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  • 1.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Activity contracts and directives in everyday family politics2011In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 137-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In theorizing on family life, children's agency is a feature of a modern type of family, marked by free choice and inter-generational negotiations rather than parental authority. A video ethnography of Swedish everyday family life documents directive sequences and inter-generational negotiations, including what is here called activity contracts: agreements that form a type of inter-generational account work around target activities (e.g. cleaning one's room). Within local family politics, contracts and revised contracts emerge as parts of such account work. The analyses focus on how contracts emerge within successive downgradings and upgradings of parental directives. Activity contracts regulate mutual rights and obligations, invoking family rule statements and local moral order, drawing on an array of verbal and nonverbal resources, ranging from parents' mitigated requests and children's time bargaining to nonverbal escape strategies and gentle shepherding.

  • 2. Eriksson, Katarina
    et al.
    Aronsson, Karin
    'We're really lucky. co-creating 'us' and 'the Other' in school book talk2005In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 719-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article addresses how 'Otherness' is co-construed in booktalk in a Swedish school. The data consist of video-recorded teacher-led booktalk sessions, involving small groups of pupils in grades 4–7. Seven of the eight books discussed were, at least partly, set in settings foreign to the pupils. We found that a basic teacher device for constructing the 'Other', was to implicitly or explicitly compare a group of others with the participant children themselves, 'us Swedish children', accomplishing 'Otherness' by foregrounding dif ferences, setting up a series of implicit or explicit contrasts between 'them' and 'us'. Such contrasts concerned: literacy and language skills (Extracts 1 and 2), ways of 'sticking together' (Extracts 3 and 4), as well as contrasts in terms of the distribution of material educational resources and work demands on children (Extracts 5–8). Moreover, the last extracts also illustrate how pupils co-construct the teachers' implicit or explicit underlying moral agendas.

  • 3.
    Ingrids, Henrik
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Child and Youth Studies.
    Blame-account sequences in child custody disputes2014In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 47-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes how cross-examining attorneys and litigating parents accomplished blame attributions and accounts during courtroom examinations in child custody disputes. It draws on recordings from 42 cases. It is shown how person descriptions were vital parts of sequences of blame ascriptions and subsequent blame accounts, where cross-examining attorneys elicited and then invoked parents’ disparaging person descriptions of their ex-partners. As part of the institutional format of these disputes, parents had to handle an interactional dilemma concerning the reflexive implications of blaming others. While blame-implicative descriptions had been used to allocate blame to the ex-partner, they now backfired in that cross-examining attorneys would deploy the same descriptions as ways of reallocating blame (to the testifying parent). As part of such blame reallocations, cross-examining attorneys upgraded alleged prior blame attributions, thus fueling the dispute and setting up a recursive machinery in the form of a never-ending series of blamings.

  • 4.
    Roitman, Malin
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of Romance Studies and Classics.
    Presidential candidates' ethos of credibility: The case of the presidential pronoun/in the 2012 Hollande-Sarkozy debate2014In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 741-765Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The traditional televised debate remains a decisive event in the French presidential elections. This study aims to examine the ways in which French presidential candidates in 2012 reinforce their credibility, their ethos. More specifically, I will study the use of the pronoun I as used in the debate by the candidates, a text element that refers to a physically present I behind the discourse. This pronoun is essential in the 'self-presentation' being developed by candidates in the debates. So, I try to categorize the different types of 'I' relating to the concepts of, for example, solidarity, commitment, authority, patriotism. Second, I will analyze the relationship between ethos and rhetorical use of the French sentential negation ne. pas, the most significant and frequently used counter-argumentative tool used in electoral debates. My studies have shown that counter-argumentation by negation is a relevant parameter for determining the type of text (polemic) and the genre (political debate). The study therefore aims to highlight the relationship between constructions of credibility as presented through the candidates' use of I, on the one hand, and the refutation of one or the other candidate's arguments, on the other. This study is based on an assumption of the theory of polyphony that the sentence negation stratifies the utterance into two points of view that are hierarchically organized and semantically opposed: one that refutes and the other being refuted. My assumption is that candidates build ethos by developing a counter-image of the other candidate. Using the negation then allows the candidates to refer to a negative image of their protagonists, while at the same time providing a positive image of themselves: 'I would not call my Prime Minister a traitor' (Holland, 2012). Sentence negation also seems to be used to save their own ethos, which is the case when candidate A refutes an argument (from candidate B) which discriminates the positive image of candidate A: 'Of course I do not take all the credit, but I also do not take all the blame Mr Hollande' (Sarkozy, 2012). These types of examples show that the form ‘I’ in relation to the function of negation is relevant to an examination of the ethos rhetoric of the candidates.

  • 5.
    Soler-Carbonell, Josep
    Stockholm University, Faculty of Humanities, Department of English. University of Tartu, Estonia.
    Alexandre Duchêne, Melissa Moyer and Celia Roberts (eds), Language, Migration and Social Inequalities: A Critical Sociolinguistic Perspective on Institutions and Work2015In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 782-784Article, book review (Other academic)
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