective. The focus is on standard negation, i.e. the negation of declarative verbal main clauses. The dialectal variation that Finnish shows in its negative construction is examined in the light of current typological knowledge of the expression of negation. Developmental trends connected to the micro-typological variation are also discussed, Finnish dialects are compared with related and neighbouring languages, and relevant theoretical and methodological issues relating to the meeting point of typology and dialectology are addressed.

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  • 12.
    Miestamo, Matti
    Allmän språkvetenskap /General linguistics Helsingfors universitet.
    Towards a typology of standard negation2000In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 65-88Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Myrberg, Sara
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    Riad, Tomas
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Scandinavian Languages.
    The prosodic hierarchy of Swedish2015In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 115-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We give an overview of the phonological properties and processes that define the categories of the prosodic hierarchy in Swedish: the PROSODIC WORD (omega), the PROSODIC PHRASE (phi) and the INTONATION PHRASE (iota). The separation of two types of tonal prominence, BIG ACCENTS versus SMALL ACCENTS (previously called FOCAL and WORD ACCENT, e.g. Bruce 1977, 2007), is crucial for our analysis. The omega in Swedish needs to be structured on two levels, which we refer to as the minimal omega and the maximal omega, respectively. The minimal omega contains one stress, whereas the maximal. contains one accent. We argue for a separate category phi that governs the distribution of big accents within clauses. The iota governs the distribution of clause-related edge phenomena like the INITIALITY ACCENT and right-edge boundary tones as well as the distribution of NUCLEAR BIG ACCENTS.

  • 14.
    Palm, Rune
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Scandinavian Languages.
    The Gothic Language: A Symposium2011In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 65-71Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Smith, Kelly
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Megyesi, Beata
    Velupillai, Sumithra
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences.
    Kvist, Maria
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Computer and Systems Sciences. Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Professional language in Swedish clinical text: Linguistic characterization and comparative studies2014In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 297-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates the linguistic characteristics of Swedish clinical text in radiology reports and doctor's daily notes from electronic health records (EHRs) in comparison to general Swedish and biomedical journal text. We quantify linguistic features through a comparative register analysis to determine how the free text of EHRs differ from general and biomedical Swedish text in terms of lexical complexity, word and sentence composition, and common sentence structures. The linguistic features are extracted using state-of-the-art computational tools: a tokenizer, a part-of-speech tagger, and scripts for statistical analysis. Results show that technical terms and abbreviations are more frequent in clinical text, and lexical variance is low. Moreover, clinical text frequently omit subjects, verbs, and function words resulting in shorter sentences. Clinical text not only differs from general Swedish, but also internally, across its sub-domains, e.g. sentences lacking verbs are significantly more frequent in radiology reports. These results provide a foundation for future development of automatic methods for EHR simplification or clarification.

  • 16.
    Stroud, Christopher
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Centre for Research on Bilingualism. Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    The development of metropolitan languages in post-colonial contexts: Language contact and language change and the case of Portuguese in Maputo1996In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 19, p. 183-214Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Wirén, Mats
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Linguistics.
    Roland Schäfer & Felix Bildhauer, Web Corpus Construction (Synthesis Lectureson Human Language Technologies 22)2014In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 457-463Article, book review (Other academic)
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    fulltext
  • 18.
    Young, Nathan J.
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Swedish Language and Multilingualism, Centre for Research on Bilingualism.
    McGarrah, Michael
    Forced alignment for Nordic languages: Rapidly constructing a high-quality prototype2023In: Nordic Journal of Linguistics, ISSN 0332-5865, E-ISSN 1502-4717, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 105-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We propose a rapid adaptation of FAVE-Align to the Nordic languages, and we offer our own adaptation to Swedish as a template. This study is motivated by the fact that researchers of lesser-studied languages often neither have sufficient speech material nor sufficient time to train a forced aligner. Faced with a similar problem, we made a limited number of surface changes to FAVE-Align so that it – along with its original hidden Markov models for English – could be used on Stockholm Swedish. We tested the performance of this prototype on the three main sociolects of Stockholm Swedish and found that read-aloud alignments met all of the minimal benchmarks set by the literature. Spontaneous-speech alignments met three of the four minimal benchmarks. We conclude that an adaptation such as ours would especially suit laboratory experiments in Nordic phonetics that rely on elicited speech.

1 - 18 of 18
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  • nn-NO
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